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Full text of "Genealogical gleanings in England. [Parts I-xxiii,xxv]"

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GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS 
IN ENGLAND 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS 

IN ENGLAND 



ABSTRACTS OF WILLS RELATING TO EARLY AMERICAN 

FAMILIES, WITH GENEALOGICAL NOTES AND 

PEDIGREES CONSTRUCTED FROM 

THE WILLS AND FROM OTHER RECORDS 



By 
HENRY F. WATERS, A.M. 



With the Addition of 

GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND 

(New Series) A-Anyon 

(1907) 

VOLUME II 



Baltimore 
GENEALOGICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1969 



Originally Published in Serial Form 

New England Historical and Genealogical Register 

July, 1883 — January, 1899 

First Published Complete in Book Form 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society 

Boston, 1901 

Reprinted with Permission 

With the Addition of 

Genealogical Gleanings in England 

(New Series) 

By Henry F. Waters 

Salem, 1907 

And with an Added Sub-Title 

Genealogical Publishing Company 
Baltimore, 1969 



Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 78-88096 

<■ CAj y/ 

Copyright © 1969 

Genealogical Publishing Company 

Baltimore, Maryland 

All rights reserved 



Made in the United States of America 



ILLUSTRATIONS AND PEDIGREES. 



YOL. II. 














Page 


Inscription on Capen Gravestone 1060 


Arms. Burges impaling Pye 










094 


Phippen ....... 










997 


Phippen impaling Pye 












998 


Pynchon ...... 












859 


Autographs. George Fitzpen, a/s Phippen 












907 


Tabular Pedigrees. Browne . 












873 


Gary 












1057 


Cary 












1058 


Can- 












1059 


Cole 












1224 


Fitzpen, als Phippen 












907 


Foote 












1285 


Manning 












1323 


Moulston (Moulson) 












013 


Pynchon 












804 


Rogers .... 












1138 


Stephen . 












801 


Talcot . 












1120 


Wliitfield 












1352 


WhitfieM 












1353 


Whiting . 












1123 



(y) 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



Nichas Ptnchon citizen and " bocher " of London, 15 February 
1528, proved 22 April 1533. I bequeath and recommend my soul unto 
Almighty God my maker and redeemer and to the most glorious Virgin 
his mother, our lady Saint Mary, and to all "tholy and blissid company of 
Saintes in hevin." And my body to be buried in the church of St. Nichas 
Flesh shambles of London before the image of our lady there, where the 
body of my late wife lyeth buried. To the high altar of the foresaid church 
for my tithes and oblations negligently forgotten or withholden, in discharge 
of my soul and conscience, ten shillings. To Edward Pinchon my son, in 
the name of his full portion and part of all my goods &c. to him after the 
use and custom of the City of London belonging, thirty three pounds six 
shillings eight pence, to be delivered to him when it shall fortune him to 
come to his full age of twenty one years. A like bequest to sons William, 
Robert and John Pynchon. And I charge all my said children on my 
blessing that they shall hold themselves contented and pleased with my said 
bequests to them made and that they be loving and kind to my wife their 
mother and be ruled after her, and if they or any of them grudge or hold 
not them contented with my said bequests or will not be ruled after my said 
wife then I will that the portion and part of him or them so not contented 
nor ruled shall be abated and " mynishid " after the discretion of my said 
wife. Provisions as to the decease of any of them. And if it fortune all 
my said " childern " before their said lawful ages to decease then I will 
that " oon hundreth mrc " (marks) of their portions shall be applied towards 
the gilding of the Rood loft of the said " paroche " church of St. Nichas 
and the residue bestowed in deeds of charity for the wealth of my soul. 
" Itfn I will that assone after my disceas as conueniently may be there 
shalbe ordeynid an honest able preest of good conuersacion to sing in the 
foresaid church of Saint Nichas for my soule my late wifes soules our 
fathers and mothers soules and all chren soules by the space of three yeres 
complete. And I bequeth to hym for his salary in that behalf vij u vj s viij d 
by the yere. And I will that another preest shall sing in the churche of 
Writtell in the Couutie of Essex for my soule and for the soules of my 
father and mother and all chf en soules by the space of oon hole yere." To 
Parnell my "suster" forty shillings sterling and my gown next the best, 
and to every of her own children six shillings eight pence. To John Pinchon 
my cousin dwelling in Writtell, in discharge of my soul and conscience, 
twenty shillings. " I bequeth to the place of ffrier mynours in London to 
thentent that they shall say a trigintall of masses and pray for my soule 
xl* st. Itfn I bequeth to eu r y of thorder of ffriers Preachours, Carmelites, 
Augustines and Crossid friers to thentent that they shall doo in eu r y of their 
Couent churches for my soule and all chren soules oon trigintall of masses 
x 8 st. a pece siu xl 8 ." Bequests to the prison houses. To every poor man 

(845) 



846 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

and woman keeping chambers in Penthecost Lane, Hunt's Alley and 
Scaldinghouse Alley in the parish of St. Nichas four pence apiece. Ten 
pounds to be applied in buying of coals in the Winter season, in ten years 
next after rny decease, to be distributed amongst the most needy of the poor 
in St. NichSs. To Geffrey Boyland of Mountnesing my best ring: To 
frier John Burthan towards his exhibition at the University sixty six shil- 
lings. Watkin Bissett my servant. " Itui I will that lxvj 8 viij d shalbe 
distributed in peuy doole among poore people at tyme of my buriall and 
at my monthes minde." To the " warkes " of the church of our Lady of 
Woodford, of Harnesey, of West Tilbury and of East Tilbury. The residue 
to Agnes my wife to her own proper use. I make and ordain the said 
Agnes, John Martyn, butcher, and John Hone, tallow chandler, my ex- 
ecutors, and Sir John Mundye knight, alderman of Loudon, overseer. 

Hogeu, 2. 

[The Pynchon family, though closely connected with London, had long held 
lands in Essex. In A. D. 1277-8, in sixth year of King Edward 1st, Richard 
Pinchon, citizen of London, owning property at Latton, County Essex, be- 
queaths it to his daughter Agnes. In 147*5, and eleventh year of King Edward 
IV., John Pynchon of Writtle, in Essex, purchased land in that village. Henry 
Pynchon is one of the witnesses to the deed. In 1479, in nineteenth year of 
King Edward IV., John Pynchon, father and son, are witnesses to a deed of land, 
situated at Brum field, County Essex. The name also appears in connection 
with lands in the eastern and southeastern parts of the same county. There 
are also traces of the family as living from time to time in the city of London. 
According to Stow*s Chronicles, p. 703, the Clothworkers' Hall in the city 
of London, in which Queen Elizabeth entertained the Dutch Ambassadors in 
1585, was situated in Pynchon Lane in the heart of the city, near Tower street. 
In 157(5 there was a John Pinchin liring in London, an attorney of the common 
law, some time of the Middle Temple, and owning a house at Westminster. 

There are also traces of the family in Northamptonshire. Thomas Chichele of 
Higham-Ferrers, in that county, married Agnes, the daughter of William 
Pynchon, Esq., whose arms are the same as those of the family at Writtle. 
This Agnes Pynchon was the mother of Henry Chichele, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury during the reigns of the Lancastrian Kings, Henry IV., V. and VI., and 
Founder of All Soul's College, Oxford. 

The first appearance of the name in England, however, is found in connection 
with the manor of TattershaH, county Lincoln, which was granted to Eudo 
together with one Pinco, his sworn brother in arms, though otherwise not allied, 
Eudo to hold immediately of the King, Pinco his of St. Cuthbert of Durham. 
The son of Pinco was Hugh, fils Pinconis. Hence the name Pincon — Pinchon. 
From this point the family would seem to have drifted into the adjoining county 
of Northampton and thence to London and Essex. — T. R. Pynchon.] 

Alice Spencer late the daughter of Thomas Spencer, citizen and cloth- 
worker of London, 13 November 1543, proved 22 November 1543. To 
l>e buried in the cloister of All Hallows the more in Thames Street, nigh 
unto my father. My mother in law Agnes Spencer. Refers to the will of 
father Thomas Spencer. Tenement called the Wild Man in All Hallows 
belonging to the Goldsmiths. Three tenements in St. Alban's. Wood 
Street, belonging to the Clothworkers. My cousin John Hyde. My 
cousin Richard Lurabe, brewer. My cousin George Hyde. Agnes Hyde, 
liis daughter. Mv cousin John Pynchon, tailor. All my godchildren 
wheresoever they be found. Francis Pope, merchant tailor of London to 
be executoi . 

Among the witnesses was John Pynchon, marchaunt Taillour. 

Spert, 27. 

WYLLYAM Pynchyn of "Wryttyll" in the Co. of Essex, " yeman," 13 
July 1.351, proved 5 September 1552. My body to be buried in the church- 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 847 

yard of All Saints in Writtle. I bequeath for my tytbes and oblations 
negligently forgotten a cow or else twenty shillings in money, at tbe election 
of Mr. Vicar. Towards the reparations of the church twenty shillings. I 
will that twenty shirts and twenty smocks and forty bushels of wheat be 
given and divided amongst the poor folk in Writtle and Roxwell, and that 
same to be don by the discretion of the church wardens and two or three 
honest men of the parish. Elizabeth my wife to have all that my house 
and garden called the Swan, with the " Orteyarde " called the Safforn gar- 
den thereto belonging, and Calpat field and the " mede, orteyard " and gar- 
den, the barn and the barn yard now in the tenure of William Jervyes, for 
term of her life natural. After her decease I will the same to remain to 
George Pvnchvn mv son. And if the said George die without issue then 
I will that all the premisses remain to John Pynchyn mine eldest son and 
his heirs forever. To the said Elizabeth my wife two of my best beds, 
with all things belonging to them, the bed in the wardens chamber, with 
the appurtenances thereunto belonging, except and reserved. To the said 
Elizabeth forty pounds in money, to be paid her by six pounds thirteen 
shillings four pence* yearly until it be paid. To the said Elizabeth " tenue 
fearme able kyne and fortye Ewyes " of two or three years age, a dozen of 
silver spoons next the best, the best salt saving one, a goblet, a little silver 
pot. a dozen of pewter platters, a dozen of pewter dishes, eight saucers, six 
pottingers. six " coysskous," that is to say, two of the best, two of the 
second and two of the " redde," a carpet, the best saving one, the bed- 
steddles, the counter and the "cheestes that been nowe at the Swanne," 
painted clothes for hanging, the best that she can choose, saving them that 
be in the wardens chambers, a cupboard, the best saving one, two brass 
pots, two brass pans, two kettles and two postnets, and of everything else 
touching household and not before named such part as may be spared, the 
house for my son first being furnished of that it shall need. Provided 
always that if my said wife will not be contented and agreed to take in the 
name of her third the house and lauds above expressed which I have given 
her for term of her life together with nine pounds of money to be paid 
yearly during her said life, that is to say, out of the lands I have given 
Edward my son five pounds by the year and out of the lands that I have 
given George my son forty shillings by the year and out of the lands that 
I have given Henry my sou other forty shillings by the year, but refusing 
the same, which I trust she will not do, will ask, demand and claim the 
third of my lands contrary unto my meaning and contrary unto her promise 
made unto me in that behalf, to the trouble, vexation and hindrance as well 
of my children to whom I have given my lands as also of other to whom 
I have sold some lands, then I will that all and every gift, bequest or legacy 
before mentioned be clearly void and stand as nought. And if she be con- 
tented &c. then she shall stand bound to discharge my lands of the said 
third by all such ways and means as shall be devised by mine executor or 
his learned counsel before the legacies before written be delivered unto her. 
Whereas I do intend to give, as beneath doth appear, an house to Richard 
Allyn. my wife's brother, another house to Edmund Church's wife, another 
house to Grove's wife, my said wife'- sisters, if my said wife do claim, ask 
or challenge the third of my lands, contrary to my meaning and to her 
promise, then I will that all such gifts to her said brother and sisters, of 
houses as abovesaid, shall likewise be void, frustrate and nought. To Ed- 

* See foot note on page 114. This sum is equivalent to ten marks. 



848 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

ward Pynchyn my sou my house, with orchard, garden and dovehouse 
called Skygg's and Tumor's, with Skygg's field, Bridgemead and Chere- 
mead at the end of Bridgemead, windmill field, Clement's field next unto 
the windmill, the little " brome " and all the little crofts in Widford parish, 
hy the little " brome and by yonde " the same that divideth the parishes of 
Writtle and Widford, with all the crofts lying together towards " Byffortye 
amedynge by yonde" Skygg's gate on the right hand as we go to the 
watermill on this side Adam Salmon's u pyghtell," and a " pyghtell " that I 
bought of Ramsall lying right over against Skygg's wall, upon this condi- 
tion, that he shall pay his mother yearly five pounds out of the same lands 
during her life. If he die without issue all these lauds &c. shall remain to 
John Pynchyn, my eldest son, aad his heirs forever. To George, my son, 
my tenement called Hasylls, with the lands lying and adjoining to the 
same, " that ys to say Bocho" Croofte ffoosters Croofte norryes mede, other- 
wyes callid Swanne mede and a Croofte and a mede late belonging to au 
Obite aud bought of Mr. Celye as they lye all togyther in lenngith bytwene 
the Ryver that rynneth from Wryttell bridge towardes lordes myll and the 
same that leadeth frome Wryttell to Loweford bridge, one headde abut- 
tynge upon the same tenemets callid Hasylls and thother hedde abuttynge 
upon a mede of Penny fathers nowe in the tenure of Mr. Bygges, and 
Loweford Leaf and Bryckes Brydge meade with all the reentes comynge 
into the said Hasylls," upon similar condition to pay out of these lands forty 
shillings a year to his mother &c. If he die without issue all the said lands 
to remain to John mine eldest son. To Henry, my son, my tenement and 
garden called the " Sterre," now in the tenure of Prentyze, three crofts of 
arable land and a mead thereto belonging lying all together at Cowbridge 
nigh unto " Patcho" Foorde," a mead at Cowbridge now in the tenure 
of Thomas Argoo and two crofts late belonging unto the Chapel Chauntry, 
whereof one 1 do occupy &c and the other is now in the tenure of Richard 
Asser, and the crofts at " Tonstrete and Harvies hoopes " at Oxney Green, 
&c. (upon similar condition of payment of forty shillings a year to his 
mother). Remainder, as before, to son John. The tenement called Dun- 
mowes, now in the tenure of Reede the wheelwright, the tenement wherein 
mother Brewer now dwelleth and the little house adjoining wherein Ayre 
sometime dwelled (other lauds) two crofts, whereof one I bought of late 
M r . Pawne and his wife and Mr. Thomas Byddell their son and the other 
I bought of Thomas Byddell uncle unto Thomas Byddell before named, 
shall be sold and the money thereof coming equally divided between my 
two daughters Agnes Pynchon and Margery Pynchon and paid them at 
their full age or day of marriage. If not sold for so much as it is worth 
then the rents thereof coming to be equally divided between them. I will 
that Dennys Pynchyn my daughter have all these lands and tenements 
that I bought lately of Mi-. Manne and his brothers, now in the tenure and 
occupation of John Squyor. Remainder to John mine eldest son. To 
Joane my daughter, now Brytton's wife, my tenement at the church gate 
late my brother Borrell's and wherein my said brother dwelled. To Emme 
Bivtton, the daughter of the said Joane, the tenement next adjoining to 
the same, wherein Roydon the shoemaker now dwelleth. To Joyce Pyn- 
chyn my daughter, now the wife of John Athye, my tenement on the 
North side of Greeubury wherein John Clerke now dwelleth. To Eliza- 
beth Athye, her daughter, the tenement next adjoining, wherein Thomas 
Smythe now dwelleth. To Elizabeth Pynchon, the daughter of John Pyn- 
chon and Helyn his wife, my two tenements, late Salmon's, wherein John 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 849 

Newton and Thomlyn now dwell. To the same Elizabeth the land called 
Cookes or Cockes in Roxwell, bought of M r . Browne (and other land), 
will that two tenements adjoining llasylls and two on the N. end of Green, 
bury shall be the poor's forever, and my executor, and after his decease the 
church wardens, shall place in the said houses such person or persons as 
they shall think good, there to dwell without any rent therefore to be paid. 
I will that Tliomas Badcock and Joanne his wife have all the house wherein 
he now dwelleth, called Skygg's and Tumor's, with all the lands I have 
given Edward Pynchyn my son, from the Feast of St. Michael the Arch- 
angel next after my decease unto the end and term of ten years next fol- 
lowing, if they do live so long, paying therefor yearly thirteen pounds, &c. 
To Richard Allen, my wife's brother, my tenement and garden at the 
North end of the town, where Gregory Joyce now dwelleth. But if his 
sister, my wife, do refuse the portion I have appointed her &c. then this 
gift be made void and staud for nought. To Edward Church and Agnes 
his wife, my wife's sister, and their heirs my tenement wherein Cocks now 
dwelleth, upon the same condition. To Robert Grove and Joanne his wife, 
sister also to my wife, &c. the tenement wherein Rose now dwelleth, upon 
upon the same condition. To William Plowright the tenement where 
mother Lukes now dwelleth, to give and to sell. To Thomas Plowright 
the tenement where Mauuselld the miller now dwelleth, to give and to sell. 
To Joanne Plowright the tenement where Roger the weaver now dwelleth, 
to give and to sell. To Mary Plowright the tenement where Brette the 
carpenter now dwelleth, to give and to sell. I will that the tenement next 
unto Peter Brewer's, where the weaver now dwelleth, be sold and the 
money thereof coming be distributed amongst my servants, by discretion of 
John Pynchon my son. Sundry small gifts to John Genyns and his wife 
and William Genyus (a godson) and every other of their children. To 
Margery Kinge the wife of John Kinge and to Lettys Kinge the wife of 
Robert Kynge. To William Kynge the son of John Kinge and to William 
Kynge the son of Robert Kinge, to every of them a silver spoon. Certain 
other bequests to members of the Plowright family. To every of my 
daughters Agnes, Margery and Dennyce so much household stuff as shall be 
worth three pounds in money, at their election. To Richard Dakyn, clerk, 
three shillings four pence in money. The residue of all my lands and 
goods herein not given nor bequeathed I give and bequeath unto John Pyn- 
chon mine eldest son, whom I make and ordain my sole executor &c. And 
my brother Richard Everard and my cousin, Robert Kinge my supervisors 
and for tlieir pains herein to be taken I give unto either of them ten shil- 
lings &c. 

Wit: William Harper, clerk, Rychard Dakyn, clerk, John Jenyns and 
Thomas Badcocke. Horn, 47 (Consistory Court of London). 

[The Warden's chamber mentioned above was probably the official home of 
the Warden of the College of St. Mary; of Winton, commonly called New Col- 
lege, Oxford, on the occasion of his business visits. A part of the endowment 
of New College consisted of the landed property of an alien Priory, located in 
Writtle, whose estates were scattered through Essex, more particularly toward 
the east, and in the neighborhood of Bradwell on the Sea, about twenty miles 
distant on the English channel. These building's and lands at Writtle were pur- 
chased by William of Wykcham, Bishop of Winchester, and founder of New 
College, < Oxford, and, together with the livings of Writtle and Roxwell, given to 
the College. The chapel, chantry and obit are specified in the text. As one of 
the principal functions of these Priories was to look after the poor and to-.en- 
tertain strangers, it is not unlikely that a hostel was maintained for this pur- 



850 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

pose after the Priory estates came into the possession of the College, and passed 
into the hands of the Pynchons, who seem from these wills to have been for 
several generations the lessees of large portions of the College property. That 
for several generations they took a special interest in New College, Oxford, as 
is shown by gifts and the education of their sons, is evident from the succeed- 
ing wills. About four miles west of Writtle there is another property called 
the Warden's House, probably on College land. Writtle lies a mile west of 
Chelmsford, a place of some importance, upon the Eastern Counties R. R., 
twenty-six miles from London. The church, which is pleasantly situated upon 
the village green, is very beautiful, and bears the impress of the architectural 
genius of William of Wykeham. The chancel is nearly filled with the monu- 
ments and memorial tablets of the Pynchon family. 

Springfield is situated nearly a mile to the north-northeast of Chelmsford. 
This also is a picturesque village, and has a very ancient church with a low, 
square tower, inscribed beneath the battlements : " Prayse God for all the good 
Benefactors." There are some fine brasses in the interior commemorative of the 
Tyrrel family. There is a tablet on the wall of the vestry-room with the name 
of William Pynchon inscribed upon it as one of the Church Wardens, dated 
1G24. This is the William Pynchon who was one of the original patentees of 
the Massachusetts Bay Company, and who six years later assisted, in 1630, in 
bringing that charter to America, a memorable and somewhat hazardous under- 
taking.— T. R. P.] 

John Pinchon of Writtle. Essex, gent. 10 November 1573 proved 11 
December 1573. My body to be buried in the church of Writtle. To the 
reparations of the church twenty shillings. To the poor of Writtle three 
pounds six shillings eight pence. And as touching all my lands and tene- 
ments within the parishes of Writtle. Bradwell near the !Sea, or elsewhere 
in the County of Essex, I will that Jane my wife have and enjoy all the 
same during her natural life, upon condition that she bring up my children 
until their full ages or days of marriage, and upon condition also that she 
pay yearly unto William Pinchon, my eldest son, at his full age, so much of 
annuity or yearly rent as. together with the revenue of my copy holds and 
customary lands in Bradweli, shall amount unto the yearly value of twenty 
pounds, and that she pay unto John Pinchon, my second son, and to Edward 
Pinchon my third son, at their several ages, to either of them one yearly 
rent or annuity of ten pounds, and to Elizabeth my daughter, at the day of 
her marriage, five hundred marks, so that the said Elizabeth, my daughter, 
do make to my wife, mine executrix, and mine heirs a good and sufficient 
release in the law of all her right and title that she the said Elizabeth hath 
or ought to have to Cookes lands in Roxwell and to all the profits and rents 
due unto her since my father's death; and also upon condition that she, my 
said daughter, upon request, shall release unto John Newton and his heirs 
and assigns forever all such right, title and interest as she might have or 
claim by any legacy or gift of my late father, her grandfather, of aud in 
certain tenements by me to him. the said John Newton sold. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto John Pinchon, my second son, all those 
my lands and tenements called Whelers, &c. in Wikestreet, now in the 
several tenures &c. of Robert Tunbridge and John Thornton, and also of 
one field called Ltiwfford, near unto Lowff'ord bridge, containing twenty 
acres or thereabouts and now in the tenure &c. of John Aware, gent., to 
have ami to hold &c. after the decease of Jane my wife; remainder to 
Edward, my third son, then to my right heirs. I give to Edward, my third 
son, my lands and tenements called Skigges and Tumors, now in the tenure 
&c. of John Dockley, aud the great brome and meades thereto belonging 
in the tenure of Thomas Reede's widow, and a croft of land called Clovil- 
hill Croft lying at Byfortie and the hoopes called Challfe hoopes now in 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 851 

the tenure of Hopkin, after the decease of my wife; remainder to John, 

my second son, then to my right heirs. Certain other lands &c. to my wife. 
If my three sons do die without issue of their bodies lawfully begotten 
then I do give and bequeath all my lands and tenements to Elizabeth, my 
daughter, and her heirs forever. 

Item, I do give all those my lands in Shenfield, which I lately bought of 
old Symonde deceased, to George Mannffield and Denis his wife, my sister, 
&c, remainder to the right heirs of the said Denis. As for my farms of 
the parsonages of Writtle and Roxwell and of the manor of Esthall and 
Shellmarshe and Garlsmondes marshe I will that Jane my wife have, take 
and receive the profits of every of them and the stock during her natural 
life, paying the yearly rents and doing all other things which I and mine 
assigns are bounden by the several leases to do &c. The residue of the 
term I cive to William Pinchon mine eldest son &c. To my singular good 
Master Mr. Doctor White, warden of the new College of Winchester in 
Oxford, my best gelding, I mean that he make his choice, or else ten pounds 
in money, at his like choice, most humbly beseeching him that, as he hath 
been always special friend and great good master to me and mine in my 
life, so he will continue the like to my wife and my poor children when I 
am ijone. To my very loving friend Mr. Bedell, for a remembrance, a ring 
of gold of the weight of forty shillings. I give for like remembrance 
uuto my loving friend M r . Tatem, the Vicar of Writtle, my best gown. 
The residue of my goods and chattells to Jane my wife whom I do make 
and ordaiu my sole executrix ; and my special good brother in law M r . 
Peter Osborne my supervisor, to whom I do give, for a remembrance, a 
ring of gold of the weight of three pounds six shillings eight pence. 

Md. the saied will is written with my owne hand in five Pagines of Pap 
/And everie Pagin subscribed with my ue owne hand/ Per me Johem 
Pinchon. Peter, 38. 

[Jane, the wife of the above-mentioned John Pynchon, was the daughter of 
Sir Richard Empson, of Northamptonshire, who was beheaded at London on 
Tower-hill, Aug. loth, 1510, in the early part of the reign of Henry 8th. From 
this date the Pynchon arms are quartered with the Empson on the monuments 
in the chancel of Writtle Church. Mary, another daughter of Sir Richard 
Empson, married for her second husband Edward Bulstrode of the ancient 
family of the Bulstrodes. of Bulstrode Park, County Bucks, not far distant 
from Windsor, and in the immediate neighborhood of Horton and Wraysbury. 
Bulstrode Whitlocke was of this family. 

Doctor White mentioned above was Thomas White, D. C. L., Warden of St. 
Mary's College of Winchester at Oxford, commonly called New College, ap- 
pointed Sept. 17th, 1553. He was educated upon the foundation of Winchester 
School, as Mas also Archbishop Chiehele, and held many distinguished posi- 
tions. He died June 12th, 1588, and was buried in Salisbury Cathedral. — T. R. P.] 

Edwakd Bell of Writtell, Essex, gen*., 20 November 1576, proved 
18 February 1576. Mentions wife's mother Mrs. Philipp Rutter. Wife's 
sister Jolnin Hardince. My brother Thomas Wilbore and my sister his 
wife. Brother Philip Wilbore. Cousin Thomas Pagitt. Brother James 
Bell. The poor of Newlaud in the County of Gloucester. Uncle William 
Matthewe. Sister (by the mother's side) Dorothy Marshe and her children. 
Brother William Freud's children. Sister Alice Hagett and her children. 
Cousin Thomas Hall. The school and almshouses by me begun at New- 
laud. Brother Henry Marshe (husband of Dorothy). My daughter Anne. 
Sou Edward. Youngest son James Bell. Wife Margaret. My eldest son 



852 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

William Bell. To Mr. Edward Pynchon. To Edward Pynchon the son 
of John Pynchon deceased and to his brother John Pynchon. 

Daughtry, 8. 
The same will was registered again in Langley, 14. 

Thomas Wilson Esq. one of the Principal Secretaries to our most dread 
Sovereign Lady Queen Elizabeth and one of her Highness Most Honourable 
Privy Council, 19 May 23 Eliz : proved 9 July 1582. To be buried in Saint 
Katherine's church without any charge or pomp at all. My very good 
and loving friend Sir Francis Walsingham, knight. My brother in law 
Sir William Wynter, knight. Matthew Smythe Esq. my cousin. My 
house at Edmonton and my lands there. My lands, tenements &c. in the 
Co. of Lincoln wherein I have any estate of inheritance. My daughter 
Mary at marriage or at twenty one years of age. My daughter Lucrece at 
marriage or twenty one. My son Nicholas Wilson to be sole executor. 
My overseers (Walsingham, Wynter and Smythe) shall take a straight 
accompt of my brother Godfrey Wilson touching his dealings in mine affairs 
at Durham, and finding him to have dealt honestly to give unto him one 
hundred pounds, or else to give him nothing. Tirwhite, 32. 

Jane Wilson of Writtle widow, late the wife of the Right Hon. 
Thomas Wilson Esq., one of Her Majesty's principal Secretaries, deceased, 
her will made 10 November 1587, proved 14 February 1587. My body to 
be buried in the church of Writtle. I give and bequeath to William Pin- 
chon, my eldest son, all my lands and tenements in WrittLe, Roxwell, 
Bradwell near the Sea, or elsewhere in Essex, and all my leases of the 
parsonages of Writtle and Roxwell and of the manor of East Hall in 
Bradwell aforesaid, upon condition he pay to John Pinchon my second son, 

pounds. I give to Edward Pinchon my youngest son my lease which 

I had and purchased of Ashely, gent., of a messuage &c. in Lon- 
don near unto the Duke of Norfolk's place, sometime, and belonging there- 
unto (he to make a release of his rights in certain lands). The residue to 
son William Pinchon whom I make my sole executor. 

In a codicil (without date) the testatrix specified certain gifts which had 
been left blank in her will. To her son John she willed three hundred 
pounds &c. and she named as overseers the Right Worshipful her loving 
brother " Mr. Osborne of the Excheker " and her very good friend Mr. 
Home dwelling in Gratious Street. Rutland, 11. 

Ralfe Evered of Kingsworth, Herts., gent., 15 February 31" Eliza- 
beth, proved 2 June 1589. I give to Elizabeth my wife, all my lands and 
tenements in Broomefield and Writtle in the Co. of Essex to hold for life, 
doing no waste, and all my lands and tenements in Beuington, Herts., to 
hold for life &c. 

Item, my will and mind is that if it happen any other my lands and ten- 
ements in the Co. of Essex or elsewhere to descend and come unto Raphe 
my son after my decease and after the death of Elizabeth Pynchion my 
mother or Mary Evered my grandmother, then I will that the said Eliza- 
beth my wife shall also have the said lands and tenements towards the good 
education and bringing up of my said son Raphe in learning during his 
minority, if the said Elizabeth my wife do so long live. I give unto Joaue 
Evered and Anne Evered, my sisters, to either of them twenty marks, to 
be paid within two years after my decease, if they happen at that time to 
be of the age of eighteen years ; if not then at their age of eighteen. To 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 853 

Mary Evered my sister ten pounds, within one year &c. To Andrew Gray 
Esq. my master, fifty shillings, to buy or make him a ring. To Elizabeth 
my mother one pot or piece of plate of the value of five marks which I 
now have. To my cousin Urias Barker forty shillings (for a ring). To 
my cousin Anthony Evered forty shillings (for a ring). To my cousin 
Thomas Wale twenty shillings (for a ring). To Robert Younge five pounds. 
The residue to Elizabeth my wife and Ralfe my son whom I make executors 
of this my last will and testament. The said Robert Younge and Urias 
Barker to be supervisors. Elizabeth Upton a witness. Leicester, 52. 

Rose Pinchon of Writtle widow, late the wife of William Pinchon 
Esq. deceased, her will made 20 March 1598, proved 19 April 1599. My 
body to be buried so near as conveniently may be to the place where my 
said late husband lieth buried. The poor of Writtle and the poor of Pin- 
ner. My friends Mr. Edward Hunte and Thomas Baker. Pinner in the 
Co. of Middlesex where I was born. My brother Mr. George Redinge. To 
my daughter Elizabeth one thousand pounds lor and towards her advance- 
ment in marriage. To my daughter Jane eight hundred pounds at eighteen 
or day of marriage. To my son Henry eight hundred pounds at twenty 
one. To my son William eight hundred pounds at twenty one. To my 
son Christopher eight hundred pouuds at twenty one. My executor shall 
have the occupation, possession, use and profit of all my leases of the rec- 
tories and parsonages of Writtle and Roxwell and my leases of East hall, 
Garmondes marsh and Shell mershe and my leases of the watermill, wind- 
mill and pasture grounds in Writtle and Roxwell granted by the Wardens 
and Scholars of St. Mary College of Winchester in Oxford until such time 
as Edward, my son shall accomplish the age of twenty and four years, pay- 
ing such rents and performing such covenants as are reserved and comprised 
in the said lease: at twenty four the said Edward to enter upon the said 
leases and take the profits &c, remainder to Henry my son. I give unto 
my loving sister in law, the wife of my brother in law, M r . John Pinchon, 
three angels to make her one ring to wear in remembrance of me and one 
black gown. To my loving neighbors M r . Edward Hunt and his wife three 
angels to make either of them a ring &c. and to either of them one black 
mourning gown. My loving friend Thomas Baker. My cousin M r . Thomas 
Reydinge. My god daughter Johane Whitebread. Certain servants. To 
every of the children of my brother in law Mr. John Pinchon twenty shil- 
lings. To my uncle Mr. Edward Pinchon one black cloak and to his wife 
one black gown. To my uucle Mr. Henry Pinchon one black cloak. And 
I do forgive my said uncles all such money as they or either of them do or 
both owe me. My very loving friend Jerome Weston of Roxwell Esq. to 
be sole executor. Nevertheless my will, mind and intent is that if Edward 
my son after that he shall accomplish the age of twenty and one years will 
take upon him to pay my debts, discharge and pay my legacies which then 
shall be unpaid and do execute and perform all other things which my said 
executor is to pay, do and perform by force of this my will &c. &c. that 
then he shall enter and take the profits of all my said leases and of the 
lands, tenements and hereditaments in the same devised and have all other 
my goods &c. to his own use. If my said executor, Jerome Weston, shall 
refuse to take upon him the execution &c. then I ordain and make my 
loving brother in law M r . John Leggat my sole executor. And I do desire 
my loving brother in law M r . John Pinchon to be overseer, and for his 
pains to be taken do give unto him three pounds and one mourning gown. 

The witnesses were John Legatt, Edward Hunt, Edward Pinchon, John 
Willyams and Henry Glascocke. Kidd, 27. 



854 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Sir Jerome Weston, knight, of Roxwell, Essex, 28 December 1603, 
proved 21 November 1604. To my son William Weston one annuity of 
fifty pounds out of my manor of Barwick Hull in Essex, during his life. 
To my daughter Winifrede Weston eight hundred pounds at day of mar- 
riage or eighteen. To my daughter Margaret Weston eight hundred pounds 
at day of marriage or eighteen. I forgive my son in law John Williams 
such debts as he oweth unto me. And for that there are divers "imper- 
fect" reckonings between my son Sir Edward Pincheon and myself, the per- 
fecting whereof might unhappily be a cause of breach of love and concord 
which I most of all other things desire to preserve between my son Sir 
Richard and him, I have therefore by this my will declared what course 
my will is shall be taken herein for the better preservation of peace between 
them &c. Then follows the appointment of auditors of the account and 
referees to decide the matter ; their names Henry Glascock, William Love- 
day and William Courtman, gentlemen. My executors to be Sir Richard 
Weston my son and Sir Edward Pin<*heon my sun in law. A further devise 
to Anne Williams, his daughter, wife of John Williams Esq., of an annuity 
of ten pounds to be paid out of one annuity of twelve score pounds which 
he received yearly of Sir William Lee of Newman Regis in the Co. of 
Warwick, during the life of the said Sir William Lee. 

Proved by the two joint executors. Harte, 84. 

[Sir Richard Weston mentioned above, afterwards Earl of Portland, of 
Skreens, Roxwell, married Elizabeth, daughter of William and Rose Pynchon, 
and a sister of Sir Edward. Arms of Weston and Pynchon impaled at Skreens. 
— T. R. P.] 

John Pinchon of Springfield, Essex, gen'. '2 9 August 8 James, proved 
12 September 1610. To the poor of Sjjringfield forty shillings. All my 
houses, tenements and lands in and near Weeke Street in the parishes of 
Writtle and Bromefield, now in the tenure &c. of Thomas Eve and John 
Drane shall be conveyed unto Robert Robinson for such price and upon 
such conditions and covenants as the said Robert Robinson and myself have 
lately heretofore agreed upon. Provision in case of the bargain coming to 
nought. The money accruing to go for the payment of my debts and the 
advancement of my daughters in marriage and the performance of this my 
will. 

And I charge my son William Pinchon, upon my blessing, that so soon 
as he shall come unto his lawful age, or within short time after, that he 
either join with my executrix in the conveyance thereof or else consent 
unto the conveyance thereof either unto the said Robert Robinson or unto 
any other person or persons that will purchase the same of my executrix. 
Furthermore I will and devise that during the natural life of Frances my 
wife my two sons William Pinchon and Peter Pinchon shall have, receive 
and enjoy for their maintenance the yearly rents and profits of all my lands 
and tenements lying at or near Cookesaull Greene in the parish of Writtle, 
now in the tenure and occupation of William Crowe, William, my son, to 
have twenty pounds a year of the rents and profits thereof and Peter fifteen 
pounds to his own use. And after the decease of the said Frances my 
wife I give ami bequeath all my said lands and tenements at or near Cook- 
saule Green, both freehold and copyhold, unto my said son Peter Pinchon 
and to his heirs and assigns forever. I give and bequeath unto the said 
Frances my wife all my houses, lands and tenements in Springfield during 
her natural life; and after her decease I give and bequeath them unto my 
said son William Pinchon and to his heirs forever. My said wife to keep, 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 855 

maintain and bring up all my six daughters decently in good education 
until they and every of them shall have and receive the legacies and por- 
tions to them by me given in this my will. And I give and bequeath unto 
every of my said daughters, viz'. Amies Pinchon, Frances Pinchon, Jane 
Pinchon, Alice Pinchon. Isabell Pinchon and Susaune Pinchon, the sum of 
two hundred pounds apuce out of and with the moneys which shall he 
raised upon the sale of my said lands and tenements lying in and near Weeke 
Street aforesaid and out of all the rest of my goods &c. not devised in this 
my will. Twenty shillings to Andrew Gilbert my servant. The residue to 
the saiil Frances Pinchon, my well beloved wife, whom I name, constitute 
and make sole executrix of this my last will and testament, requiring her, 
of all love, to see the same performed and my children decently brought 
up. as my trust is in her that she will. My friend Humfrey Baldwin of 
Springfield to be overseer, unto whom, for his pains, I give ten shilliags. 

I lamer, 57 (Consistory Court of London). 

[This John Pynchon of Springfield was the father of William Pynchon the 
founder of Springfield, in New England, upon the Connecticut river, in Massa- 
chusetts. He -was educated at the University of Oxford. Matriculated at New 
College Dec. 20th, 1577, and took his B.A. degree April 6t*\ 1581.— T. R. P.] 

Memorandum, that in the month of October Anno Domini 1611 William 
Pinchon late of Writtle in the Co. of Essex gen 1 ., being sick in body but 
of good and perfect mind and memory, did make and declare his testament 
and last will nuncupative in form following, or in words of the like effect, 
viz', my will and desire is that my brother Sir Edward Pynchon shall pay 
all my debts and bring my body to the earth, and the overplus I give and 
bestow upon him, for he hath " bin " a kind and loving brother unto me 
and is best worthy of it. 

" Sententia pro valore test 1 . William Pinchion " &c was pronounced 23 
May 1G12, in a suit between Sir Edward Pynchon, knight, natural and 
lawful brother of the deceased, on the one part, and Jane Hone als Pyn- 
chon and Henry Pynchon, who claimed as administrators of the goods &c. 
of the said deceased. 

Commission issued 20 June 1G18 to Edward Pynchon, brother of the 
deceased, to administer according to the tenor of the will &c. 

Fenner, 45. 

Thomas Brett late of Terlingin Essex gen 1 ., 15 January 1615, proved 
13 November 1616. My body to be buried in the parish church of Brome- 
field, entering into the church porch where my father was buried. To Mr. 
John Hankyu thirty pounds during the minority of his three daughters, 
Bridget, Elizabeth and Johane Hankyn, i. e. ten pounds apiece, to be paid 
to each at day of marriage or age of twenty one. To John Cunigley and 
to Sara Cunigeley, the children of John Cunigeley of Polsted, twenty pounds 
to be paid to the said John Cunigeley, he to pay ten pounds to his two chil- 
dren, each at day of marriage or age of twenty one. To Matthew Lyther 
the younger ten pounds. To Giles Crane and to Mary his wife ten pounds. 
To my cousin John Porter my tenement called Philles, with the land &c. 
in Little Baddowe, Essex, which said tenement is mortgaged to Mr. Thomas 
Emerye of the same town. And I would earnestly desire the said Mr. 
Emerye to release the said mortgage, my cousin John Porter paying him 
whatsoever is due to him upon the same. 

Item, I do give, will and bequeath unto William Pinchon, son unto my 
sister Frances Pynchon, all that my tenement and lands lying and being in 



856 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Bromefield in the County of Essex, to him and to his heirs upon this con- 
dition that the said William Pinchou shall pay unto Anne Pinchon his 
sister twenty marks of lawful money of England, within one year after the 
said William Pinchon shall quietly enjoy the said tenement and lands. 
Also I give, will and bequeath unto Peter Pinchon, brother unto the said 
William, twenty marks and to Frances Pinchon twenty marks and to 
Jane Pinchon twenty marks and to Alice Pinchon twenty marks and to 
Isabel Pinchon twenty marks and to Susan Pinchon twenty marks, all to 
be paid out of the said tenement and lands by the said William Pinchon to 
his said brother and sisters above written if the said William shall quietly 
enjoy the said tenement and lands without any trouble or molestation. To 
William Howson the younger of Chelmsford, Essex, all my lands and tene- 
ments, both free and copy, according to the custom of the manor, lying and 
being in Witham in the Co. of Essex. To Matthew Lyther the elder my 
gelding aud all my furniture belonging to him, with my best boots. To 
Elizabeth Mall, late servant with M r John Hankyn, twenty pounds at day 
of marriage. To Elizabeth Wylie ten pounds. To the poor of the town 
of Stoke four pounds. To the poor of Broomefield four pounds, viz', twenty 
shillings every Christmas day after my decease until the said four pounds 
be fully paid. To Walter Lyther the son of Mathew Lyther ten pounds, 
with the yearly use and increase of the same, to be paid when he shall 
come and attain to the age of one and twenty years. To Alice Ayas the 
daughter of John Ayas ten pounds, Mathew Lyther the elder or Mathew 
Lyther the younger shall have the use of the said ten pounds uutil the said 
Alice shall intermarry or attain the age of one and twenty years. My 
mind and will is that Susan Ayas mother unto the said Alice shall have the 
profit and yearly use and increase of the said money until the time above 
specified. To Richard Rhodes, the writer hereof, forty shillings. To John 
Colman, Mathew Lyther's man, forty shillings. I do make and ordain my 
executors to be my loving cousin Mr John Porter and Mathew Lyther the 
elder. And all my goods and chatties unbequeathed, my funeral expenses 
being paid, I give and bequeath unto my cousin John Porter. And I do 
make Mr John Hankyn, minister of Stoke, supervisor. 

John Gollman (sic) and Richard Rhodes witnesses. 

Memorandum, I do give aud bequeath to Amie my daughter wife of 
Edmond Chapman Esq., over and above those goods of mine which she and 
her mother hath carried away, the sum of twenty two shillings in gold, to 
be paid unto her by my executors, or one of them, within six weeks after 
my decease, being lawfully demanded. And also I do give to Jane my wife 
one other piece of gold of twenty two shillings, with the residue of my 
goods which she hath already carried away. To the poor of the town of 
Chelmsford forty shillings which is in the hands of Richard Browne, Bailiff 
of Chelmsford. 

A Sententia pro valore of the above will was prouounced 13 November 
1616 in a case between John Porter and Matthew Lyther, the executors 
named in the will, on the one part; and Anne Brett als Chapman, natural 
and lawful daughter of the said deceased, on the other part. 

Cope, 103. 

Nuncupative will of Sir Edward Pinchon, knight, of Writtlein Essez, 
5 March 1626, proved 8 May 1627. First he said and declared that his 
debts should be paid out of his College leases; that his daughters should 
have two thousaud pounds; that the leases should be conveyed to Mr. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 857 

Hone and Mr. Christopher Pinchon whereby the said debts and portions 
might be paid. He gave to the Lady Weston a ring or piece of plate of 
five pound value, to Thomas Casbolt twenty pounds, to Sara Eve five 
pounds, to the cook five pounds, to John Fletcher ten pounds. He willed 
John Turneedge to be abated forty shillings yearly of his rent. To each 
of his other servants he gave forty shillings. To the poor of Writtle five 
pounds and of Roxwell five pounds. To M r . South vicar of Writtle five 
pounds. To M r . Leventrope ten pounds. To Jeremy Wdliams ten pounds. 
To William Pinchon of Springfield a piece of plate of ten pounds. To 
Mr. Hone five pounds and to Mr. Christopher Pinchon five pounds. And 
he nominated and appointed his son John Pinchon to be his executor. 

No names of witnesses are registered. The will was proved by John 
Pinchon the son. Skynner, 50. 

[A noble monument was erected to the memory of Sir Edward by his wife 
Dorothea Weston, the sister of Sir Richard Weston, afterwards Earl of Port- 
land, upon the north side of the chancel of Writtle Church, within the rails, on 
which are emblazoned the Pynchon arms, quartered with the Empson. This 
establishes the connection between these two families beyond all doubt. — T.R.P.] 

Henry Pinchion in the Co. of Middlesex gen'., 3 May 1630, proved 
2 December 1630. To be buried in the parish of St. Andrews Holborn. 
To the poor five pounds. To Joan Damm daughter of Mr John Damm, 
a cutler in Holborn, one hundred pounds. To Elen Damm wife of the 
said John forty pounds because she hath been ever careful of me. To 
Francis Damm son of the said John twenty pounds because he was ever 
willing to do my commands. To John Damm son of the said John teD 
pounds. To Elen Damm daughter of the said John ten pounds. To my 
brother Mr Christopher Pinchion a ring of gold to the value of five pounds. 
To my sister Jane Hone wife to Bartholomew Hoane five pounds to be 
bestowed in a ring or as she shall please. And if any man or woman shall 
justly demand any debt due to them from me I desire my executor to give 
any such person twelve pence in fuH payment of their debt. I give and 
bequeath to my loving friend Mr. Thomas Ryley, servant to Mr. Meautys, 
five pounds. And of this my last will and testament I constitute and ordain 
Mr. John Damm of Holborn aforesaid my true and lawful executor. 

Probate was granted as above to John Damm the executor named in the 
will, letters of administration of the goods of the deceased which had been 
granted to a certain Christopher Pinchion in the month of May last (as if 
the deceased had been intestate) having been revoked. 

Sentence for the confirmation of the foregoing will was pronounced 2 De- 
cember 1630 (testator being called of the parish of St. Andrews Holborn) in a 
case between John Damm the executor &c. on the one part and Christopher 
Pinchion and Jane Hone, wife of Bartholomew Hone, brother and sister of 
the deceased, on the other part. Scroope, 111. 

Dorothie Da vies the only daughter of Matthew Davies late Doctor 
of Divinity and vicar of Writtle in Essex, 13 April 1634, proved 24 Octo- 
ber 1634. Mary Davies, widow, my dear and right well beloved mother to 
be my sole executrix. Lands in Roxwell and Writtle, viz', my farm or 
tenement called Owsdon's, now in the occupation of Henry Sharpe. My 
capital messuage called the New House, the lands for the most part in the 
occupation of Francis Purchase. Edward Bogges the son of my beloved 
half brother. Christmas day my birthday. I bequeath the reversion of 
my house and lands called Newhouse, in the possession or occupation of 



858 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

my mother Mary Davies and the said Francis Purchase, unto Thomas 
Bogges son of the said Mary Davies my mother and my well beloved half 
brother. To Sir Thomas Elliott, knight, my uncle, twenty shillings to buy 
him a ring. To Edward Boosey and Jane his wife, my sister, twenty shil- 
lings apiece (for rings). To Edward, Mary and Elizabeth Boosey, son and 
daughters of my brother Edward Boosey Doctor in Divinity, ten shillings 
apiece. To Thomas Newburgh and Mary his wife my sister, now in Ire- 
laud, twenty shillings apiece (for rings). To their four children, by what 
name or names they be baptized, ten shillings apiece. To John Elliott 
gen', my uncle and to Anne Elliott his wife twenty shillings apiece (for 
rings). To Anne Elliott daughter of my said uncle twenty shillings to 
buy her a ring. To Mary Elliott the daughter also of my uncle John 
Elliott (the same). To Edward and Susanna Eliott, children of my said 
uncle John, ten shillings apiece. Item, I give unto John Pinchone my 
uncle and unto Hannah his wife tweuty shillings apiece in several to be 
paid to them and either of them to buy them and either of them a ring. 
To Hannah and Sarah Pinchone daughters of my said uncle John Pinchone 
twenty shillings apuece (for rings). To my aunt Elizabeth Young widow 
twenty shillings to buy her a riEg. To John Young her son twenty shil- 
lings to buy him a ring. The same to Elizabeth and Edward Young, 
children of Auut Young. To my well beloved kinsman John Lukyne my 
great English bible, Mr. Bilston's books and three silver gilt spoons which 
my god mother gave me. To Constautine Young, my aunt Young's son, 
one good book to be delivered to him upon demand. To John Pinchone 
son of my uncle John Pinchone one good book &c. To my kinswomen 
Alice Briggett and Jane Lukyne, sisters of my kinsman John Lukyne, one 
handkerchief apiece presently after my death. To Anne Cragge my white 
box now standing in the New house and one other box now remaining in 
the house of my uncle John Eliott in London. To John Collyn the sou of 
James Collyn of Chelmsford, my godson, twenty shillings. I do heartily 
desire my well beloved brother Edward Boosey of Willingall Spain, Essex, 
to be overseer &c. Seager, 87. 

Mary Pinchon wife of Christopher Pinchon, citizen and woodmouger 
of London, and wife and now executrix of the last will and testament of 
Maximilian Dancy late of London, merchant, deceased, her will made 
5 March 1650, proved 26 April 1651. Whereas the said Christopher Pin- 
chon and I the said Mary, his wife, by our Indenture of assignment, under 
our hands and seals, bearing date 19 January 1649, did grant &c. to John 
Symonds citizen and cutler of London and Miles Skinner of London mer- 
chant one Indenture of Lease, bearing date 30 November 1635, made and 
granted by and from Richard Russell of Rederith, Surrey, mariner, by the 
name of Richard Russell of Ratcliffe, Middlesex, mariner, unto the said 
Maximilian Dancy of certain messuages or tenements, wharves and other 
premises &c. in Rederith for the term of one hundred four score and nine- 
teen years from the date of the said Indenture at and for the yearly rent of 
one pepper corn payable as in and b}' the said Indenture of lease is appointed 
(the foregoing assignment was for the purposes of a Trust). Myles Skin- 
ner the surviving trustee. My daughter Mary INncv. My son Maximilian 
Dancy. My friend Mr. Thomas Perryman. Grey, 94. 

John Pynchon of Writtle Esq. 22 March 1650, proved 20 October 
1654. Lands held of the Warden and scholars of St. M«ary College of Win- 




GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 859 

Chester in Oxford, commonly called New College in Oxford. My uncle 
Sir Thomas Tempest, knight. My cousin John Tempest, his son. My 
wife Anne Pynchou. My lands in Bradwell juxta mare, Essex. My 
.laughters. Their mother my wife. My son if God send me one. 

Alchin, 453. 

[This John Pynchon, who died in 1654, was the son of Sir Edward Pynchou 
and his wife Dorothy "Weston, and the father o^| 
Bridget Pynchou, who married William, Baron Pel i * 
of Writtle for his second wife. He was buried in 
the chancel of "Writtle Church. Upon the memorial 
tablet which covers his body are engraved the ac- 
companying arms of the Pynchon family, with the 
following inscription: " Here lyeth the body of 
John Pynchon of Writtle Esq. son of Sir Edward 
Pvnchon of Writtle Kn't, who departed this life the 
80 th day of July, 1654 : aud also the body of Edward 
Pynchon Gent, son of the said John Pynchon Esq. 
who departed this life the 12 th of Feb'ry 1672 : and 
also Ann, wife of the said John Pynchon Esq r who 
departed this life ye 10 th day of May 1675."— T.R.P.] Pykchok. 

William Pynchon, of Wrasbury, alias Wyrardisbury, in the County 
of Bucks, gentleman, 4 October 1662, proved 8 December 1662, by John 
Wickens, special executor, under the limitations specified in the said will. 

My chief executor is at present absent. To Elizabeth, Mary and Rebecca 
Smith, daughters of my son Master Henry Smith, and to his son Elisha 
Smith twenty pounds apiece, to be paid by my son M 1 . Henry Smith at the 
time of their marriage, as he did unto Martha Smith, out of a bond which 
he owes me, of two hundred and twenty pounds; to my daughter Anne 
Smith the rest of the said bond (of 220 1 ') with the overplus of interest. 
To the children of my daughter Margaret Davis, of Boston in New Eng- 
land, deceased, videlicet unto Thomas, Benjamin and William Davis, ten 
pounds apiece to be paid by my son M r . Henry Smith. To my son Master 
John Pynchon, of Springfield in New England (a sum) out of the bond 
which he owes me of one hundred and six pounds, dated 15 April 1654. 
Whereas my son M r . Henry Smith hath promise to pay unto me his debts 
which have been long due to him in New England and a horse of his at Barba- 
does. for the satisfaction of an old debt that he owes me, in my Quarto Vellum 
Book, in page 112, I bequeath them to the children of my son Master 
Elizur Holioke in New England &c. To the poor of Wraysberie three 
pounds. Son M r . John Pynchon of Springfield in New England to be 
executor, to whom the residue, provided he pay to Joseph and John Pyn- 
chon and to Mary and Hetabell Pynchon twenty pounds apiece. Mr. 
Wickens, citizen and girdler of London, and Mr. Henry Smith of Wrays- 
bery to be overseers. Friend M r . John Wickens to be my executor 
touching the finishing of my administration business concerning the estate 
of Master Nicholas Ware in Virginia, whose estate is thirty pounds in a 
bill of Exchange to Capt. Pensax and about eighteen thousand of tobacco, 
in several bills made over by M r . Nicholas Ware to Capt. John Ware of 
Virginia &c. To beloved sister Jane Tesdall of Abington twenty pounds; 
to sister Susan Platl twenty pounds, as a token of my cordial love; certain 
clothing to Mary, Elizabeth and Rebecca Smith. Laud, 156. 

[The will of Master Henry Smith of Wraysbury, who married Anne, one of 
the daughters of the foregoing testator and" is mentioned in the above will- 
has already been given in my Genealogical Gleanings (ante, page 723). M 



860 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

friends in New England can give a better account than I of "William Pinchon 
himself and of his family connections in New England. As to his connections in 
old England and especially with the Pinchon family of Writtle the wills I have 
given speak pretty clearly. My friend Dr. Marshall writes me from Heralds' 
College that in both the Visitations of Essex now in the College (that of 1614 
and that of 1634) in which the pedigree of this family is entered it begins with 
John Pinchon and Jane his wife. So too does the Visitation of London of 1633-34, 
see Harl. So. Pub.). But the Visitation of Essex of 1612 published by the Harle- 
ian Society gives Nicholas Pinchon of London as the father of John. This can- 
not be true, as any clear headed reader will see who shall carefully examine and 
compare the wills I have given. Nicholas Pinchon undoubtedly belonged to the 
Writtle family for he ordered that a priest should sing in the church of "Writtle 
for his soul and the souls of his father and mother &c. for one whole year ; and 
he mentions his "cousin" John Pinchon dwelling in "Writtle. For "cousin" 
the most probable reading, in modern language, is nephew ; so the reference may 
be to that very John Pinchon with whom the pedigree starts in the Visitations 
now in the College of Arms. John died in 1573, and of his will I have given 
a large abstract. Let any one read it and compare it with the will of William 
Pynchyn of Writtle who died in 1552 and he cannot have the least doubt that 
John was the eldest son and heir of William. The latter calls himself " ye- 
man," while the son, who had risen in the world, calls himself gentleman. 
"William Pinchon, I suspect, was an inn-keeper who owned and occupied the 
Swan, in which there was a room called the Warden's Chamber, probably because 
the Warden of New College, Oxford, was in the habit of lodging there when he 
visited Writtle to look after the landed property of his College in that neighbor- 
hood. John Pinchon, the son, I would suggest, acted as bailiff or laud steward 
for the Warden of New College and held the lease of East Hall in Bradwell, the 
windmill and other properties of the College. William Pinchon named a daugh- 
ter Dennys Pinchon. John Pinchon referred to his sister Dennis as the wife of 
George Mansfield. William Pinchon gave to his son Edward certain property 
called Skyggs and Turnors, with remainder to John. John Pinchon bequeathed 
Skyggs and Tumors to his son Edward. William Pinchon, after making be- 
quests to two married daughters and their children, bequeathed to Elizabeth 
Pinchon, the daughter of John and Helen Pinchon, certain lands in Roxwell 
called Cookes or Cockes. John Pinchon gave his daughter Elizabeth five hun- 
dred marks upon condition that she should release her title to Cookes land in 
Roxwell and to all the profits and rents due since the death of John's father. 
William Pinchon also gave to the same Elizabeth certain real estate then occu- 
pied by John Newton. John Pinchon also required his daughter Elizabeth to 
surrender to John Newton all the interest which she might claim, by legacy or 
gift " of her grandfather," in certain tenements which John Pinchon had sold 
to the said John Newton. All this, I claim, abundantly proves my proposition 
that the John Pinchon who heads the pedigree in the Visitations of Essex 
in the College of Arms, as well as in the Visitation of London 1633-4, was 
not the son (a yonnger son at that) of Nicholas Pinchon, but was the eldest 
son and heir of the William Pinchon of Writtle who died in 1552, and that the 
nearest relationship which Nicholas Pinchon bore to him could have been that 
of uncle only. 

Another statement which I dispute is that Nicholas Pinchon was of Wales. 
I find not the least evidence to support this statement. On the contrary the 
evidence of his will points to Writtle as his early home and that of his parents, 
and this family name is found in Essex, and in the very next Hundred to Writ- 
tie, fully a century earlier. In Morant's Essex (vol. 1, p. 305 &c.) I note that 
certain lands in the manor of Barrow Hall in Wakering Magna were conveyed 
in 1407 to John Pyncherne, that in 1426 Robert Warenor and others granted 
their " maner of Banve Hall " to Thomas Pynchon and Alice his wife, and that in 
1458 Thomas Pynchon, son of the last mentioned, and Elizabeth his wife granted 
this maner and certain lands and tenements in Prittlewell, Canvey Island &c. to 
William Lawzell gen'. &c. Bradwell juxta mare, where the Pinchon family after- 
wards held the manor of East Hall by lease from the Warden and Fellows of 
New College, Oxford, was, again, in the very next Hundred North of the last 
and North East of the Hundred in which lies Writtle. In my opinion this is 
the neighborhood where one should look for the earlier generations of our 
Pinchon family. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



861 



Sometime ago I found in the Stowe MSS. at the British Museum (MS. 612, 
L. 63 b ) * the following pedigree, without dates :— 



JOH'ES STEPHEN — filia & heres Joh'is Atheward 

(or Altheward). 



Ric'us JStephcn= filia Campyn. 



1 Elizabeth, 
uxor Rici. 

Everard. 

Ric'us Everard. 



2 uxor 

Willi. Pinchon. 



Ric'us Ev 



verard. 



3 Johanna, uxor 
Stephen Sampforth. 



T 



4 uxor Thomae Young. 

(Male issue given, &o.) 



John Sampforth=Dionisia filia 
Rici. Everard 
de Waltham Magna. 



1 Joh'es Pinchon. 



T 



2 Edw. 
Pinchon. 



3 Henricus 
Pinchon. 



Will's 
Pinchon. 



2 Joh'es 
Pinchon. 



3 Edw. 

Pinchon. 



Joh'es 
Sampforth. 



Nich'us 
Sampforth 



Will's 
Sampforth. 



No dates are given in this pedigree, but from another source I learn that the 
Eichard Everard who married Elizabeth, daughter of Eichard Stephens gen 4 ., 
died (or was buried) 29 Nov. 1561. It might be worth the while for an expert 
specialist to folloAv this matter up. It looks as if the pedigree had been con- 
structed to .show the descent of certain property of the Stephen family through 

* The Stowe MSS. in the British Museum contain, in my judgment, one of the richest 
and most valuable heraldic and genealogical collections in the Museum. My attention was 
first called to them nearly ten years ago by Mr. Kensington, one of the well known officials 
in the MSS. Department. There was no index to them. The only guide to their use was a 
bound Catalogue such as was made up for the auction sale of these MSS. This as a rule, 
simply indicated that such and such numbers were genealogical and heraldic, giving but 
the slightest indications of the real nature of their content?. Only quite recently have the 
authorities begun to put these collections in order and, as I have understood, with a view 
to indexing them. The numbers of both books and leaves have been changed. Those 
given above are the new numbers. According to the old numbering they were MS. G56, 
L. 56 b . Up to the present time the only way to arrive at a knowledge of the contents of 
these volumes has been to go through them leaf by leaf, as I have done with most of them. 
I have vet to find the antiquary who knows much about them ; on the contrary, I have had 
the gratification of making known to most of my friends their genealogical value. Among 
them I found a pedigree of John Rogers the martyr which Col. Chester knew nothing 
about, and which differs somewhat from the pedigrees already known to that distinguished 
antiquary. Here also I found an account of the Dummcr family which I regret that I 
could not have come across in Col. Chester's lifetime that I might have called his attention 
to it. It was a petition of Edmund Dummer of Swathling in the parish of North Stone- 
ham in Southampton, with a pedigree attached, setting forth his claim to a descent from 
the ancient family of Dommcr of Dommer and indicating the line of descent. I made it 
known to Prof, and Mrs. Salisbury, and take it for granted that it has been noticed in their 
new volume of Family Memorials, which I understand has been recently published but 
which I have not vet had the pleasure of examining. I found too an excellent pedigree of 
the familv of Moo"dic of Garsdon and one of Dunch of Wittenham showing the ancestry of 
our Ladv Deborah Moody and her husband. A grant of arms to Hopefor Bendall of 
Milend, Middlesex, at once suggests Boston and Bcndall's Dock. A pedigree of Fairfax 
shows the intermarriage of Ann Fairfax with Major Lawrence Washington and afterwards 
with Col. George Lee. The Arms of Sir Richard Temple of Stow in the Co. of Bucks, K. B. 
and Bar*, would interest some of our Boston friends, as would also a beautiful collection of 
arms, without pedigrees, probably indicating Temple matches. There is a rousjh, torn and 
incomplete Pinckney pedigree. The best pedigree of Jekyll I have found I hope soon to 
make use of in mv account of the familv of John Jekyll of Boston, Massachusetts. I have 
extracted also a large pedigree of Tindall, beginning with Henricus Comes Lutzcnburgh 
(father of Henricus Imperator Germanic) and including the family of Sir John Tindall, 
one of whose children is thus described, viz*. " Margareta uxor Johis Winthrop ar. qui 
migrauit in novam Angliam." One of the curiosities in this collection is a roll of very 
rude and ancient wall paper, showing on the back of it the ancestry of Jesus Christ and of 
King Josiah. Another curious pedigree is that of the Greek Gods and the Titans. 

Henht F. Waters. 



8(52 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

the male issue of the four daughters and co-heirs of Richard Stephen. At any 
rate it agrees finely with my theory of the descent of the Pinchon family of 
Writtle from William Pinchon, and* is itself confirmed by the will of William 
Pinchon, who mentioned a brother Richard Everard. If true, however, it shows 
that the wife Elizabeth mentioned in that will was not his first wife and the 
mother of his sous, for she was evidently au Allen and had sisters Agnes wife 
of Edmond (or Edward) Church and Joan wife of Robert Grove. 

Besides the pedigrees of this family published in the Visitations of Essex 
and London, the only others I have seen here in print are those in Morant's 
Hist, of Essex (11-65), Gyll's Hist, of Wraysbury and F. G. Lee's Hist, of 
Thame. Morant deduces the family from Nicholas Pinchon of Wales, one of 
the Sheriffs of London A. D. 1532, but gives no evidence in favor of it, only 
referring to a pedigree which he describes as " now before us." He speaks of 
John Berners, Esq. as having sold the manor of Turges probably to the Pinchon 
family. If so there is not slightest evidence that Nicholas Pinchon had any- 
thing to do with it. In fact I have not found a bit of evidence to show that he 
owned any land at all, whether in Essex or elsewhere ; and I would ask why, 
since he made a will, did he not make a testamentary disposition of real estate 
if he had any? William Pinchon of Writtle, who was undoubtedly a kinsman of 
Nicholas and possibly his brother, did possess considerable landed property; 
and this, as we have seen, descended chiefly to his sons and especially to John, his 
eldest son and heir. The latter doubtless made large additions, and probably 
through leases from the Warden and Fellows of New College of their manor of 
East Hall and other estates which we know he held. These leases we have 
traced, through the eldest male line, to his great grandson John Pinchon who 
died in 1654. " 

The pedigree given in Gyll's History of Wraysbury also shows Nicholas as 
the father of the John Pinchon who married Jane Empson and died 2!) Nov. 
1573. This was undoubledly taken from Morant. It then continues the line 
through John's son William who married Rose Redding and died 13 Oct. 15:»2. 
We are told that William and Rose were the parents of Sir Edward (of Writtle) 
"who died 6 May 1625," Henry, who is described as of Wraysbury, Chris- 
topher and a Nicholas, win is also described as of Wraysbury in 1653. This 
Nicholas is given as the father of William Pinchon who went to Connecti- 
cut and returned and was buried 7 Nov. 1662. William's son John, we are told, 
was of New England and had a daughter married to Henry Smith. 

This, surely, is the wildest of guesswork. Some of the statements deserve to 
be called sheer nonsense. In the first place, Henry Pinchon is shown by the 
record to have been of St. Andrew's Holborn. In the next place William and 
Rose Pinchon had no son named Nicholas. According to the epitaph in Writtle 
church (see Morant) they had six sons, and we know just who they were, viz'. 
Peter, who was eldest son and heir at the death of his father, Johu, who was 
eldest brother and heir of Peter at his death, Sir Edward, who was eldest brother 
and heir of John, at the hitter's decease, Henry, William and Christopher. There 
was no Nicholas among them. Thirdly, William Pinchon of New England and 
Wraysbury could not have been a grandson of William and Rose Pinchon, for 
he was too old. He was three score years and ten at his death iu 1662. Now 
Peter, eldest son and heir of William (and Rose) died in his minority without 
male issue. John, the next brother and heir, also died a minor and without 
male issue, and at his death (1 June 40 th Elizabeth) his brother Edward, who 
succeeded as eldest brother and heir, was then a lad only seventeen years old. 
His young kinsman William Pinchon of Springfield (afterwards of New Eng- 
land) was then living a boy of six. Moreover Sir Edward Pinchon of Writtle 
who, we are told, died 6 May 1625, must have come to life auain to make his 
will (q. v.). We have only to note and compare these facts to show how ridicu- 
lous such guesses are. 

Merely noting that Dr. F. G. Lee's History of Thame contains the same old 
error (borrowed I suppose from Morant) of the descent from Nicholas Pinchon, 
let me now suggest the true line of ancestry of our William Pinchon. He was, 
I believe, that William Pinchon of Springfield to whom Sir Edward Pinchon 
bequeathed a piece of plate of ten pounds (see his will). This William was 
undoubtedly Sir Edward's cousin german, the eldest son and heir of John Pin- 
chon of Springhela (who died 1610). We have seen that he named in his will 
two sisters, Jan^ and Susan, which were the names of two of the daughters of 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 863 

John and Frances (Brett) Pinchon, and we know that he gave to that beautiful 
town which he founded in "Western Massachusetts the name of Spriugflelcl, 
undoubtedly in memory of his old home in England. His father, John Pinchon, 
was clearly the second" son of John and Jane Pinchou of YV little, as is shown 
by his possession of the lands &c. in Wike Street (see the wills of himself and 
his father). 

It may be well just here to insert certain notes gathered years ago in the 
Public Record Office, Tetter Lane. From my notes of Lay Subsidies in Chelms- 
ford Hundred. Co. Essex, I find that in the 39 th of Eliz : (1597) John Pyuchon 
gen*, was taxed for lands in Springtield, Avhilc Rose Pinchyu, widow, and Edward 
l'inchyn jun r . gen', were also taxed for lands in Writtle. Later I find that in 
the 23' 1 of James (I) the name of William Pynchou appears on the Subsidy List 
of Springfield, instead of his father's, and for the same amount (eight shillings), 
and again on the list taken the 4 th of Charles (I). 

Turningto my notes of Fines I get much more valuable information. Iu the 
Fines of Hillary Term 35 Eliz. (1592) I find the following :— 

Thomas Wale quer. and Henry Pynchou, gen. and Margaret his wife 
deforc, for certain premisses in Radwinter (Essex), with a warranty against 
the heirs of Margaret. 

This must be Henry the son of William and brother of John Pinchon of Writ- 
tie, whom his niece (by marriage) Airs. Rose Pinchon referred to in her will 
(1599) as then living. 

In the Fines (for Essex) of Michaelmas Term 37-8 of Eliz : (1595) I find : 

John Pynchou gen. quer. and Jasper Vessy and Margaret his wife clef, 
for oue messuage, one garden, one orchard, 30 acres of land, 6 acres of 
meadow, 20 acres of pasture aud 4 acres of woodland &c. in Danbury. 
Consideration 100£ sterling. 

Paschal Term 38 Eliz : John Pynchou gen. quer. and Robert Pease 
gen. aud Martha his wife, def. for one messuage, one garden, one orchard, 20 
acres of laud, 4 acres of meadow, 16 acres of pasture &c. in Springfield. 
Consideration 80£ sterling. 

Hillary Term 5 Car (I) Thomas Home quer. and William Pinchon gen. 
and Aim his wife, deforciant, for one messuage, one garden, one orchard, 
26 acres of laud aud 10 acres of pasture in Springfield. Consideration 
G0£ sterling. 

Here we learn, first, that Henry Pinchon was married (a fact not known 
before), and we get the Christian name of his wife; secondly, the exact year 
when John Pinchon of Springtield acquired his estate in that town ; and thirdly, 
the year when William Pinchon, his son and heir, sold that estate, and we get. 
in addition, the Christian name of William's wife. These last facts are of 
immense value; for I note that iu that very Term (Hill. 5 Car.) our Governor 
Winthrop was making conveyances of real estate, and we know that in that very 
year Gov. Winthrop made New England his home, and Avith him went a gentle- 
man of some importance named William Pinchon who founded our Springfield, 
and he too had a wife named Ann. All this, in connection with the mention, iu 
his will, of two of his sisters (to which I have already referred) makes our 
ease about as strong as circumstantial evidence can make it. 

We are now therefore prepared to construct a pedigree of the family, aud 
have prepared arable which will be found on the next page. 

It will be noticed that I do not, in this pedigree, indicate the exact relation- 
ship whicn Nicholas Pinchon of London bore to William Pinchon of Writtle, 
for, I confess, upon further consideration, it seems too doubtful. The ques- 
tion of their exact relationship hinges entirely upon the identification of that 
'• cousin John Pyuchon dwelling in Writtell " mentioned in Nicholas Pinchon's 
will. John, the son of William Pinchon, was probably living at the time 

i~<28-9). Nicholas Pinchon made that bequest, since, as we have seen, he was 
oil enough to be married and have issue before July 1551, when his father's 
will was made. But i> it so probable that he was anything but a mere child 
in 1528-9, and, if so, is it very likely that a mere child" would be described as 



PINCHON PEDIGREE. 

- PINCHON of Writtle. 



1 I 2 | 

.=Nicholas Pinchon=Agnes Parnell 



cit. and butcher 

of London. Will, 

15.13, mentions 

"cousin John 

Pinchon dwelling 

in Writtell." 



survived 
her hus- 
band. 



a si>ter 
of 
Nicholas 
Pinchon. 



1 2 
dau. of=William Pinchon=Elizabeth, da. 



Rich. Ste- 
phen, and 
sister of 
Rich. Kver- 
ard's wife. 



of Writtle, per'ps 

an innkeeper. 

Will, 1552, calls 

Richard Everard 

brother. 



of . . . ., called 
a sister of Hi- 
chard Alljn or 
Allen by her 
husband. 



T 



Edward. 



ard. William. Robert. J oh 



John. 



Edward, gets= da. 

Skygges and of 

Tumors with 
remainder to 
bro. John. 
Living 1599. 



George. 



living 
1699. 



Henry; 

living 

in 1599. 



^Margaret, 
da. of 

(see Fines). 



I I I I I 
Joane= Brytton. 

Joyce=John Athye. 

Agnes. 

Margery. 

Dennys=George Mannifeld. 



1 
da. of=Joh 
son 



Helyn, v, 
.... Named 
inwillofWil- 
HamPinchon 
her father-in- 
law. 



.t 



2 2 

ynchon of Writtle, eldest=Jane, da. and coheir=Rt. Hon. Thos. Wilson 



and heir. Probably bailiff 
for lands owned by New Coll.. 
Oxford. Held the manor of East 
Hull in Bradwell of New Coll. 
Died 29 Nov., 1573 (Inq. p.m.). 
Will names sister Dennys, and 
refers to da. Elizubeth as owning 
Cookes land in Roxwell since 
death of his father. 



Elizabeth 
gets Cookes land 
in Roxwell Irom 
William Pinchon. 



of Sir Richard Emp- 
son, knight. Will 
proved 14 Feb., 1587. 



Esq., LL.D. Married 
15 July, 1576, at Terling 
(P. R.). Will proved 
9 July, 1682. 



(Qu 

these 
two?) 



Elizabeth=GeofTrey Gates (or Gatts) 
of Bury St. Edmunds. 
— Jane=Andrew Paschal (or Pascall) 
of Springfield. 



William Pinchon=Rose, da. of 



eldest son & heir. 
Obt. 13 Oct. 34 
Eliz. (Inq. p. m.). 



Redding of Pinner 
Midd. and sister of 
George Redding. 
sons and 3 dans, 
(epitaph). Will 
pro. 19 April, 1599. 
.Mentions bro. John 
Pinchon, his wife 
and children. 



John Pinchon of=Frances,da. of 



Springfield. Gets 
lands, &c., in 

Weeke Street, 
Writtle, from his 
father. Inq. p.m. 
Anno IX.Jacobi. 
Will 1010, orders 
lands in Weeke 
Street sold. 



Brett and 
sister of Tho- 
mas Brett of 
Terling, whose 

will (1070) 
names her and 
her children. 



3 I 

Edward Pinchon. 
Gets Skygges and 
Tumors from his 
father. 



1 I 

Peter, son 

and heir. 

Be 15 yrs. 

in 1592. 



2 I 

John, brother 

and heir of 
Peter. Obiit 
incustod R'ne 
1» Junii A". 
XL Eliz. (Inq, 
p. m.) 



Sir Edward Pinchon=Dorothy, da. of Sir 



ot Writtle, knt., bro. 
ther & heir of John. 
Aged 17 yrs, at John's 
decease. Will 1027. 
Bequest to Wm. Pin- 
chon of Springfield. 



Jerome Weston, 
knt,, of Roxwell, 
who in will (1004) 
calls Sir Kdward 
Pinchon son in- 
law. 



John Pinchon of Writtle, Esq. 

Married and left issue. 

Will 1054. 



T 



Mary, uxor Walter 
Overbury, Esq. 

Elizabeth. 

Anne. 



Henry, 
obt. s. p. 
will 1030. 

William, 
obt. s. p. 
will 1012. 

Christopher 

married and 

had issue 

(see Vis. of 

London). 



Elizabeth, 
uxor. Rich, 
ard Weston 
aft. Karl of 

Portland. 

Jane, uxor 

Bartholo 

mew 

Hone. 



a 3d dau. 



1 



WILLIAM PINCHON 
of Springfield, E-sex; aft. of 
N. E. Returned to England. 
Buried at Wraysbury, Bucks. 
Will proved 8 Dec. 1002. Names 
sisters Jane and Susan. 



2 I 
Peter. 



I I ! 
A nnes. 

Frances. 



Alice. 
Isabel. 



Jane, uxor Susanna, 
.... Tesdall. uxor 

Piatt. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 8(i5 



>< 



my cousin dwelling in Writtell " ? To my mind such a description rather sug- 
gests a grown man or, at least, one nearly approaching maturity. On the other 
hand I have not seen elsewhere the slightest evidence of the existence of any 
other John Pinchou "dwelling in Writtell" than this very Tohn, the son of 
William Pinchou, Of course it is possible to assume that William Piuchon had 
two groups of children by separate matches and born a considerable interval 
apart, John Pinchou being the eldest born by the first -wife. In the absence of 
certain knowledge I must leave the whole matter as an open question. For 
the same reason 1 do not show on the pedigree tl.3 exact maternity of William 
Pinchon's children, although the little extract from the Stowe MSS. shows 
pretty clearly that John, Edward and Henry at any rate, were his issue by the 
daughter of Richard Stephen. 

Nor have I gathered any evidence to confirm the statement that Jane the 
(second) wife of John Pinchon of Writtle was a daughter and co-heir of Sir 
Richard Empson, knight. I take that statement fronTthe visitations. By the 
way, I notice that while Morant says that Sir Richard Empson was beheaded 
17 August 1509, Dr. F. G. Lee says he was executed 18 August 1510, a discrep- 
ancy of a year and a day. 

The marriage of the widow, Mrs. Jane Pinchou, with Secretary Wilson, 
Morant seems to doubt. And Ave should not gather from the will of the Secre- 
tary any evidence at all of a connection with the Pinchons, while his widow 
Mrs. Jane Wilson, though she describes herself as his widow, does not refer to 
his children or family in any part of her will. Now in September 1891, when 
I accompanied my friend Mr. Frank F. Starr into the County of Essex on a 
hunt after Goodwins, I was able to secure the following from the Parish Regis- 
ter of Terling : — 

Married 
1576, 15 July the R'. Worshipf 1 . Mr. Thomas Wilson Esq., Master of 
the Requests, to Mrs Jane Pinchin of Writtle gen'., will., p virt. dispens. 
concessae ab Edwino Epo. Lond. A . Dfii 1576 et A . Ri> ne . Eliz. XVIII. 

Mr. John Pinchon of Writtle in his will named a brother in law Mr. Peter 
Osborne and his widow, Mrs. Jane Wilson, referred to the Right Worshipful 
her loving brother Mr. Osborne of the Exchequer. Just how the relationship 
came about I cannot now say. Morant's Hist, of Essex (vol. i. p. 323) under 
So. Fambridge, gives some account of the Osborne family (whence the Osbornes 
of Chicksands, Bedfordshire) from which it appears that there was a Peter 
Osborne, born A. D. 1521, active and zealous for the Reformation, Keeper of 
the Privy Purse to K. Edw. VI, who granted to him and his heirs the office of 
Treasurer's Remembrancer in the Exchequer. In Qu. Elizabeth's reign he was 
one of the High Commissioners for Ecclesiastical Affairs. 

According to Morant, Edward the son of John Piuchon was knighted and 
died s. p. His father left him Skyggs and Tumors, but that may have been 
only a reversionary interest, since his uncle Edward, the brother of John, who 
inherited this property from his father (with remainder to John) outlived his 
eldest brother, as is shown by the will of Mrs. Rose Pinchon, who re .'erred to 
him as " uncle Edward " and still living and having a wife then living? In con- 
nection with this I have noted elsewhere that an Edward Pinchon is said to 
have married Catherine daughter of Thomas Bolstred. 

I have followed the Visitations in giving to John and Jane Pinchon two 
daughters, viz'. Elizabeth, the wife of Geffrey Gates, and Jane the Avife of 
Andrew Paschal. I believe hoAvevcr that Elizabeth, at any rate, Avas that 
daughter id' John by his first wife (Helyn; toAvhoin her grandfather left Cookes 
lands &c. in l.oxwoll, AA'hile as to Jane it is noticeable that Ave do not get any 
mention of her in Avills, especially that of her assumed mother. Nor have I evi- 
dence to Confirm the statement that Elizabeth, one of the daughters of William 
and Rose Pinchon, became the wife of Richard Weston, afterAvards Earl of Port- 
land, though I see no reason to doubt it. 

What relation Palfc Evered bore to this family and wdio the Elizabeth Pyn- 
chion Avas Avliom he called " my mother" I cannot say. 

Hannah, wife of John Pinchon, whom Dorothy Davies (1634) called "uncle" 
in her will, Avas, I have found, one of the daughters of Edward Elliot of Ncav- 
laud by Jane, his wife, one of the three daughters and co-heirs of James (J edge 
of Shenfield and Newland Esq. She had three brothers, Thomas (afterwards 



SQQ GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Sir Thomas Elliot), Edward, on whose goods adraon. was granted to his sis- 
ters Dorothy and Hanna, 14 May 1602, and John Elliot. Mrs. Pinchon's sister 
Dorothy was, I suppose, the wife of John Collen of Writtle, gen'., and another 
sister, Elizabeth, was married to Mr. John Yon»-e or Young of Roxwell. 

The Inquisitiones post mortem in the Public Record Office concerning the 
estates of thife family I have not personally examined, but in Add. MSS. 19985- 
19989, British Museum, beincr Jekvll's Collections for a History of the Co. of 
Essex, I find (B. 3, L. 119) that by an Inquisition held 4 Sept. XVIII Eliz ; it 
was found that John Pinchon Esq. died 29 Nov. A . 17 (?) Eliz: and William 
Pinchon was his son and heir and of the age of twenty years on the 25 th day of 
April last. 

By an Inquisition held 19 Dec. 35 Eliz : it was found that William Piuchon 
died 13 Oct. last and Peter was his son and heir and of the age of fifteen years. 

By an Inquisition held 4 July 40 Eliz : it was found that John Pinchon, brother 
and heir of Peter Pinchon, son and heir of William Pinchon, Esq., died in Ward 
of the Queen 1 June last and Edward was his brother and heir and of the age of 
seventeen years. 

Stowe MS. N°. 93 (old number) also contains an Alphabetical Table of Post 
Mortems, Essex Co. , arranged in different groups according to the different reigns. 
The first (small) group covers the reign of Henry VII, though I noted one 
which was taken 22 E. IV. Then comes a large group headed " Temp. H. 
Octavi, Virtute Bris." Next "Escaetriae Virt. Officii temp. H. Octavi." Then 
" Inq. capt. in Com. Essex temp. Ed. VI Virt. Bris." The next was headed 
" Maria et Ph'us et Maria." In none of these lists did I notice any Pinchons. 
In the next list following (a long one) which was headed "Inq. capt. temp. 
R'nae Eliz : " I found the three referred to above, i. e. that of John in the 18 th 
year, William in the 35 th year, and John in the 40 th year of that reign. Then 
follow two " Inq. Capt. temp. R. Eliz : Virt. Officii" (no Pinchons). The next 
list, headed '• Inq. Virt. Bris. temp. Jacobi Rs," contains one, that of John Pin- 
cheon, Anno 9 of that reign. This must be an Inquisition held after the death 
of John Pinchon of Springfield, the father of our William Pinchon of Massa- 
chusetts. 

All these Inquisitions (especially the first and last) should in my opinion be 
carefully examined by any one who purposes to make an exhaustive study of 
the history of this family. 

From my notes taken a few years ago from the Calendars of Fines I learn that 
in Hillary Term of 1653 William Pynchon Esq. was a plaintiff ("quer.") against 
Andrew Kinge and others " deforc." for real estate in Wyrardisbury, Co. Bucks., 
and again in the same Term against Jo. Bland Esq. and others, for real estate 
in the same place. This means of course that he was a grantee and the others 
were grantors of such property. I have not examined the Feet of Fines them- 
selves in these cases, but think it well to call attention to them. It was probably 
in that year (1653) that he settled clown in Wraysbury. I have no note of any 
Nicholas Pinchon purchasing land there in that year. I question the statement 
in Gyll. 

In conclusion I would say that I have spent a great deal of time, from first to 
last, over this problem, and my notes, I And, cover a good deal of space in 
these Gleanings, but I have by no means made an exhaustive study of the whole 
family. That I leave, as in all such cases, to the special enquirer, my own 
attention being limited to one or two doubtful links in the direct chain of ances- 
try of our New England family. I trust that in this respect the careful reader 
will admit that if I have not absolutely proved I have at any rate shown it to 
be altogether probable that our William Pinchon was that William Pinchon of 
Springfield (Essex) eldest son and heir of John Pinchon of Springfield, who 
died in IG10, that I have shown conclusively that this John Pinchon of Spring- 
field was the second son of John Pinchon of Writtle, who died in 1573, and, 
finally, that I have absolutely proved that tins John Pinchon of Writtle was the 
eldest son and heir of William Pinchon of Writtle, who died in ]552, and not a 
son of Nicholas Pinchon of London. Hkxuy F. Waters. 

William Pynchon of Wrasbury, Avhose will dated October 4, 1662, is printed 
on page 859, was the oldest son of John Pynchon of Springfield, and 
grandson of John and Jane Pynchon of Writtle. He was educated at Oxford, 
matriculating at Hart Hall, afterwards Hertford College, Oct. 14th, 1596, when 
he was eleven years old. It was then the custom to send boys to the Halls of 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IX ENGLAND. 867 

Oxford at au early age. It was, no doubt, here that he acquired his familiarity 
with Latin. Greek ami Hebrew, ami accumulated those stores of theological 
ami patriotic learning that he drew from later in life in writing his various 
works. He was in 1624 one of the church-wardens of Springfield parish in 
England. Married Anna Andrew, daughter of William Andrew of Twiwell, 
County Northampton. One of the principal projectors of the settlement of 
New England. A patentee ami assistant named in the charter of the colony of 
Massachusetts Bay, granted by Charles 1st, March 28th, 1G2S. Very active in 
the organization of the Company, and present at all the meetings in London ; 
also at the great meeting at Cambridge Aug. 2G, 1629, at which many of the 
assistants agreed to remove to New England " in case the whole government, 
together with the patent, were legally transferred and established to remain 
there." Sailed from the Isle of Wight March 29th, 1G30, in the fleet of three 
vessels that carried the charter over. In the same year the founder of Roxbury ; 
in 1636 the founder of Springfield ou the Connecticut river, upon the great 
Indian trail leading from the Narragauset and Fequot country, via the Westfield 
river, to the Mohawk country above Albany, so that parties of Indians were 
constantly passing his door in both directions. It was in this way that he be- 
came widely known and very influential among the various Indian tribes of the 
West, as well as those of New England. 

It was to him, and not to the Connecticut people, that the Mohawks sent, as 
proof of death, the scalp and hands of Sassacus the Pequot sachem who had 
fled to them for refuge after the destruction of the fort at Mistick. For many 
years, the name in common use among the Mohawks for the New Englanders, 
was " Fynchon's men," out of respect for their nearest New England neighbour 
at the mouth of the Agawam on the Connecticut, River, just as they named the 
Dutch " Corlear's men" out of respect for Antony Von Corlear, the first 
of the Dutch with whom they were brought into intimate relations. And, so 
deeply rooted was their esteem for him and his family, more than a hundred 
years after this, iu 1751, the chiefs of the Mohawks requested the Massachu- 
setts Government: "that Brigadier Dwight and the Colonel Fynchon of 
that day might be improved in future interviews, and as to Colonel Fynchon in 
particular they urged their acquaintance with his ancestors and their experience 
of their integrity." Sole magistrate and administrator of Indian affairs for all 
Massachusetts west of Wachuset mountain. In 1650 the author of the book 
entitled " The Meritorious Price of our Redemption." In 1652 returned to Eng- 
land. In 1653 bought lands in Wraysbury, County Bucks, near his Bulstrode 
relations in the adjoining parish of Horton, and directly opposite Magna Charta 
Island in the Thames, and the field of Runnymede. Died Oct. 29th^ 1662, and 
was buried in Wraysbury church-yard. His gold seal ring with the Fynchon 
arms engraven upon it is still in existence and the possession of one of his de- 
scendants in the line of primogeniture. His only son John Fynchon remained 
in New England, and from him are descended all who bear the name in America. 
— T.R. P.] 

Richard Fryer, citizen and fruiterer of Loudon, 15 December 1G86, 
proved 26 February 1687. Me mentions lands, messuages, tenements and 
hereditaments in the parish of Staines and in the parish of Raisbury, in 
County Bucks, which he had lately purchased of John Pinchon, the elder, 
and John Pinchon, the younger, of New England, gentlemen. His legatees 
are wife Frances Fryer, son Peter Fryer, daughter Susanna Peake, son-in- 
law William Peake. Mary, Johanna and Elizabeth Fryer, daughters of 
brother Robert Fryer, late of Old Winsor, County Berks, fisherman, deceased 
and sister Elizabeth Whittle, of Old Winsor, widow. Exton, 14. 

Luke Fawni: citizen and stationer of London, 11 February 1665 and 
again signed, scaled, published and declared 17 March 1665 (after several 
interlineations and erasures &c.) proved 29 March 1666. Imprimis I give 
and bequeath unto my kinswoman Mrs. Elizabeth Clement, living near 
Boston in New England, eldest daughter of my brother M r John Fawne, 
the sum of fifty pounds &c. to be paid into her own hands within four years 



868 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

after my decease, and to her son Fawne Clement the like sum (at one and 
twenty). To all the rest of the children which my said kinswoman now 
hath fifty pounds equally hetween them to be divided. To my daughter 
in law Jane Serjant twenty pounds. To my cousin Stephen Serjant, her 
son, one hundred pounds, at four and twenty, and thirty pounds more to be 
laid out iu putting him forth apprentice. To Jane Serjant, his sister, twenty 
pounds, in four years. To my kinsman Mr. Samuel Dixon one hundred 
pounds, in six months, and to his son Samuel Dixon twenty pounds at one 
and twenty. To my cousin Capt. John Cressett and his wife thirty pounds 
to buy them mourning. To Edward Cresset the younger fifty pounds and 
to Elizabeth Cresset fifty pounds and to John Cressett the younger and 
Joseph Cressett twenty pounds apiece, in two years. To my cousin Valen- 
tine Shuckbrowe and Bridget his wife ten pounds aud to her three children 
Jane, Sarah and Anne Youngers threescore pounds, equally to be divided 
between them in three years. To Valentine Younger forty shillings. To 
John Younger, Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, fifty pounds iu one 
year. To my loving cousins Mr. Jonathan Mathew and Bridget his wife 
and their children now living one hundred pounds, equally between them 
to be divided, in four years. To Benjamin Mathew fifty pounds in four 
years. To my servant Brabazon Aylemer ten pounds. Sundry other ser- 
vants and friends. My cousin Mr. Henry Browne and his wife. Cousin 
Elizabeth Cressett, daughter of Capt. John Cressett. To my cousin Sarah 
Browne thirty pounds and to my cousin Samuel Syinonds twenty pounds. 
The residue to my wife Dorothy Fawne, and I make her my said wife and 
my cousin Capt. John Cresset and my friend M r John Macook of London, 
stationer, my executors &c. Mico, 43. 

Dorothy Fawne of Hackney, Middlesex, widow, 15 September 1666, 
proved 18 October 1666. My brother Thomas Weaver, the son of Ed- 
ward Weaver the elder. William, Robert and Thomas Heatley the three 
sons of my sister Elizabeth Heateley wife of Gabriel Heateley, apothecary, 
deceased. The Company of Stationers. Mr. Thomas Heatley and his 
wife. Anthony Dowse, stationer. The residue to John Weaver son of 
Edmond Weaver the younger whom I make mv whole and sole executor. 

Mico, 141. 

[The following extracts from Smith's Obituary (Camden Society Publica- 
tions) are interesting in connection with the foregoing wills : 

1656 April 2 Mrs Fawne wife to Capt. Luke Fawne, bookseller in 
Paul's church yard, buried. 

1665 (6) March 20 Capt. Luke Fawne bookseller at ye Parrott in Paul's 
church yard died. 

From the records of Essex County (Massachusetts) I learned that Robert 
Clements was married unto Elizabeth Fane the 8 th of the 10 th mo. 1652. 

I also have the following note from the Registry of Deeds of Essex Co. 
(Mass.) B. 30, L. 38) : 

Robert Clement Sen 1 " of Haverhill in the Co. of Essex and Elizabeth Clement 
his wife, which Elizabeth was and is ye daughter of Mr. John Fawne formerly 
of Haverhill in New England, to our son Fawne Clement of Newbury all and 
singular ye sum or suraes of money to us or cither of us given or bequeathed by 
will as a legacy to us or either of us and more especially referring to a legacy 
given by Mr. Luke Fawne formerly of ye city of London, Stationer, or by any 
other person or persons whatsoever. 5 March 1707 (8). 

Wit : James Sanders, Joseph Kingsbury. 

The following memorandum also I took from Essex Co. Deeds, B. 37, L. 152 : 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN" ENGLAND. 869 

A memorandum belonging to Fawne Clements; recorded 15 th Septem- 
ber 1720. 

M™ Clements Daughter of M r John Fawne & Elizabeth Fawne w ch 
Elizabeth Clements was nese to one Luke Fawne a stationer in Paul's 
Church Yard at ve si<rne of y e Parriot who Died a little before y e fire & 
gave Mrs. Clements £300 & Left it in y e hands of one M r John Cresitt in 
Charter house Yard in London & M r Edward Clements at y e sigue of y e 
Lamb in Ab Church Lane & M r Edward Henning march' in Loudon & M r 
Jerrat Marshal in London. 

This Intelligence I had of y e Reverend M r Emmerson minister of Pas- 
cataqua — w ch he had of the Leiv' Governor Vaughn of Pascataqua. 
Boston May 7 th 1716. John Camell. 

Boston September 13 th 1720 y e aboves d John Campbell made oath y l by 
Vertue of y e abovementioned Relation w ch he Received from y c Reverend 
M r John Emmerson he Printed & advertisement of it in y e News Letter 
N° 629 May 7 th 1716. Samuel Lynde Justice Peace. 

Henry F. Waters.] 

John Oldfield of London, Esq., 30 — 1656, proved 3 November 1657. 
To be buried in Creechurch, in the chancel where my beloved wife Kath- 
erine was laid, in the North side of the ehancel. To my daughter Elizabeth 
Cowper my house at Bow &c, and, for her maintenance, the lease of the sugar 
house in Billiter L;ine, London, which is clear forty pounds per annum. 
To my two grandchildren John and Ann Fleetwood, son and daughter of 
my daughter Katherine, wife to Col. George Fleetwood, I say to John 
Fleetwood five hundred pounds, to be paid to his father, now Sir George 
Fleetwood, upon security &c, and to Ann Fleetwood five hundred pounds, 
payable (as above). My cousin Elizabeth Ward. Richard Turvile my 
servant. My kinsman John Short, now with me. The poor of Bowe, 
where my house is, and of Katherine Creechurch, where I now dwell. 
Christ Hospital, for their poor children. The poor of Ashborne, where I 
was born. My brother William Oldfield. My sister Margaret Oldfield 
and her grandchildren, daughters of my cousin John Oldfield deceased. 
My son George Cowper Esq. to be my executor. And I desire my loving 
friend Richard Turvile and my cousin Simon Smith to be my overseers. 
And I give to Simon Smith ten pounds and to my cousin Martha Smith his 
wife ten pounds, to be paid to his own hands within three months after my 
decease. Ruthen, 452. 

[I suppose the above testator to have been the John Owfeilde of Asheborne 
in the County of Darby referred to in the will of Roger Owfeilde (Reg. 47, p. 
289, ante p. 730). See also will of Thomazine J: anson (p. 72-ij . The will of 
Symon Smith appears on p. 749. Col. George Fleetwood, otherwise called Sir 
George Fleetwood, was, I suppose, that regicide, one of Cromwell's lords, 
who is said to have died in America.] 

Samuel Owfeild of Gatton, Surrey, 6 December 1636, proved 10 
February 1644. To my wife Katherine all my lands, tenements and here- 
ditaments whatsoever in- the Realm of England. 

Proved, as above, by Dame Katherine Owfeild, the relict and executrix. 

Rivers, 46. 

[On the margin was written T"> Samuel Owfeild temp'e mortis suae D'ni Sam- 
uelis Oicfeild militis def. — H. F. W.] 

Dame Katherine Owfeild, widow relict and sole executrix of Sir 
Samuel Owfeild, knight, deceased, her will made 8 February 1043, proved 



870 GENEALOGICAL GLEANIN ;> IN ENGLAND. 

10 November 1664. Refers to indenture hearing date IG May 1637. 
Husband then known as Samuel Owfeild of Gatton. Surrey. Certain real 
estate in Gatton and other parishes in Surrey and in Thames Street, St. 
Beunet near Paul's Wharf and also at Paul's Wharf a id St. Peter's Hill. 
London, being late the inheritance of William Smith citizen and mercer of 
London deceased. William Owfeild, son and heir apparei t. Roger Ow- 
feild, second son. John Owfeild, third son &c. The saio Sir Samuel is 
since deceased leaving issue William (Roger and John since deceased) 
Samuel. James and Edward Owfeild his sons and also seven daughters (that 
is to say) Sarah (since deceased) Tomasine, Katherine, Anne (since de- 
ceased) Margaret, Mary ami Elizabeth. Brian Janson referred to. My 
said sons. My eldest daughter Thomasine Goodwyn. Reference to the 
wills of Roger Owfeild late of London, merchant, deceased, and of Thoma- 
zine Owfeild widow, relict of the said Roger. Bruce, 117. 

Anthony Radcliffi-; citizen and merchant tailor of London, 11 Feb- 
ruary 1 st Charles, proved 2r> June 1628. To my sister Dorothy Gerrard 
one hundred pounds, to be by her disposed and bestowed at her will and 
pleasure as she shall think best. To my sister Elizabeth Harvey the like 
sum of one hundred pounds and to my sister Anne Moulson the like sum 
of one hundred pounds. To my cousin Anthony Radcliff thirty three 
pounds six shillings and eight pence. To my cousin Parsons and his wife 
thirty three pounds six shilling eight pence. And the same to my cousin 
Elizabeth Radcliffe. Ten pounds each to my cousin Sara Shorter and my 
cousin Parsons, widow. Five pounds each to my cousin Chapman, my 
cousin Massam, widow, and my cousin John Pasfield. Bequests to the 
poor and to hospitals. Five pounds each to my friend Mr. John Moulson 
and his wife, Mr. Samuel Aldersey and his wife and Mr. Arthur Turnor 
and his wife. Forty shillings to my old friend and acquaintance Clement 
Cotton. The poor of St. Christophers parish and of St. Bartholomews by 
the Exchange. And I do hereby make, ordain and appoint my well beloved 
brother in law Mr. Alderman Moulson my sole and only executor. 

Then follows a Schedule, added 24 September 1627. In it he expresses 
nis desire that his body should be buried in the parish church of Harrow 
"where the Bodyes of my ffather and Mother and divers of my flfriends lye 
buried." My late sister Dorothy Gerrard is dead. I will and bequeath 
the sum of one hundred pounds to Sir Gilbert Gerrard kn*, her eldest son, 
or to his children, if he die before me. If my sister Flizabeth Harvey die 
before me her hequest to go to her children. My cousin Elizabeth Rad- 
cliffe is but weak and sickly of body. My cousin Anthony, her brother, 
and Parson's wife, her sister. 

Proved by Mr. Thomas Moulson the executor. 

Archd. of London, B. 7, L. 28. 

Mense Maij 1603 vicesimo sexto die emanauit comissio Edwardo Rad- 
cliff filio na u et ttimo Anthonij Radcliff imp, de Harrow sup, raontem in 
Com Midd ar def Hentis etc. ad admlstrand bona iura et credita dci def. 

etc. 

[Abstracts of the wills of Sir i nomas Mowlson ami Lady Ann Mowlson were 
gi ,'cii in tlic REGISTKK for January. 1893 ("///<• pp. G58, G59 ). The formerwill was 
written in 163G, 1 lie latter in IG57. These two wills have been the only sources up 
to date from which t lie family connections of Lad) Mowlson could be ascertained. 
The death of lu-r brother Anthony in 1028 necessarily precluded mention of his 
name in either of the above-mentioned instruments. .Mr. Waters, in furnishing 
the above abstract of the will of Anthony Kadclin'e. has therefore added another 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 871 

name to the list of relatives which has been gleaned from his contributions to 
the Register relating do this subject. It -will be observed that the testator 
leaves a bequesl to his •• sister Anne Moulsou," and that he appoints his " well 
beloved brother in law Mr Alderman Moulsou his sole and only executor." 
Three sisters are mentioned in this av ill — Dorothy, married to a Gerard, Eliza- 
beth, married to a Harvey, and Ann. Lady Mowlson. The Sir Gilbert Gerard, 
legatee in Lady Mowlson's will, is the son of Dorothy. Mr. " Cary Mildmay 
otherwise Harvey," mentioned in the same will, probably furnishes the con- 
necting link with Elizabeth. Anthony Radcliffe seems to have taken an interest 
in the parish of St. Christopher's, for lie leaves a bequest to the poor of that 
parish. His designation of the parish church of Harrow as the spot where 
the bodies of his father and mother ami others of his friends lie buried, fixes 
with sufficient accuracy the home of the family. — Andrew McFarland Davis. 

Lady Mowlson was related by marriage to prominent Puritans and patriots of 
her day. Her nephew, Sir Gilbert Gerard . married Mary, daughter of Sir Francis 
Barrington and first cousin of Oliver Cromwell and of John Hampden. Sir 
William Masham, in whose family two of our New England divines, Roger 
"Williams and John Norton, were chaplains, though at different times, married 
a sister of the wife of Sir Gilbert Gerard. Lady Joan Barrington, the wife 
of Sir Francis Barrington, was a daughter of Sir Henry Cromwell, and con- 
sequently an aunt of Oliver Cromwell, the Protector. John T. Hassam.] 

Sir John Morgan of Chillworth, Surrey, knight, 26 March 1621, proved 
4 April 1621. To my dear and loving wife all ray plate &c. Lands in 
Shalford and Albury. Surrey, and elsewhere. Wife to be executrix and 
brother in law Sir Nathaniel Rich, knight, and friends Sir George Stough- 
ton, knight, cousin James Elliott, Mr. George Duncombe of Clifford's Inn 
to be supervisors. To my daughter the Lady Anne Randall fifty pounds 
of the hundred and fifty pounds which my son in law Sir Edward Randall 
oweth me. To my nephew George Theoballs fifty pounds. To my cousin 
Thomas Anton my lesser bay mare. My friend Mr. Peter Phesant. My 
servant Robert Willoughby. My friend Mr. Thomas Davies. 

Proved, as above, by Dame Elizabeth Morgan. Dale, 32. 

Dame Emzareth Morgan, 28 November 1632, proved 22 May 1633. 
For her burial two hundred pounds; for a tomb for her and Sir John Mor- 
gan forty pounds. The silver voyder and the eight silver plates my Lady 
Wroth to have for life, and then after to M r John Sutherton. The rest of 
the plate to him. The jewel in ray Lady W roth's keeping she to have for 
life and afterwards to my Lady Warwick's daughter, my Lady Mandevill. 
One hundred pounds to cousin Grimsditch's children, my cousin their mother 
to have the benefit of it for life and then equally to the four daughters. Ten 
pounds to Elizabeth Browne (and certain linen). The poor of Lee parish 
and this parish Wonnersh and Shutfor. Sir Nathaniel Rich to be sole 
executor. To Nathaniel Browne, her sister's son, she giveth the benefit of 
two hundred pounds for and towards his maintenance and bringing up until 
he be of the age of eight and twenty years. This was written by me and 
it was delivered by my Lady Morgan in the presence of my Lady Wroth 
and ray self, John Machell. Russell, 42. 

Sn; Nathaniel Rich, 2 December 1635, acknowledged about 28 Octo- 
ber 1636, with a Codicil added 10 November 1636. proved 1 December 
IC36. I nominate and appoint the Right Hon. the Lord Mandevill sole 
executor. I would be buried at Standon. Essex, in the parish church 
there. I would have ray executor erect some monument for me, where- 
ever I be buried, the same not exceeding the sum of fifty pounds, or a hun- 



872 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

dred marks. I would only have my sisters and brothers in law and their 
children and all my servants to have mourning suits of black cloth. My 
manor of Stondon and all my lands in E,sex I give to my nephew Na- 
thaniel Riche, when he comes to the age of one and twenty years; in the 
mean time my executor to receive the rent and to allow him four score 
pounds per annum for his education for some time at the University of 
Cambridge and then at Lincoln's Inn, it being my desire that he should 
study and profess the Law. I give the profit of seven of my shares in the 
Barmudas, now called the Sonier Islands, to my sister Grimsdiche and her 
husband during their lives, if they will go and inhabit upon them, aud one 
hundred and fifty pounds in money for the transporting of themselves and 
such of their children as they shall think fit to carry with them. I give 
one other share to my nephew Robert Browne now residing in the said 
Somer Islands, he having one other share there already, upon the gift of 

my sister Wroth lately deceased. I give one other share there to 

Browne, one other of the sons of my sister Browne deceased, who hath 
been hitherto educated by my noble friend the Countess of Leicester, mother 
to Sir John Smith. The residue of my shares there, being five, I give for 
the maintenance of a free school in those Islands, which my desire is should 
first be erected out of the profits of the said five shares and then laid for- 
ever to the said school, the schoolmaster to be nominated and chosen by my 
executor and his noble lady and, after their decease, by such religious and 
discreet feoffees as they shall appoint; and my desire is that some of the 
Indian children to be brought either from Virginia or New England, or 
some other continent of America, such as my executor shall think fittest, 
may be brought over there to be instructed in the knowledge of true re- 
ligion. In case my said brother in law Mr. Grimsdieh and his wife will 
not, within one year after my decease, go thither in their own persons to 
live there then I will not that either of them have any benefit by this gift, 
unless by the hand of God they shall be hindered &c. &c. 

I give to Nathaniel Browne, now in New England with Mr. Hooker, the 
two hundred pounds which by my sister Morgan's will was bequeathed un- 
to him and fifty pounds more, as my own gift; which two hundred and fifty 
pounds I would have Mr. Hooker employ during the minority of the said 
Nathaniel Browne for and towards his education, paying himself for his 
charges. I give unto Samuel Browne, one other son of my said sister 
Browne, one hundred pounds in money, the same to be employed during 
his minority for his benefit as my executor shall think most tit. The Rec- 
tory of Neverne in Pembrokeshire in Wales to my executor iu trust to 
make sale thereof and dispose of the money for the performance of this 
will. I give to Thomas Grimsdieh, the eldest son of my brother Grimsdieh, 
who is now in the Isle of Providence, the forty pounds per anuum annuity 
which my Lord of Warwick is to pay during the life of the said Thomas. 
To Thomas Allaby my servant one hundred pounds. To Jonas Anger ten 
pounds per annum for life, and ten pounds in money. To William Jesopp, 
more than formerly in my life time I have given him (fifty pounds) I give 
all my wearing linen and apparel. Whereas there is in M r GonVs hand 
(that was sometime steward to my Lord of Warwick) a statute taken in his 
name, for a thousand pounds, debt due to my said Lord and myself, where- 
of one half belongs to me, I do hereby give unto that my dear and noble 
Lord the said five hundred pounds as a testimony of my humble affection to 
him and thankfulness for his love and favor towards me. To the Right 
Hon. my very noble lord the Earl of Holland one hundred pounds and an- 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



873 



other hundred pounds to his noble lady, part of the money which his Lord- 
ship oweth me. The diamond ring which I usually wear, it being my sis- 
ter Wrothe's legacy to me, I give to my brother Wroth. (Other gifts to 
friends). My Library, books and papers, I give to my said noble Lord the 
Lord Mandevill, the sole executor of this my last will and testament, pray- 
ing him that at least with part of them he would furnish a library to be set 
up in the free school at the Somer Islands, as formerly I have appointed. 
The late Lady Warwick's picture I give unto my lord Riche, her sou. To 
my worthy friend Mr. Wharton, miuisterat Felsted in Essex, thirty pounds 
as a testimony of my special love unto him and thankfulness for his care 
bestowed in the education of my nephew Nathaniel Riche. To my dear 
friend M r John Pym my best gelding and a ring of twenty pounds. To 
my very loving cousin Mrs. Martha Wilford twenty pounds. 

Pile, 123. 

[BROWNE OF SNELSTOX, DERBYSHIRE. 



Thomas Browne of Snelston=Margaret, daughter to 



-Chetham, of 



co. Derby. 



the family of Chetham near Manchester 
& related to Humphrey Chetham founder 
of the Cheatham Free Library & Blue 
Coat School at Manchester. 



Rudolphus Browne. 

A son Ralphe 
was buried 
April 18th, 1577. 



Nicholas Browne 

of Snelston buried 

Jan. 18, 1587. 

His wife died 

April 28, 1595. 



=Elianor dr & heiress to Ralph 
Shirley Esq. of Shirley, Der- 
byshire, of Staunton Harold 
& Braylesford. co. Leicester. 
Her first husband was Tho- 
mas Vernon, 2d son of Hum- 
phrey Vernon of Clifton and 
Harleston, Derbyshire, as by 
the marriage settlement made 
1545, May 5. The Shirleys of 
Shirley & of Staunton Harold 
were represented in 1011 by a 
Baronet, in 1077 by Baron 
Ferrars, & in 1711 by Earl 
Ferrars of Staunton Harold. 



Thomas Browne, 
d. without issue. 



Sir Wm. Browne, b. in 1558= 
at Snelston, served for seve- 
ral years in the Low Coun- 
tries and d. there in 1010, 
August : was Lieut. Gover- 
nor of Flushing. 



Mary Savage, 
b. in Germany, 
naturalized in 
1000. 



Gertrude Browne. 



William Browne, Ann Browne, d. young, 
d. young, but nat- naturalized by Act of 
unitized by act of Parliament, 1601. 

Parliament, 1004. 

bapt. Nov. 10, 1594. Barbara Browne, 
d. an infant, but 
naturalized 1004. 



Percy Browne= Rich, dau. Mary Browne, 

naturalized of Col. Nathaniel b. in Holland, 

1022; Kichot Standon, naturalized 

h. about 1002. Essex; d. before 1022. 
1035. 



Nathaniel Browne, sent 
over to N. L. under Un- 
charge of'the Rev. Thos. 
Hooker, about 10i:i-4; 
mar. in N.E. and had 10 
sons. 



Robert Browne, went to the 
Providence I.-land, West In- 
dies ; named after Robert 
Sydney, Earl of Leicester; 
was ordained a minister and 
appointed to a church in 
Somers Islands in 1055, and 
d. there in 1060. 



Samuel ...... Browne, educated 

Browne. by the Countess of Leices- 
ter, widow of Robert Syd- 
ney, 1st Earl of Leicester 
of the Sydney family; his 
name supposed to be' Win. 
asa Wm. Browne was out 
in the Providence Islands 



When I was preparing my memoir of Rev. Nathaniel Waul, the compiler of 
the Massachusetts Body of Liberties and author of the Simple Cobler, I ascer- 
tained that the patron of the living of Stondon Mossey, Essex, when held by 
Mr. Ward, was Sir Nathaniel Rich. Col. Joseph L Chester, who had assisted 
me much in my researches, kindly sent me an abstract of the will of Sir 
Nathaniel, which I had printed in the Historical Magazim for April. 18G7, 
pp. 206-7. 



874 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

In 1882 t!ic hue G. T>. Scull. Esq., then residing at Oxford, England, prepared 
a book entitled "Sir William Browne, knight, 1556-1610; and Sir Nathaniel 
Rich, knight, L636," which he presented to the New-England Historic Gene- 
alogical Society. The book, which -.till remains in manuscript, is before me. 

Sir Nathaniel Rich was prominent on the patriot side, and was active in 
American colonial enterprises. A biographical notice of him -will be found in 
Brown's "Genesis of the United States," vol. 2, pp. 979-80; but Mr. Scull's 
memoir is longer and gives more details. 

The Nathaniel Browne mentioned in Sir Nathaniel Rich's will as "now in 
New Eugland with Mr. Hooker," is also named in the preceding will of his aunt 
Lady Morgan. Miss Mary K. Talcott states that he married Dec. 23, 1647, 
Eleanor, daughter of Richard Watts. In 1G34 he removed from Hartford to 
Middletown, Ct.. where he died in 1658. He had sons — Thomas died young, 
Nathaniel of Middletown, John of Middletown, and Benoni. The pedigree at 
the head of this note is from Mr. Scull's book. 

What is known of later descendants of Nathaniel Browne of Hartford, Ct. ? — 
Editor.] 

William Sidey of St. Peter Cheapside, Loudon, gen 4 , 27 June 1711, 
proved 11 August 1713. To my wife Dorothy Sidey the lease of my little 
house in Day's Court, wherein I now dwell, and the remainder of the years 
to come therein, being about twenty years. If she die before the expira- 
tion of said term I give the same to my loving sister Susanna Marriott. 
My wearing apparel I give unto my two nephews Side Marriott and Ed- 
ward Marriott both of New England in America, equallv to be divided be- 
tween them. My freehold estate or farm called Chiggborrows, in the Co. 
of Essex, in the parishes of Little Totham and Much Totham, containing, 
by estimation, one hundred and thirty acres or thereabouts, now in the 
occupation of Sarah Browne, widow, I give to my sister Susanna Marriott 
for life, then to my nephew Sidey Marriott ami his heirs forever, subject to 
the payment of one hundred pounds to my said nephew Edward (Marriott). 
My body to be buried near the corpse of my dear mother and niece in tiie 
parish churchyard of St. Mary Matfellon ah Whitechapel, Middlesex. And 
I do make my loving wife my sole executrix, to whom I have been married 
above twenty years last August by one Mr. Saltmarsh, formerly belonging 
to the Portuguese Embassador and now Chaplain to his Grace the present 
Duke of Norfolk, and do desire that no contention may arise from my sis- 
ter about my marriage, but she behave herself lovingly to my wife, and my 
wife to do the same to her. Leeds, 195. 

Christopher Newport of London, mariner and one of the six Masters 
of His Majesty's Navy Royal, 10 November 1616, proved 27 October 1618. 
Being now by God's grace and assistance to go with the next wind and 
weather Captain of the good ship called the Hope of London for to sail in- 
to the East Indies, a long and dangerous voyage &c. I give and bequeath 
unto my loving wife Elizabeth my now dwelling house situate ami being 
upon Tower Hill, London, in the parish of All Hallows Barking together 
with my garden adjoining thereunto, only aud for and during her natural 
lite. After her decease I give and bequeath my fee simple of my said 
house and lease of my said garden &c. unto my two sons jointly together, 
by name Christopher and John Newport. If they die without' issue then 
to my daughter Elizabeth &c. To my said daughter Elizabeth lour hun- 
dred pounds (now employed in the East India Company), to be <dven her 
at her day of marriage or full age of twenty one years! To my daughter 
Jane five pounds in three months, and no more, in regard of many her 
great disobediences towards me and other misdemeanors, to my 'neat heart's 
gn< 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. > s i 5 

Item I give and bequeath unto my said two sons Christopher and John 
and to my said daughter Elizabeth, equally between them all and singular, 
my stock and adventure in general which I have in the Virginia Company 
&c. I make and ordain of this my last will and testament my loving wife 
Elizabeth and the Right Worshipful Sir Thomas Smith, knight, Governor 
of the East India Company, my full and whole executors. And T give to 
the said Sir Thomas Smith one diamond ring of the value of ten pounds of 
lawful English money. And as overseers I make and ordain my very good 
friends Mr. Matthias Springham and Mr. John Goodfellow, to each of 
whom I give a ring of forty shillings apiece. In Bantam Road this tenth 
of September 1617. It appears that his son Christopher was then Master's 
Mate in the same ship. Meade, 92. 

Christofer Newport, Master's Mate of the Hope, 27 April 1618, 
proved 22 September 1618. A remembrance to the Hon. knight Sir 
Thomas Smith and to sundry friends (named). Among the gifts were 
Howes Chronicle, books of voyages, a jar of green ginger, a Cheshire 
cheese &c. To my loving mother Mrs. Elizabeth Newport one China box 
one Japan dish, three small China painted dishes &c. To my brother John 
Newporte a sword enlaid with silver, a pair of hangers and a small hoop 
ring of gold &c. To my sister Elizabeth Newport two pieces of branched 
damask, one red and one red and "yallowe" a China box, two gold rings 
one with a spark of a diamond and one with a garnet &c. To my aunt 
Amye Glunmeld one gold ring with garnet unset. To my kinswoman 
Elizabeth Gluufield one China box. To Elizabeth Chapell, Mr. Melson's 
daughter, one China box. To Dr. Meddowes preacher of God's word at 
Fanchurch six China dishes painted. To my sister Jane Newport ten 
pounds, conditionally that she have reformed her former course of life. 
But if she continue in her wonted courses then my will is that she have 
nothing. To my Aunt Johane Ravens ten pounds, in consideration of 
twenty four ryalls of eight remaining in my hands, which moneys I received of 
Henry Ravens deceased for her use, with an old silver cup. To Christo- 
fer Ravens (in consideration of a gift from his brother Henry Ravens). 
My linen, books and instruments belonging to the sea to be sold at the 
mast and the same registered in the purser's book. I give all to my brother 
John Newport and my sister Elizabeth Newport and I make them my 
executors. Aboard the Hope in the Road of Saldainin 27 April 1618. 

Proved by John Newport, power reserved for Elizabeth Newport when 
she should come to seek it. Meade, 85. 

[Next preceding the above will is the registered copy of the will of his 
cousin Henry Ravens to whom he refers. He also made his will on board of 
the Hope, as" Master. H. F. W.] 

[Many references to Capt. Christopher Newport in "The Genesis of the 
United "States " will be pointed out by the Index. There is a sketch of him on 
pp. 956-958, of Sir Thomas Smith pp. 1012-1018, and of Mr. Matthias Spring- 
ham p. 1U22. Glunffield, I take to be Glanffield, i.e. Glanville. Sir Francis and 
Richard Glanville were members of the Va. Co. of London.— See p. 898. Mr. 
Melsou may be the Mr. Melshawe mentioned in the Va. Records, p. 178. Dr. 
James Meadows. Medust, etc.. p. 946, 982. In September, 1609, Henry Ravens, 
master's mate, and Thomas Wnittingham, cape merchant of " The Sea Venture," 
were sent after "The Tempest" from " the still-vex'd Bermoothes" for Vir- 
ginia, and were never heard of again (p. 1053) in our records. He was probably 
of the same family as Henry Ravens, master of '< The Hope"; or as our earliest 
records are so incomplete, he may have survived the Bermudas voyage — and the 
master's mate of 1609 may have been the master of 1017. 



876 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Mr. John Newport, the only son and heir of Capt. Christopher Newport, at- 
tended the meetings of the Va. Co. of London, from time to time, during 
1619-23, probably before and after. 

On November 17, 101'J, he desired the Virginia Court to lay out some of his 
land in Va. for him, and they wrote to Gov. Yeardley to do so. In the following 
February his mother sent six men to Virginia, at her charge, on board " The Jona- 
^ian." July 10, 1621, " upon the humble petition of Mrs. Newport, widow, the 
Va. Court ordered the Governor and Council in Va. to set out thirty-two shares 
of land in Va. heretofore bestowed upon Captain Christopher Newport, her late 
husband, deceased, in reward of his service, with an addition of three whole 
shares for the six men sent in " The Jonathan," in any place not already disposed 
of, which is commended to the care of Capt. Hamor, to see it done according 
to Mrs. Newport's desire." 

On May 14, 1023, the Virginia Court confirmed the "32 shares to Mr. John 
Newport, descended unto him by the death of his father, Captain Christopher 
Newport, which confirmation having been read and approved in the preparative 
court, as also in the morning by the committee, was now put to the question and 
ordered to be sealed." 

The exact location of these lands in Virginia is, I believe, still doubtful. As 
to New Port Newse, as yet I have seen no reason for changing the opinions ex- 
pressed in The Genesis, pp. 95G, 958.— Alexander Brown, of Norwood, Va.} 

Lawrence Hampton of London, taylor, 9 November 1627, proved 
12 February 1627. To the poor of Tickenham (Twickenham) Middlesex 
twenty shillings. To my sister Philadelphia Hampton twenty pounds. 
Item, I give and bequeath unto my brother William Hampton ten pounds 
of lawful money of England to be paid unto him within twelve months 
after his return from Virginia in the parts beyond the seas. And if my 
said brother shall happen to die or depart this life before his return from 
Virginia in this realm of England then I give and bequeath the said ten 
pounds unto my sister Philadelphia if she be then living. To Thomas 
Garret my father in law twenty shillings. To and among the servants of 
my brother Henry Rand, citizen and joiner of London, forty shillings to be 
divided amongst them &c. All these legacies to be paid out my lands in 
Twickenham. To my said brother Henry Rande and my sister Anne his 
wife all my lands, tenements &c, freehold and copyhold, in Twickenham, 
Middlesex. The said Henry to be executor. One of the witnesses was 
Keneline Winslowe. Archd. of London, B. 7, L. 17. 

[The present "Hampton" River was named by Lord I)e La Warr in 1610 
" Southampton" River for Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton, the early 
friend of Shakespeare. On May 17, 1G20, the name of Smytlie's Hundred (ex- 
tending on the north side of James River from " Tanks Wayouoke down to the 
mouth of the Chicahominc River") was changed to Southampton Hundred. The 
" Chicahominc " River was then called " Southampton" River, and the name of 
the original river of that name was soon after contracted into "Hampton" 
Uivcr. William Hampton settled in that region about that time, and that fact 
may have had something to do with the change in the name of the river. There 
is some confusion about the first settler of the name. Hotteu apparently gives 
the names of tioo Win. Hampton's, each coming on the Bona Nova, and each 
having a wife Joane (see pp. 253, 2G1) ; one. " age 40. arrived in the Bona Nova 
in L020"; the other, " age 34, in the Boua Nova 1621." The Bona Nova arrived 
in Virginia, on her 2d voyage, in the fall of 1620; on her 3d voyage, not Long 
before March 25, 1622. The references are possibly to the same man and his 
wife. They were living in "Elizabeth Cittie beyond Hampton River— Beinge 
the Conipaiiycs land," — in 1625, and still there in L635. 

In 1569, the manor-house at Ticicki tiltam was leased to Catherine and Barnard 
Hampton (which Barnard had been clerk of the Council to Edward VI., Queen 
Mary, and Queen Elizabeth). William Hampton of Virginia may have been to 
the manor born. 

The Hampton family of South Carolina (of whom Gen. Wade Hampton) was 
originally from Virginia. — Alexandkk Brown.] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 877 

Axne Ball of London, widow, 13 March 1G53, proved 9 October 
1054. My body to be buried in the parish church of St. Dunstau's iu the 
East, in Loudon, near to the body of my late husband. The poor of said 
parish, the poor of Stanraore and the poor of Weald in the parish of Har- 
row on the Hill. My cousin Cicely Gilbert if living at the time of my 
decease. My daughter Anne Young. Richard Cooke son of my late 
deceased daughter "Mary Cooke. My grandchild Thomas Ball (a minor). 
Mv daughter in law Susan Ball. My daughter Barbara Reeve, to whom I 
have " bin " kind and helpful at her second marriage. My daughter Jane 
Pindar. Those messuages, lands, tenements and hereditaments which I 
have near Battle Bridge in the parish of St. Olave Southwark in the 
Co. of Surrey, the inheritance whereof I purchased of Lady Welde and 
her son. My son Richard Ball. My daughter Margaret Allott. My 
daughter Elizabeth Gough. Their children. My sons iu law William 
Robinson, John Cooke, William Pindar, James Gough and Thomas Reeve. 
My brother Master Thomas Burnell, and his wife. My sou John Ball. 
My daughter Anne Young to be executrix. Alchin, 46. 

Hester Burnell of the Spittle. Midd. widow, 14 March 1663, with 
codicil dated 17 May 16G4, proved 15 October 1664. To be buried in the 
parish church of St. Allhallowes (sic) Barking, near my late dear husband. 
Cousins John Burnell Esq., Thomas Burnell and his wife and Henry 
Burnell and his wife. Brother Henry Wollaston Esq. and his wife. Brother 
Thomas Wollaston. Cousin Sarah Edlin widow. Brother Robert Smith 
and bis wife. Cousin Dr. Edmund Trench and his wife. Cousin Dr. 
Roger Drake and his wife. Cousin Dr. Samuel Winter and his wife. 
Cousin John Crowther and his wife. Cousin Stephen White and Hester 
his wife. Cousin Edmund Trench, son of the said Dr. Trench. Cousin 
Thomas Harlow and Anne his wife. Mr. Samuel Slater the elder and 
Mr. Richard Kentish. Cousin Elizabeth Goffe. Cousin Katherine Burcher. 
Cousin Bowtell. Cousin Lucy Manistey wife of Clement Manistey. If it 
shall please God that I die at Dr. Samuel Annesley's house then I give 
unto the said Dr. Annesley and his wife four pounds apiece. The poor of 
Stanmore Magna, Midd. Cousin Ann Woodrotfe wife of Thomas Woodroffe. 
Cousiu Elizabeth daughter of my cousin Frances Hassell. Cousin John the 
son of my said cousiu Hassell (to be placed out an apprentice). Cousiu 
Edward Hassell, brother to the said Elizabeth and John. Cousin Hassell's 
other two daughters not before named. Mary Burnell daughter of Henry 
Burnell. Cousin William Johnson. Henry Wollaston, grandson to my 
brother Henry Wollaston Esq. Cousin Henry Harrington, graudson to 
Henry Wollaston Esq. Ursula Berrisford, grand daughter to Henry Wol- 
laston Esq. My chamber at Hunterscombe. Thomas Burnell son of 
John Burnell Esq. and the daughter of John Burnell Esq. To my Cousin 
Farmer I give the gilt owl which her mother gave me, to use for and during 
the term of her natural life; and after her decease I give the same to her 
nephew Thomas Marlow. Others named. Bruce, 109. 

[The two foregoing wills still further extend our knowledge of the English 
connections of John Morley of Charlestown, whose mother Katherine was the 
only sister of Mrs. Anne Ball and sister, also of Thomas the husband of Hester 
Burnell. Mrs. Ball's husband was Richard, son of John Ball of Wellingborow 
(Northampton), as it is shown in the pedigree of Younge (Vis. of London 
1G33-4). Her daughter Anue was married to James Youg of London, merchant. 
In my extracts from London Marriage Licenses (Hist. Coll. of Essex Institute 
1S'.)2) Avill be found, on page •'•'.». the marriage Allegation of Thomas Gate Esq. 
and Anne Morlev. the sister of our John Morley. HENKY F. WATERS.] 



878 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

John* Hacker of Limeliouse, Stepney Middlesex, planter, 7 January 
1653, proved 8 June 1654. 1 give unto William Rookeing of Virginia, 
planter, one heifer of three years old, with calf, or at least with a calf by her 
side, and one fowling piece and shot bag which was his father's, to be deliv- 
ered unto him in Virginia, within six months after my disease, at my plan- 
tation. To my man James, now resident in Virginia, a weaning calf. To 
my loving wife Elizabeth Hacker, during her natural life, the lease of a 
small cottage and garden &c. in Freethorne. in the Co. of Gloucester, ami 
after her decease then to come and be. during the remainder of the lease, 
unto my son John Hacker. To my wife Elizabeth and my son John all 
my whole estate and plantation in Virginia, witli my household stuff, goods, 
corn, tobacco and stock of all sorts of cattle whatsoever and servants what- 
soever as are or shall be bound unto me during the terms of their apprentice- 
ships. If my said wife marry with another man then her part to come and 
return unto my son John and his heirs &c, remainder to my kinsman Ralph 
Hacker, son of my brother Thomas Hacker of Penzance, in the Co. of 
Cornwall, glover, and his heirs &c, lastly to my right heirs. My said wife, 
during my son's nonage, shall receive his part of the profits yearly of my 
plantation for and towards his education and bringing up. To my wife all 
my personal estate in England. My wife and son to be executors and lov- 
ing friends Master John Westrop and Captain Abraham Reade to be over- 
seers. 

Proved by Elizabeth Hacker the relict &c, power reserved for John 
Hacker &c. Alchin, 23. 

[John Hacker came to Virginia in the Hopwell, at the age of 17, in K524. In 
1C>35 he had a patent granted him of 150 acres on the west side of upper Clrip- 
poaks Creek; fifty of this was due him for his personal adventure and one 
hundred for his two servants Abraham Hill and Charles Hould. William Rooke- 
ing came over in the Bona Nova in 1G1D, and was aged 26 in 1G24. In 1636 Win. 
Rookins had 150 acres in the county of James City, the said land being called 
" the flying point." There was also due him 50 acres for his wife Jane Baxter, 
and 100 for Robert Risby and John Allen. — W. K. Watkixs.] 

Petek Priaulx of Melkesham, Wilts, clerk, 18 May 1G77, proved 
26 August 1686. Five pounds to the use of the parish church of Melkes- 
ham. The same to the poor of Melkesham and also of Rnsper, Sussex. 
To my dear kinsman Mr. John Priaulx of Salisbury Wilts, linen draper, 
my freehold messuage &c. in Horsham. Sussex, called Jenhams and anothei 
called Birds. Bequests to John and Henry Stone sons of my dear brother 
Mr. John Stone of Rusper. My dear kinswoman Bridget Greenfield now 
dwelling with me. Peter Priaulx younger son of Doctor John Priaulx 
late Canon Residentiary of the Close of New Sarum deceased. 'William 
Priaulx younger sou of Mi'. Paul Priaulx of the city of London merchant. 
Elizabeth Stone the daughter of my brother Mr. John Stone. My sister 
in law Elizabeth Gurney the now wife of Mr. John Gurney of Rusper in 
Sussex. Reference to decease of honored lather M 1 '. William Priaulx of 
Rusper, Sussex, Clerk. Brother Mr. John Stone senior to be executor. 

Mr. John Stone, the executor named in the will, having died in the life 
time of the testator, commission issued to Elizabeth Gurney (wife of John 
Gurney) sister on the mother's side and next akin to Peter Priaulx de- 
feased &c. Lloyd. 100. 

[See the Pryaulx and Mcrcor wills, witli notes en the Bachilcr family in 
Hecistku, vol. 17. pp. 510— li3 ante, pp. 7v; - . — Editor. ] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. £7 ( J 

William Tatton of St. Mary Aldermary London, July l<ii;.~>. proved 
26 February L665. Not knowing (in this t Iil* Lord's visitation by Pesti- 
lence in this City) how uncertain my hour may he &c. To be buried in 
the chancel of the parish church afOresaiil in the same grave where my 
most loving wife was buried, at the upper end of the S. i>le at the very 
corner of the pews on the left hand (before you step up where the ground 
is raised) under a broken -tone. Mr. Richard Bagnall ami my -d>ter in 
law Anne Maehen to he overseers and assistants to my son William Tatton 
whom I do constitute and appoint to he my sole executor (afterwards 
referred to as only son). Conditional gifts to the poor of St. Martin's in the 
Fields and of the parish or borough of Newcastle under Lyne in the Co. 
of Stafford (bread to he distributed on the Seavehth day of February, if it 
be Sunday, or else on the Sabath day next following the Seaventh of Febru- 
ary yearly). My mother in law Elleu Maehen of Newcastle under Lyne, 
widow, provided she be married to no man beside her husband Richard 
Maehen deceased. The. two children of ray sister Illage (now Weston). 
The three children of ray brother George Tatton. The two children of 
mv sister Susan Milles. The two children of my brother and sister in law 
John and Alice Harrison of Newcastle under Line. John Maehen now in 
Virginia. I desire Mr. Hugh Piers and Mr. James Whitchurch to assist 
my executor about ray shop. I also desire that my executor and overseers 
will take care of Sam : Ay 1 worth and provide him a good place and procure 
what favor for him they can. 

Commission issued 29 July 1682 to Anne Cumberlege, wife of John 
Cumberle^e M. D., relict and administratrix of the goods of William Tat- 
ton the younger deceased, while he lives the son, executor and residuary 
legatee under the will of the said deceased, to administer the goods &c. by 
the said executor left unadministered &c. Mico, .'i4. 

[John Machem, age 18 in 1G35, came over in the Paul of London. — W. K. W.] 

Mary Bendish senior of London, spinster, 17 April 1 G93, proved 
9 June 1693. To my niece Mary Bendish of London junior ten pounds 
and to my niece Sarah Tookie of London senior, being the daughter of 
Job Tookie, ten pounds. To Thomas Bendish of London, son of Edmond 
Bendish of Norfolk, five shillings to buy him a ring. To my niece Rachel 
Bendish all the remainder of my goods, money and estate, both real and 
personal, after the payment of the above said three legacies, and I do make, 
constitute and appoint her to be sole executrix &c. Coker, 92. 

See Tookie wills and notes in the Register, vol. 44, pp. 96-8 (ante, pp. 
431-3; ; vol. 4G, p. 45G (ante, p. 048). — Editor.] 

John Aubott of St. Saviours Southwark, Surrey, gen'. 2 February 
1692, proved 13 July 1G93. My sister in law Sarah Reynolds of Stam- 
ford, Lincoln, widow. My niece Ruth Brinknoll. The widow of ray late 
cousin John Abbott. William Surflet and Thomas Webb. To the poor of 
Mr. Matthew Barker's church. 

Item, I do give and bequeath unto ray loving son Josiah Abbott (who, if 
living, is, I suppose, at Boston in New England) the sum of fifty pounds of 
lawful money of England to be paid to him within the space of one year 
next after my decease (if he shall be then living): if he be dead and leave 
any child or children, by him begotten or to be begotten, then I bequeath 
and appoint the same fifty pounds to his child or children. My son Samuel 
Abbott (at twenty three years of age). My cousin James Foe. My loving 



880 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

daughter Mary Eyton. Her husband, my sou in law, Sampson Eyton, 
hosier. Coker, 104. 

[Josiah Abbott married about 1686 Hannah, b. 22 July, 1662, the daughter of 
John and Mary (Bullard) Farrington of Dedham, and had John, b. in*Boston 
22 Aug. 1687, and Hannah, b. 1690. 

31 Dec. 1690. Josiah Abbott cordwainer of Boston, and Abraham Browne 
cordwainer of Boston, agree that the said Browne should take the nine months 
old daughter of said Abbott and feed, clothe and educate the said daughter Han- 
nah as his own child till she reach the age of eighteen or marries. In consider- 
ation of this Abbott grants him eight acres of land known as Purgatory in Ded- 
ham, and sixteen acres of land in Natick called Wapensett near Dedham, this 
land being formerly the estate of John Farrington deceased of Dedham, which 
Abbott received by marriage with Hannah daughter of John Farrington, it hav- 
ing been settled on her by order of the Suffolk County Court.— Suffolk Deeds, 
L. 15, 178. 

Later, 23 Nov. 1711, John Abbott of Newport, R. I., son and heir of Josiah 
and Hannah Abbott, for £20 paid by John Everett, junior, of Dedham, grants 
five acres in Naponsett Field butting in Dorchester, also eight acres in Purga- 
tory, his mother's, formerly a Farrington.— Suffolk Deeds, L. 26, 70— W. K. W.] 

Mary Morris of the Liberty of the Tower of London, widow, 15 
February 1653, proved 27 February 1653. To Master Thomas Baylye 
and Mistress Katherine Bayley and Master Nicholas Humphrey, to each of 
them twenty shillings. To my son Thomas Newman a mourning cloak, 
hat and other things fitting for mourning. To Mistress Jane Humphry 
my silver tankard and to Mistress Susan Perrye my ring with a white stone 
and to Jane Bannister my ring with a small diamond and a ruby. To 
Thomas Newman all those forty and eight acres of land in the Lew ward 
and ten acres of land in Scotland and one hundred and twenty foot of land 
next the State house, at the Bridge, all lying and being in the island of 
Barbados, and all moneys, merchandizes, debts, bonds and specialties what- 
soever that are any ways due, owing or belong unto me or my late husband 
Thomas Morrice deceased by or from any person or persons &c. in the 
island of Barbados. In case my son Thomas Newman shall not be living 
at the time of my death then I give and bequeath all such lands &c. unto 
my son in law George Newman &c. And I give the money due for the 
service of my late husband from Capt. Reade (two and twenty months 
service) unto my son Thomas &c. To my sister Elizabeth Katherine all 
my ready money, share of prize money &c. &c. And I make and ordain 
my brother John Parris of the Barbados and my said sister Elizabeth 
Katherine jointly and severally executors &c. 

Wit: Thomas Parris, Peter Pery. Alchin, 21. 

Bridget Lucas, wife of Edward Lucas, citizen and plaisterer of Lon- 
don, 16 October 1657, proved 19 November 1657. To my kinswoman 
Mary Bishopp now resident in Virginia (certain articles of clothing). John 
Bishopp her brother. My cousin Elizabeth Perry. My brother and sister 
Whitwick. My daughter Sarah Hide. My daughter Martha Leeke. My 
three sons Luke, Silvanus and Timothy Hide. To my two daughters 
Martha Leeke and Sarah Hide such household stuff &c. which were mine 
before my intermarriage with my husband Edward Lucas. The lease of 
my house in Rood Lane I have to my brother (?) Silvanus Hide. To my 
son Timothy Hide the lease of the house called the Key in Rood Lane. 
Other estates to other children. My son John Hide and Elizabeth his 
wife. My kinswoman Lydia Messenger. My other son Paul Hide. My 
brother Booker's son. My cousins Henry Sharpe and Elianor Harlowe. 
My son Ralph Leeke. My son William Edwards and his wife. 

Ruthen, 456. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 881 

John Hall, citizen and draper of London, 23 August 1644, proved 
28 November 1644. My body to be buried in the parish church of Nicho- 
las Aeon in London, where my father lieth buried. My wife, my son 
Martin Hall, my daughter Sara and my son in law and daughter Blackwell. 
To my wife Sara my plate, Jewells aud her wearing rings of gold (over 
and above the other parts of my estate herein given unto her). All ray 
goods &c. (except the shares of the estates of my late father in law Sir Martin 
Lumley decease:! and of my aunt Alice Wood row deceased) shall be divided 
into three equal parts according to the Custom of London, one-third whereof 
I give to my said wife and the two other thirds thereof shall be divided 
into seven equal shares, one of which I give to my son Martin Hall, one 
other to my son Humfry Hall, one other to my son James Hall, one other 
to my daughter Alice, one other to my daughter Elizabeth, one other to my 
daughter Mary aud the other share I give to my wife Sara, my son Martin 
Hall and my son in law Gervas Blackwell upon trust to dispose the same 
unto my daughter Sara the wife of Thomas Berry, into her own hands or 
for her good, by such proportions and in such manner only as they, the said 
trustees, shall think fit, her husband to have no part thereof nor intermed- 
dle therewith. Provision made for her children. To my brother Humfry 
Hall forty shillings. The same to my sister Gorsuch, my sister Anne Bate 
aud to my sister Gartred Battson if her husband pay the debt of one hun- 
dred and fifty pounds and upwards which he oweth me. To my sister Sara 
Scrouther thirty shillings to buy her a ring if she please, so that her hus- 
band first pay to my executor all such debts as he truly oweth me. Sundry 
poor. The parish of St. Hellens where I late dwelt. I have recovered 
or am near upon recovery in the High Court of Chancery, of and from 
my brother in law Sir Martin Lumley, a share of the personal estate of my 
late father in law Sir Martin Lumley deceased, which he promised me upou 
mv marriage with his daughter, my wife, and was due by custom, and a 
share of the personal estate of my aunt Alice Woodrow deceased. Out of 
the former shall be paid two hundred pounds to the Drapers Company, to 
be lent out to four young men free of the Company &c. ; the rest to be 
divided into two equal parts, one of which I give to my wife the other (to 
be divided as before). Sou James at one and twenty. My two messuages 
in Lumbard Street, the Black Swan and the Golden Flying Horse, to be 
entailed on my (children in order) Martin, Humfry, James and my four 
daughters. Sara, Alice, Elizabeth and Mary. Lor the full advance of my 
son James &c. I give him my messuage, now made into two tenements, in 
Lambe Alley, St. Botolph without Bishopsgate, London, my wife to be his 
guardian &c. My son Martin to be executor and my brothers in law Sir 
Martin Lumley, knight, and Sir George Garrett, knight, to be overseers. 

Proved as above by Martin Hall. Commission issued 10 April 1662 to 
James Hall, son of John Hall late of St. Dunstan's in the West deceased 
&c, to administer the goods &c. left uuadministered by Martin Hall, sou 
and executor, now also deceased. Rivers, 6. 

[Other Hall wills will be found in the Register, vol. 47, pp. 138-40 (ante, pp. 
683-5) ; 246-49 (ante, pp. C88-91) and 500-9 (ante, pp. 779-82).— Editor.] 

Richard Berrisford of London, merchant, 13 June 1643, proved 22 
November 1644. Mentions wife Bennett Berrisford aud three sons, Rob- 
ert, Rowland and Samuel. My wife's brother John Greene Esq. Sergeant 
at Law. To son Rowland Berrisford houses and lands in Hertford town, 
Herts., called the King's Head. Houses in Cheapside at Foster Lane. 



882 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Copyhold and customary lands holden of the manor of Little Munden, 
Herts. Freehold land in Stondon, Herts. Brother John Berrisford. Sis- 
ter Mary Kenton wife of Richard Kenton. Brother Michael Berrisford 
and his wife. Robert and Thomas Berrisford, sons of brother George de- 
ceased. He does not name any of the family of Hall. Rivers, 9. 

John Hall, son of Thomas Hall late of London, merchant, make? his 
will at Adithe, twenty miles from Aleppo, 5 March 1644, proved 8 May 
164G. One third to my ever honored mother Mrs. Bennett Beresford, one 
third to my brother M r Humphrey Hail and the other third to my brother 
M r Daniel Hall. My uncle M r John Beresford. 

Commission issued, as above, to Humfrey Hall the brother. 

Twisse, 53. 

Abraham Wraxhall of White Friars, London, gentleman, 12. January 
1655, proved 1 June 1657. Wife Sarah. Brother John Wraxhall of 
Bristol. Brother Christopher Wraxhall and cousin Elizabeth Wraxhall, 
his daughter. Cousin Mary Wraxhall, one of the daughters of brother 
John, and cousin Sarah Wraxhall, another. Cousin John Wraxhall of St. 
Clement Danes, Middlesex, goldsmith. Cousin Sarah Wraxhall that liveth 
with me. Cousin Christopher to be bound to a watchmaker. His sisters 
Mary and Frances Wraxhall. 

I giue unto my Sonne in Lawe James Flail my Silver Tobaccoe Box. My 
cousin Goshin's three children. My cousin Atkinson's three. My cousins 
Mary and Frances Wraxhall, grandchildren of my brother Christopher. 
To Elizabeth Hitchcock five pounds. Cousin Peter Wraxhall to be sole 
executor. Ruthen, 223. 

[The four preceding wills throw further light on the English connections of 
John Hall who married Rebecca Byley (See Reg. for 1893, pp. 137-140, ante pp. 
681-84:; 244-249, ante pp. 684-91). ' John Hall, whose will (1644) I now give, 
was his father. Richard Berrisford, whose will follows, married Benet, or 
Bennett, widow of his uncle Thomas Hall. A pedigree of the family of Beres- 
ford will be found in the first Vol. of the Visitation of London 1633-1634 (Harl. 
So. Pub.) vol. 15, pp. 66-67. John Hall, whose will comes next, was the second 
son of Thomas and Benet (Greene) Hall. And, lastly, Abraham Wraxhall mar- 
ried Sarah, daughter of Sir Martin Lumley, Knight, widow of John Hall of 
London and mother of our John Hall of New England. Hexry F. Waters.] 

Richard Arnold citizen and goldsmith of London, 8 November 1644, 
proved 28 November 1644. My body to be buried in the churchyard of 
St. Bartholomew the Great, London ; and if I happen to decease in the 
County of Kent I desire to be buried in the churchyard of the parish of 
Gillingham in the said County, at the West end of either of the said church- 
yards. That messuage or tenement at Gadshill in Gillingham, to me given 
and bequeathed by the will of my late uncle William Short deceased and 
now in the tenure of Richard Keyes and Thomas Lawson I give unto 
Richard Arnold of Killingworth, Warwick, the son of Richard Arnold one 
of my father's brothers deceased, and to Richard Arnold of Kelshall, Suf- 
folk, the son of William Arnold another of my father's brothers deceased, 
to be equally divided &c, they to pay unto every of their brothers and 
sisters (jointly to be aecompted betwixt them) which shall be then living 
(except Thomas Arnold who is now supposed to be in New England or 
some other part beyond the seas) twenty shillings within one year &c, and 
shall pay unto the said Thomas tweuty shillings in one year or at any time 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 883 

afterwards within a month upon lawful demand to be made by the said 
Thomas or his assigns. My pan of certain property called Millfield, at 
Millrleet Key, Gillingham, to William Short, the son of James Short, who 
was tin- son of William Short, my mother's brother. To Margaret Walton 
of Radford, Warwick, widow, my father's sister a ring of gold with a seal 
thereon engraved having the letters w. s. and R. A., with a death's head 
betwixt them. To William her son and Elizabeth, Mary, Susan and Ilanna 
her daughters twenty shillings apiece. To Benedict, Katharine and Anne, 
the children of Joaue Wright, my father's sister, twenty shillings apiece. 
To Alice Wood of Ipswich, Suffolk, daughter of Elizabeth, another of my 
father's sisters, twenty shillings. To every of the children of Alice, another 
of my father's sisters, who I suppose do now inhabit in or about the Isle of 
Thannett, Kent, twenty shillings. To Joane Edwardes of Hartlipp Kent, 
widow, my mother's sister, a ring of gold with a seal thereon engraven 
having the letters t. e. and W. s., with a death's head betwixt them. To 
my kinswomau Mary Lofty, daughter of the said Joaue Edwardes and 
wife of Thomas Lofty my executor, twenty shillings. To William and 
Thomas Berry, the sons of another of my mother's sisters, twenty shillings 
each. To Joane Wilson and Susan Gransden, the daughters of another of 
my mother's sisters, twenty shillings each. To my loving master John 
Anthony. Doctor in Physicke, a silver can of which I entreat his accept- 
tauce. To Samuel and John, the sons of my said master, unto each of 
them a silver wine-taster, and to Mary, Elizabeth and Rebecca, the daugh- 
ters of my said master, unto every of them an enamelled gold ring to wear 
iu my remembrance. To the poor of the parish of Gillingham, where I 
was born, five pounds. To the poor of St. Bartholomew the Great, where 
I now inhabit, twenty shillings. My loving kinsman Thomas Lofty of 
Frendstead, Kent, yeoman, to be sole executor. Rivers, 7. 

[Two articles ou the Arnold family were published in the Register for October 
1879, vol. 33, pp. 427-38. In Austin's Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island 
over six pages (pp. 240-6) are devoted to the Arnolds. At the date of the aliove 
will there was a Thomas Arnold residing at Watertown, Mass. See Register, 
vol. 33, p. 435. Henry T. Browne, Esq., of New York city, who communicated 
to the Register one of the articles above named, has sent me much genealogical 
matter about the Arnolds not before communicated, including a tabular pedigree 
in MS. by Gen. George S. Greene of Morrisfcown, N. J., and letters from 
Messrs. Edmund S. F. Arnold of New York, Gen. Olney Arnold of Pawtucket, 
R. I., and Dr. Henry E. Turner of Newport, R. I.— Editor.] 

Percivall Simpson, citizen and haberdasher of London, dwelling within 
the parish of St. Anne Blackfriars, 14 October 1616,- proved 10 February 
1610. To Ethan Holly well, my sister, a widow in Billiter Lane in Lon- 
don. I give and bequeath five pounds, and no more, as well for that I have 
formerly given her at her first marriage the sum of eight pounds as also 
she hath "byn" unthankful unto me. To Elizabeth Simpson, daughter 
unto one Christopher Simpson, shoemaker, lately of St. Katherine's de- 
ceased, whose widow married one John de Boys, a shoemaker also, five 
pounds. I have two brothers in law unknown to me, the one named James 
Simpson a taylor in York and the other Oswald Simpson, but where dwell- 
ing I know not; to either of them ten shillings in token of my good will 
unto them. To Mr. Edward Watkinson and his wife ten shillings. To 
Mr. Anthony Simpson, haberdasher in Ludgate Street, and his wife ten 
shillings. Also I give unto the said Anthony Simpson's eight children, 
three sons and five daughters, viz'. .Martin Simpson, Anthony Simpson, 



884 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Nicholas Simpson, Joyce Simpson, Isabell Simpson, Phillip Simpson, Susan 
Simpson and Elizabeth Simpson, to every one of them five shillings. To 
Mr. John Sarkey ten shillings, to Mr. William Wilde, Mr. Edward Bar- 
wicke and Mr. Thomas Somers five shillings apiece. To the poor of St. 
Anne, Blackfriars, ten shillings and to John Feild of Blackfriars, purse- 
maker, twenty shillings and my sword, and to Richard Wheeler my ser- 
vant I give one of my fiuger frames and my linsey frame, to be delivered 
him at the end of his apprenticeship, or at the dispose of my wife and 
executrix. To Mary Wulfieete, if dwelling in my house at my decease, 
ten shillings. And I do give to whomsoever shall preach at my burial ten 
shillings. And I do make and ordain for my executrix Barbara my most 
loving wife, to whom I give and bequeath all the rest of my goods, leases, 
household stuff and whatsoever is or shall be mine in this world. And I 
do appoint for overseers Roger Nicholson, crossbow-maker, Richard Drowt 
shoemaker, my neighbours, Mr. Dawson, alebrewer at the Bankside, and 
William Waple, brushmaker, my neighbour. 

B. 23 Com. of London (1616-1621), L. 9. 

Anthony Simpson the elder of Welford in the Co. of Northampton, 
gen*., and citizen and haberdasher of Loudon, 15 August, 1633, proved 23 
April 1635. To Ellianor my well beloved wife, during her natural life, the 
use and occupation of all such household stuff as I had and received in 
marriage with her, saving only a long table in the parlour. To son Martin 
Simpson, for life, a close called Dovefall close in Welford, adjoining the 
house now in the occupation of Francis Grodby W. and Agnes Tatum N. 
The reversion of said close, after decease of said Martin, I give to my son 
Anthony Simpson and his heirs &c. forever. To the said Anthony, my son, 
my lease of the messuage &c. within Ludgate called the Black Boy, wherein 
the said Anthony, my son, now dwelleth (and other property in Welford 
and in the parish of Husbands Bostworth, Leicestershire). To sou Nicholas 
(certain property in Elkington, Northamptonshire). Forty pounds, out of 
the farm where I now dwell in Welford, to be paid to my daughter Joyce 
Smith. To my daughter Elizabeth Morris one hundred pounds, to be paid 
within three months next after her husband Philip Morris shall have made, 
for her jointure, an estate of thirty pounds per annum (during her life) of 
and in his lauds at Wardenton near unto Banbury, according to his promise. 
To Anne Collis, my grandchild, forty pounds at fifteen. To her mother 
Susan Collis forty shillings. To my daughter Philipp forty shillings. To 
my daughter Moore forty shillings. To my grandchild Francis Waters four 
pounds yearly for his maintenance till he come to the age of fifteen years and 
ten pounds to be employed in the setting of him forth to be an apprentice. 
And after he is bound apprentice then the four pounds per annum to cease 
and be no longer paid. To every one of my son Anthony's four children 
forty shillings apiece at twelve years of age. To my daughter Stnithe's 
children that shall be twelve years of age forty shillings apiece. To my 
daughter Morris her children that shall be of the like age of twelve years 
forty shillings apiece. To Anthony Waters son of Andrew Waters de- 
ceased forty shillings at the age of fifteen. The poor of Welford. Mary 
Willis of the same town. John Stroud and his wife. My sons Martin 
and Anthony to be executors and my friends William Lute of Ravens- 
thorpe, clerk, and Mathew Sillesby of Northampton, scrivener, to -be 
overseers, giving to each of them in token of my love five pounds apiece. 

Wit. by Matthew Sillesbye, Scr. and Mathew Sillesbye jun. 

Sadler, 35. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 885 

Martin Simson, minister of God's Word, living in Hackney, Middlesex, 
21 February 1664, proved 17 August 1665. To my wife Elizabeth ten 
pounds within one mouth after my decease and twenty pounds within four 
months &c, and all my household stuff iu my house at Hackney except my 
clothes and books aud my lesser silver tankard. To my sister Waters 
five pounds. To her daughter Dorothy Ames three pounds and to the 
rest of my said sister Waters' children twenty shillings apiece. To my 
cousin Mr. William Terry, haberdasher of London, five pounds. To my 
cousin Mr. Thomas Gellibrand's wife twenty shillings. To Mrs Carnall, 
widow, of Childerdish in Essex three pounds and to my loving friend Mr. 
Tilsley, confectioner in Blackfriars London, five pounds. To my niece 
Mrs. Tomkins five pounds and to Mrs. Elsmore, my wife's sister, forty 
shillings. To my sister Kentish forty shillings and to her daughter forty 
shillings and to the poor in Welford, Northampton, forty shillings. The 
daughters of Mr. Fawler, minister. Katherine. Deane, sometimes my 
servant. To my nephew Mr. Francis Waters, twenty pounds. To my 
nephew M r . John Collis twenty shillings aud to his wife the like 
sum. To my nephew Martin Simson thirty pounds. To my niece 
Elizabeth Simson fifty pounds, to my cousin M r . Samuel Gellibrand four 
pounds and to his wife twenty shillings. To my cousin Mr. Isaac King 
five pounds. Five pounds apiece to M r . Willis late minister of Ingaistou, 
Mr. Ranew late of Essex, minister, Mr. Horrax, late minister in Essex, 
Mr. Turner late of Preston in Sussex, minister, Mr. John Clarke, some- 
time minister in Essex, Mr. Barham, late minister in London, Mr. Sache- 
verell, late of Eastwood, Essex, minister, Mr. Farneworth, late of Essex, 
minister, Mr. Raynor, late of Egham, minister, aud Mr. Strattell, late 
minister in London. To my executors my six houses at the end of Caster 
Lane, Blackfriars, in trust to pay certain annuities. Among the annuitants 
were a cousin Mrs. Mary Favour, widow (six pounds per annum), a sister 
Mrs. Philippa Chaileton (ten pounds), a sister in law Mrs. Taylor, widow 
(forty shillings) and Mrs Cawton, widow, late wife of Mr. Cawton, hereto- 
fore minister of Saint Bartholomew's near the Exchange, Loudon (forty 
shillings). Conditional provision for the relief of poor scholars in the 
University of Oxford. My Latin and Greek books I give to Samuel Col- 
Iyer, my wife's son in law. The lesser silver tankard to nephew Martin 
Simson. To my said nephew all sums of money due from John Rose of 
Southton in New England, planter, by virtue of certain coveuants and agree- 
ments (indented) bearing date 25 March 1661, made between me the said 
Martin Simpson, by the name of Martin Simson of London, clerk, on the 
one part, and the said John Rose, on the other part, touching or concerning 
the transportation of my niece Hester Simson to New England, providing for 
her there, and other things therein expressed. To my wife an annuity of 
ten pounds payable out of my lands &c. in Welford, Northampton, and in 
Husbands Bosworth in the Co. of Leicester. To my nephew Anthony 
Simson all my said messuage, lands &c. in Welford and in Husbands Bos- 
worth, charged with the said annuity, he to pay his sister Hester Simson 
forty shillings in six months after my decease. To my nephew Mr. Francis 
Waters the lease of my two houses in Holiday's yard in the parish of Martin's 
Ludgate, in trust to pay my sister Charleton, out of the rents &c, ten 
pounds per aunum, for her life, according to the will of my sister Smith 
deceased, to whom I was executor, and also four pounds per annum to my 
niece Elizabeth Simson, during her natural life, if the said lease so long 
continue. I do nominate and appoint my dear friends Mr. Henry Ashurst, 



b86 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

woollen draper, Mr. Blackmore, sometimes minister of St. Peter's Cornhill, 
London, and my kinsman Mr. Thomas Gellibrand of London, oilman, 
executors, and give to them ten pounds apiece. To my friend Mr. John 
Rolfe, scrivener, forty shillings, to Mr. George Fawler. minister, forty shil- 
lings, to my nephew William Rose five pounds and for my funeral expenses 
twenty pounds. Hyde, 85. 

[John Rose, first found at Southampton, L. I., in 1656, and from whom all of 
the name there are descended. (Hist. Southampton, p. 368.) — W. K. Watkins.] 

Phillippa Charleton of the Borough of Southwark, Surrey, widow, 
18 November 1674, proved 3 January 1677. Refers to deed (indented), 
bearing date 21 May 1663, by which Anthony Simson late of Welford, 
Northampton, gen', deceased, stood obliged for the payment of one 
annuity or rent charge of fourteen pounds per annum during my natural 
life and of one hundred pounds, within six months after my decease, 
to such person or persons as I shall nominate and appoint by my last 
will. The said Anthony Simson is since deceased and by his will in 
writing did nominate his brother, my nephew, Martin Simson executor 
thereof. Bequests to niece Elizabeth Simson, to sister Susanna Collis 
and her daughter Mary Tomkins, to sister Elizabeth Kentish and her 
daughter and all her grandchildren, to cousin John Collis, to cousin 
Abigail Herrick, to cousin Frances Waters and to Grace Simson, wife 
of the said Martin Simson. To dear friends Mrs Anne Upton, Mrs 
Rebecca Goss, Jane Bruerton and Elisha Coles. To loving friends Mrs 
West and Katherine Waters, widow. Others. All that messuage &c. 
known by the name or sign of the Three Tobacco Pipes, in the parish of 
St. Olaves Southwark, which I hold by lease for a certain term of years 
not yet expired, I give &c. to the said Martin Simson, my executor. Ten 
pounds to be expended upon my funeral. The said Martin to pay to his 
sister Elizabeth Simson an annuity of four pounds, during her life. 

Reeve, 3. 

Martin Simpson, citizen and haberdasher of London, in the parish of 
St. Pancras, Soper Lane, — May 1693, proved 30 June 1693. An estate 
at Welford, Northamptonshire, called the Golden Hind, and some part of it 
over the brook of that town, in Leicestershire. Four pounds a year to be 
paid to my loving sister Elizabeth .Simpson, it being an annuity left by her 
aunt Philippa Charlton. Other bequests to her and to sister Abigail 
Merrick, and her daughter, to cousin Walters and to cousin John Collis. 
To loving wife the profits of two tenements in Prince Street, Lothbury, 
which came by her. Said wife Susanna to bring up the children in a decent 
and orderly habit and put my son Samuel out to some calling that may suit 
him, so that he may get his living, and my daughter in like manner. 
Another reference to wife as Susanna Peningtou. 

In the deposition of witnesses the testator is spoken of as late of St. 
Mary le Bow. Coker, 100. 

Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston of Ketton Suffolk, knight, 10 Septem- 
ber 1651, signed 18 -January 1652, proved 28 September 1653. "Finding 
through age my strength decaying." My desire is that my body, being the 
Temple of the Holy Ghost, may be decently buried, being wrapped in lead, 
with my father's if it may be. To my dearly beloved wife all her apparell, 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 887 

plate and Jewells called hers and that hundred pounds given her by her 
father's will, in the hands of Sir Thomas Soames, knight, and that ten 
pound a year given by her mother's will; also the half of my moveables 
&c. and one hundred pounds a year (over and above her jointure) out of 
my manor of Great Coales in Lincolnshire &c. My uncle Giles. My 
brother Arthur. My eldest son Sir Thomas Baruardiston, knight. The 
ancient plate left me by my grandfather. My daughter Ann the Lady 
Rolt. The sum given to her by her grandfather Sir Stephen Soames and 
his lady. My son Nathaniel. My sons Arthur, Pelathiah and William. 
My sou Samuel. My dear daughter Brooke. 

I give thirty pounds to be paid by ten poundsia year for the bringing up 

of children in living in the College of New England. My two 

brothers Arthur and Thomas. Faith, my sister. Reference to trusts in 
eases of the estate of Sir Calthrop Parker and my cousin Anne Clopton, 
Sir Simond D'Ewes his first lady. My nephew Henry Parker. My cou- 
sin the Lady Ann Maynard. My cousin George Barnardiston. 

Brent, 376. 

[The testator's wife was Jane, daughter of Sir Stephen Soame, Lord Mayor of 
London. I have already given the will of his step-mother, Dame Katherine 
Barnardiston, in the Register, vol. 47, pp. 3i)l>-7 (ante, pp. 742-43). The 
pedigree of Soame appears in the second volume of the Visitation of London 
1033-1'534 (IIai-1. So. Pub.) pp. 250-251. That of Barnardiston is given in Met- 
calfe's Vis. of Suffolk. Henry F. Waters. 

Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston, knt., was high sheriff of Suffolk in 23d of James 
I. His second son, Sir Samuel, is said to have been the first person to whom the 
name of Roundhead was applied. 

On his death he was the subject of many monodies in English, Greek and 
Latin, and published in a pamphlet entitled " Suf oik's Tears, or Elegies on that 
renowned Knight, Sir Nathaniel Barnardiston." He was a friend of John 
Winthrop and interested in his company. 

Thomas Barnardiston his grand-nephew married Mary Downing, daughter of 
Sir George (H. C. 1642), who entailed his whole estate on their son. 

(See Mass. Hist. Coll. 4th series, VI.).— W. K. Watkixs.] 

John Scott of South Hampton in the East Riding of New Yorkshire 
upon Long Island in New England, mariner, 19 April 1692, proved 4 June 
1692. All that my Seat or tract of land, being two lots or divisions, with 
all edifices &c. &c. belonging, lying ami being at Meacocks in the East 
Riding of New Yorkshire aforesaid and also one other tract near the head 
of Saccabonnocke River in the Riding aforesaid, with a parcel of meadow 
ground near Great Noyock River, with a fifty pound Commonage, and all 
other possessions belonging to me or which should descend unto me I do 
give, devise and bequeath unto my loving brother Jacamiah Scott of South- 
hampton aforesaid, yeoman, and his heirs male forever; and for default of 
heirs male then to female, provided that whomsoever they marry from time 
to time forever shall bear or assume unto themselves the sirname of Scott; 
and in default of such heirs I bequeath the same unto the heirs of my 
honored uncle Jonathan Raiuer of Southhampton aforesaid, yeoman, always 
provided that they from time to time assume unto themselves the sirname 
of Scott; next to my right heirs forever. And inasmuch as my said brother 
Jacamiah Scott, whom I do hereby ordain and appoint executor &c, is at a 
great distance from hence and not able to put this my will in execution in 
this place, I do hereby appoint William Clapcott of Stepney, sailmaker, 
executor in trust &c. Fane, 120. 



888 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

[The testator by his mention of his uncle, Jonathan Rainer, of Southampton, 
L. I., is evidently" son of that John Scott of notoriety, who married Deborah, 
daughter of Thurston Rainer and sister of Jonathan Rainer. 

John Scott senior had a career of interest, and was identified with many im- 
portant events in the early history of the country, not with credit, however, iu 
most instances. 

His own account in a petition states he was son of an Englishman of fortune, 
who lost his life in the royal cause. The son, for cutting the bridles and girths 
of the Parliamentary horses at Turnham Green in 1642, was brought before a 
committee and finally sent to New England, under care of E. Downing, arriving 
in Sept. 1643, and was placed under Lawrence Southwick, the Quaker, at Salem, 
Mass., as a servant. In May 1648 he was to serve him as much longer after his 
service expired as would amount to 35 shillings. 

In 1654 he was arrested by the Dutch at Long Island and sent to New Am- 
sterdam, and after a short imprisonment discharged. 

The same year an action was brought against him by a neighbor for defama- 
tion, but the affair was settled privately. 

He was made a freemau at Southampton in 1657, and 9 Dec. 1658 was granted 
a home lot of three acres, and five more provided he remain three years. March 
8, 1659-60, he bought at Southold a sloop of two Dutchmen, and 11 June fol- 
lowing half a ketch at the same place of Richard Raiment of Salem. 

He evidently commenced his career than as a mariner, as we find that he met 
in 1661 at Whitehall (Eng.) Daniel Gutherson and Dorothea his wife, who was 
a daughter of Thomas Scott of Eggertou, Kent, and claimed kinship as a mem- 
ber of the family of Scott, of Scott's Hall, and by persuasive means sold Guther- 
son lands he claimed to own on Long Island, and by such dealing ruining 
Gutherson, who was prevented by death from ever visiting this country; his 
son was placed in the care of Scott, and was by him sold as a servant to 
Herringman, an innkeeper at New Haven. 

Many people from Lynn, Mass., were vitimized by Scott, whose conveyance 
of lands, he said he got from the Indians, was found to be of no worth. 

We then find him interested in the Atherton Company, in the Narragansett 
Lands, and desiring to be made governor of Long Island. 

In 1663 Connecticut, exasperated by what she considered double dealing ou 
his part, ordered his arrest and confiscation of his estates. 

He escaped from prison, however, and in 1666 we find that he was obliged to 
take refuge in the Barbados. 

We next find him commanding an expedition iu 1667 as Major Scott at Toboga 
and Guiana, and later with the titles of colonel and vice-admiral. He also 
visited about this time Newfoundland, as we find by an address to the King iu 
1668 giving an account of the country from 1496, drawn from Scott's and other 
evidence. 

In the proceedings against Scott for fleecing her husband, widow Guther- 
son was greatly assisted by Samuel Pepys, the diarist, and for this Scott swore 
revenge, and later, on Scott joining the band of Titus Oates, implicated 
Pepys as a Papist, and this resulted in Pepys's confinement in the Tower, from 
which position he had hard work to extricate himself. 

After 1680 we lose sight of John Scott, and the date and manner of his death 
is unknown. 

(See Howell's Southampton, L. I.; N. Y. Colonial Documents, Vol. III.; 
Calendar of State Papers, Colonial ; Mass. Hist. Society Proceedings, Vol. VI. ; 
Dorothea Scott by G. D. Scull.)— W. K. Watkins.] 

Zacharye Goodyeare, citizen and vintner of London, 18 July 1613, 
proved 31 July 1613. To be buried in the parish church of St. Gregory 
near Paul's in London. To my loving mother ten pounds. To my cousin 
Mary Storye five pounds. The residue to my son Stephen Goodyere whom 
I make executor. I make, nominate and ordain my brothers John Par- 
tridge, scrivener, and Ralph Bowlton, merchant tailor, citizens of London, 
overseers. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 889 

Admon. granted (at above date) to Ralph Bowlton during the minority 
of Stephen Goody eere the sou, to whom issued commissiou 15 October 1624. 
he having reached full age. C'apell, 70. 

[The testator may be a kinsman, possibly the father of Stephen Goodyear of 
Connecticut.— H. F. W.] 

William Read; 

"The 9th daie of April 1656." My will is that my wife have three 
score pounds for herself. Item, thirty pounds apiece to each of my four 
youngest children. More, that my wife have the household stuff and to 
dispose of it: that the three score pounds which is owing to me by Mr. 
William Brentou in New England be disposed of as followeth, if it can be 
got. viz 1 ., to my wife twenty pounds, to my four youngest children twenty 
pounds (that is five pounds apiece), to my three children that are married 
in New England, that is, George. Ralph and Abigail, twenty pouuds to be 
equally divided amongst them : that when any of the four youngest children 
die their portion be divided among the other three, that is if they die in 
their minority: forty pounds due from Mr. Killingworth, twenty pounds 
Mark Theaton of Black Callerton, thirty pound from Mrs Flora Hall, 
twenty pound from Anthony Walker, twelve pounds, three pouud in my 
wife's hand and five pound in Mr. Ogle's Hand, forty pound more in the 
house; George Erington of Loughhouse and his son in law forty shillings, 
Gawan Anderson forty shillings ; Mary Chicken als Watson four pound ten 
shillings and ten shillings in my wife's hand, is nine pound: more in the 
house twenty shillings in Commodities; in all makes nine score pounds. 
The mark of William Read. 

Wit: William Cutter, the mark of Thomas Gibson. 

Commission issued 31 October 1G56 uuto Mabel Read, widow, the relict 
and principal legatary of the deceased, to administer &c. according to the 
tenor and effect of the said will &c. Berkley, 346. 

[The place of residence of William Read, the testator of the above will, was 
not declared, but the Probate Act Book foi the year 1656 shows it to have been 
Newcastle upon Tyne (Northumberland). According to Savage he was of Dor- 
chester (Massachusetts), a passenger in the Defence 1635, aged 48, with wife 
Mabel 30, George 6, Ralph 5 and Justus 18 months, had at Dorchester Abigail 
baptized 30 Dec. 1638, was freeman 14 March 1639 ; removed probably first to 
Rehoboth, or perhaps lived at Woburn. His sons George and Ralph seem to 
have lived in Woburn. Henry F. Waters. 

An account of William Reed, the testator, and his descendants forms Chapter 
IV. (pages 61 to 150) of the " History of the Reed Family," by Jacob Whitte- 
more Reed, published iu 1861. The author of this book states that this William 
Reed was the oldest of any of the Puritan emigrants to New England by the 
name of Reed, and that his wife Mabel's maiden surname was Kendall. He 
also states that he removed from Dorchester to Scituate, aud thence to Woburn. 
He does not name Rehoboth as a residence. — Editor. 

William Read, or Reed, for some years lived in Woburn, and is the common 
ancestor of most of the Reed family here. July 7, 1648, Nicholas Davis of 
Charlestown sold to William Reade of Muddy River a house and lands iu 
Woburn, described in a bill of sale recorded in Suffolk Deeds, Book 1, page 93. 
This estate passed from William Reed to Samuel Walker, senior; and, in 
1674, the latter gave a deed of it to his sou Samuel Walker, who, in 1662, mar- 
ried Sarah, daughter of said William Reed. In this deed the estate isreferred 
to as that purchased of William Reed, and it remained in the Walker family 
until 1847. 



890 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

According to the Woburn Records William Reed remained in Woburn as late 
as 1652. lie returned to England shortly after that date with his wife Mabel 
and their youngest children. After her husband's death, in 1656, the widow 
Mabel returned to Woburn, and, as administratrix of her husband's estate, 
caused ancillary administration to be taken out in Middlesex County, Feb. 17, 
1661-2. The original papers brought from England are missing from the pro- 
bate files at Cambridge, but the official record of the will and the letter testa- 
mentary are still preserved there. This record varies slightly from the wording 
as given above by Mr. Waters, but the only important difference in the two copies 
is, that the name Abigail in Mr. Waters's transcript appears as Michael in the 
record at the Probate Office at Cambridge. Abigail is undoubtedly correct; for, 
apart from the supposed reference to Michael in the fathers will, as recorded at 
Cambridge, there is no evidence of his existence. Abigail married Francis 
Wyinan of Woburn, and together with her brothers, George and Ralph, lived 
and died in Woburn. Among the court files in the clerk of court's office at Cam- 
bridge, can be found a suit, of date 1658, which gives an interesting but un- 
publishable episode in the histories of the two families of Ralph and George 
Reed. The latter gave his age in court, in 1659, as " 30 years or thereabouts." 
The widow, Mabel Reed, married Henry Summers, senior, of Woburn, Nov. 
21, 1660, and died in Woburn, in 1600, aged 85. 

William Cutter, a witness to the above will of William Reed, came to New 
England, but afterwards returned to Newcastle-upon-Tyne, his former home. 

The will of Thomas Reede, given above, adds three names to the sons of 
William Reed, hitherto unknown to us, and for this reason is of special interest 
to the Reed family in this country. Edward F. Johnson.] 

Thomas Reede of Newcastle upon Tyne, yeoman, 2 January 1G56, 
proved 25 November 1657. To my son Charles Errington one thirty 
second part {%. e. one fourth of my eighth part) of the coal mines and 
colliery called the Woodside Colliery in the parish oi Riton, Durham. 
My grandchild Anne Errington. To my brother Henry Reede's two sons 
live pounds apiece to put them to apprenticeships. To William Lisle five 
pounds, hoping he will be careful to be aiding and assisting unto my wife 
Anne Reede in and about the managing of my estate. And for my little 
cousin Thomas Reede, son of my brother John Reede deceased, I leave 
him to the disposing of my wife Anne Reede, having had full experience 
of her charity, respect and good will towards him. The rest to my wife 
Anne, so long as she continue my widow. In case she intermarry with any 
other person then I give and bequeath unto my daughter Ann Errington 
five hundred pounds out of such estate. My wife to he executrix if she 
do not intermarry &c, otherwise my daughter Ann Errington. Reference 
to an indenture between Mark Errington of Westdenton Esq. and the 
testator. Charles Errington, son of said Mark. Gilbert Errington, son 
and heir of the said Mark. 

Proved by Ann Errington, conditional executrix. Ruthen, 469. 

Valentine Moretoft of London, gen 1 ., day of 1641, 

proved 24 September 1 041 . To be buried in the church of Great St. 
llellens in London and a little small monument to be provided and such a 
one as is the monument of Sir Richard Cock which standeth near the 
Clock house in Westui 1 . Abbey, with a gravestone and sub inscription 
thereupon to be provided and laid upon me. Wife Margaret. Eldest son 
William Moretoft. A gold ring that was his mother's. Son Francis. 
Daughter Margaret Moretoft. All these children at twenty one. My 
brother in law M r . John Glover. My nephew William Crane. My nephew 
Robert Crane. My brother Colchester. My brother Havers. My nephew 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 891 

George Aldrich. My loving friends Alderman Gore, Alderman Addams, 
Mr. Francis Flier, my brother Mr. Gilbert Havers, my cousin Mr. Richard 
Glover. Mr. Thomas Vinar, Mr. Rice Williams and Mr. John Greene, 
mercer. Valentine Aldrich son of my nephew George Aldrich. My 
niece Sturtivant. My cousin Francis Mortoft and my cousin William 
Mortoft of Itringham in Norfolk and their children. My brother John 
Crane's children, William, Thomas, John, Robert. Henry, Valentine, 
Frances. Richard Crane, my niece Mary Foulkes, Anne Crane, Dorothy 
Crane, my niece Phillis Ilildar and Fliza Crane. My Lady Hamersley, 
my mother in law. My brother in law Sir Thomas Hamersley. My sister 
Cogan. My sister Benthall. My brother Smith. My brother Masters. 
My brother William Hamersley. My sister Elisabeth Glover. 

Commission issued "20 May lG74to Margaret Fyneux ah Moretoft, a 
daughter, to administer, the executors John Crane and Margaret Moretoft 
being dead. Evelyn, 113. 

[See Glover wills, Register vol. 38, p. 423; vol. 47, pp. 499-504 {ante, pp. 
772-78). See also Vis. of Loudon, 1633-4, Vol. II., p. 113.— H.F.W.] 

Jerman Maior of Faiths, citizen and draper of London, 1 October 1GG0, 
with a codicil dated 10 April 1GG1 and a second 2G September 16G1, proved 
5 October 16G1. I have fully advanced in marriage my daughters Dorothy 
Swanwicke and Deborah Wood. In this will I give to my wife Deborah 
and my son and heir Thomas Maior, to each of them a greater estate than 
they or either of them can or may claim by the Laudable Custom of the 
City of London. My son in law Thomas Swanwicke, who married my 
daughter Dorothy, is indebted unto me four hundred pounds, for the secur- 
ing whereof he hath engaged an Annuity of twenty pounds issuing out of 
the several houses at Horsey Down which I formerly gave my daughter 
his wife. This sum I give to and among the four children of my said 
dauglner, viz 1 . Deborah, Dorothy, Maior and Samuel Swanwick. To my 
daughter Deborah Wood, wife of John Wood silkman, one hundred pounds 
in performance of my promise to her husband that I would give him that 
sum within six mouths after my decease. To the three children of my said 
daughter, viz' Deborah, Mary and Dorothy Wood, three hundred pounds. 
To my grandchildren Samuel and Deborah Leadbetter, each one hundred 
pounds. All these grandchildren under twenty one. To my brother 
Thomas Maior ten pounds. To my cousin Mauley's wife, to my cousin 
Ann Jones (now in New England) to each of them live pounds apiece. 
To my partner Josuah Pordage five pounds to buy him a mourning cloak. 
To my servant Anne Leete twenty pounds. Mr. Jackson minister of the 
parish wherein I lived. My two brothers in law Thomas St. Nicholas and 
John St. Nicholas. The poor of Preston, Bucks, where I was born. My 
cousin Sandford, widow. I will that mourning shall be given at my funeral 
to my wife, children, grandchildren and servants and to no others, and the 
" soiempiiity of my funerall " shall be performed without any great cost, 
only a gold ring and no more to every one that shall be at my funeral. 
The residue to wife and son Thomas, who shall be joint executors. My 
two sons in law Thomas Swanwick and John Wood to be overseers. To 
my kinswoman Katherine Gladen twenty shillings. The first codicil recites 
(among other things) that Deborah Leadbetter had since the will been 
otherwise provided for in a more plentiful manner. The legacy of five 
pounds to cousin Ann Jones (now in New England) is revoked. 

May, 1G0. 



892 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Joshua Pordage (residence not given) 17 February 1690-1, proved 
18 June 1691. Certain household stuff to wife which she brought to me 
as a part of her portion. Sorry my condition is such that I cannot further 
in this my will express my love to her. To my loving sister Mrs. Susan 
Davis of Bristol ten pounds. If my son George Pordage of Boston in 
New England do make up a fair and honest account with my executor of 
all moneys and goods he has of mine in hands on the commission account 
and do also clear and pay what he owes me on his own particular account 
I do then give and bequeath unto him the sum of forty pounds. I give 
unto my son Sam: Pordage now also beyond the seas the sum of ten pounds. 
To my kinswoman Mrs. Ann Mason five pounds. If any remainder of 
estate I bequeath it equally between my two sons George and Sam: Pordage, 
or the survivor, though I gave my son George a considerable portion at his 
first going over and, in regard his solicitations were earnest for his brother's 
coming to him, I expect he will consider my circumstances and take the 
care of him. And I do make my loving kinsman Thomas Major sole 
executor, to whom I give five pounds as a token of my love and respect. 

Vere, 103. 

[In the Probate Act Book for the above year (1691) the testator is styled late 
of the parish of St. Boltolph's Bishopsgate, London.— H. F. W. 

George Pordage or Portage, merchant, resided in Boston as early as 1685. 
By his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Simon Lynde, he had children born here 
from 1685 to 1696. He is'mentioned frequently in the " Diaries of Benjamin 
Lynde and Benjamin Lynde, Jr." (Boston, 1880), they being his brother-in-law 
and his nephew. His daughter Hannah married James Bowdoin, and was 
the mother of James Bowdoin, governor of Massachusetts. (See Savage's 
Genealogical Diet., vol. 3, p. 459; Boston Town and Church Records, 1630- 
1699, published by the Record Commission.) — Editor.] 

John Piggott, citizen and grocer of Loudon, 26 September 1639, proved 
30 September 1639. My body to be buried in the West side of Hackney 
churchyard, Middlesex, where I now live, with a stoue to be laid over me. 
To my wife Garthred Pigott three thousand pounds. To my cousin John 
Evelne (Evelin) of Godstone, Surrey, Esq. one thousand pounds within a 
year &c. To Susanna, Anne and Sarah Barcock daughters of Edmund 
Barcock two hundred pounds apiece within a year &c. To the said Ed- 
mund Barcocke and Alice his wife ten pounds apiece. To Thomas Steven- 
ton citizen and grocer of London for the good of his son John Steventon 
two hundred pounds within a year &c. To Margaret Lambert, now ser- 
vant unto the aforesaid John Evelin Esq., five pounds. To Elinor now 
servant unto young Mr. Evelin forty shillings. To Fill now servant unto 
Mrs Thomasine Evelin forty shillings. To Mr Eveliu's youngest daughter's 
nurse and unto her now servant forty shillings apiece. Similar bequests to 
the falconer, clerk, coachman, groom, bailiff, dairymaid and others in the 
service 0^ Mr. Evelin. To the poor of Godstone five pounds. To John 
Smithiman of Booking, clothier, and his wife ten pounds apiece aud to his 
eldest son ten pounds. To Doctor Downinge now vicar of Hackney five 
pounds. To my cousin Hatton and his wife now living at Dynton in Sur- 
rey ten pounds apiece. The poor of St. Peters Cornhill and of St. Bennet 
Fincke. To my father Goodwine and his wife ten pounds apiece. To 
my brother Stone and his wife five pounds apiece. To my sisters Elizabeth 
and Sara Goodwin five pounds apiece. To my brothers Matthew, Peter 
and James Goodwin five pounds apiece. To Mr. Eveliu's four children 
now living two hundred pounds apiece. To my auut Jeunye ten pounds. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 893 

To Jane Goo-hvine, widow, five pounds. To Mrs Eveliu now wife of John 
Evelin Esq. of Godstone two hundred pounds. To my aunt Brushe five 
and twenty pounds. To my cousin Woodward and li is wife ten pouuds 
apiece. To Mrs. Lawrence now wife of John Lawrence ten pounds and 
to all his children five pounds apiece. To my cousin Windsor, widow, ten 
pounds and all Mr. Ilatton's (aforesaid) sons and daughters ten pounds 
apiece. To my brother Thomas Piggott fourteen pounds a year during his 
life, which will make up with six and thirty pounds per annum, which I am 
to pay by bond, fifty pounds a year. The rest to my wife Garthred whom 
I make sole executrix. Harvey, 146. 

Peter Goodwyn citizen and Salter of London, 28 October 1661, proved 
17 December 1661. To be buried near wife in parish church of St. Mar- 
garet " Pattones," London, not expending thereon above two hundred 
pounds. To my sons in law Maurice Abbott, Esquire, John Osborne and 
William Elwood forty shillings apiece for three rings. To my grand- 
children Susanna, John, James, Elizabeth, Abigail and Peter Stone, or to 
so many of them as shall be put forth to trades or preferments, ten pounds 
apiece. To the poor of the parish forty shillings and to the reparations of 
the church ten pounds. To the Company of Salters ten pounds and also 
the sum of one and twenty pounds or thereabouts which I disbursed long 
since for the Plantations in Ireland. To certain almsmen of the Company 
&c. To my daughter Gartred the wife of Maurice Abbott Esq. one an- 
nuity of ten pounds per annum. To my daughter Susanna Stone, widow, 
another annuity of twenty pounds. To my daughter Sarah wife of Wil- 
liam Elwood Junior another annuity of ten pounds. These annuities pay- 
able out of my lands and tenements in St. Michael Cornhill. To my eldest 
son Matthew Goodwyn the dwelling house in St. Margaret " Patternes," 
in or near Tower Street, my lands in Trinity Lane in the parish of Trinity 
the Less, and my lands, tenements &c. in Poplar alias Blackwall in the 
parish of Stebunheath alias Stepney, Middlesex. To my second son Peter 
certain lands, tenements &c. in St. Michaels Cornhill, three of the tene- 
ments being by the street side and all the rest behind them in an Alley 
called Harp Alley; certain annuities payable out of them. To my youngest 
son James six tenements in St. Margaret Pattens adjoining to the East side 
of my dwelling house there. Lands in the manor of Hackney to my eldest 
son Matthew. To those other my grandchildren, viz* the children of Gar- 
tred, of Matthew, of Sarah and of my son James, to each of them five 
pounds. Matthew, Peter and James Goodwyn to be executors. 

The will was proved, as above, by the oath of James Goodwyn son and 
one of the executors, power reserved for Matthew and Peter the other 
executors &c. May, 198. 

[The pedigree of this familv of Goodwin will be found in the Visitation of 
London, 1GS3-4-5 (pub. bytheHarl. Soc), vol. 1, p. 325. The will of Robert 
Goodwin, the father of Peter (whose will is given above"), appeared in my 
Gleanings for October, 1893 {ante, p. 771). The match of John Pigot (or 
Pigott) with Gartrude, a daughter of Peter Goodwin, is shown on the pedigree. 
It is evident that she afterwards was married to Maurice Abbott, Esq. 

Henry F. Waters.] 

Thomas Grene of Stanford Ryvers Essex, yeoman, 23 March 1534, 
proved 12 January 1537. To be buried in the chancel of the parish church 
of Stanford Ryvers if it fortune me there to die. And if I " happ " to die 
in the parish of Cotred in Hertfordshire then I will my body to be buried 



894 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

in the chancel of the church there before the image of Our Lady. A 
tenement called Colyns in Cheping Onger. A croft lying in Shelley. A 
pasture and meadow in High Onger. The poor of Kelvedon, Stondon, 
High Onger, Shelley, Bobyngworth and Grynsted. My lauds and tene- 
ments in Much Parndon, Essex. I will have a good honest and discreet 
priest secular to sing and pray for my soul &c. within the parish church 
whereat my body shall be buried by the space of twenty years next ensuing 
my decease. And I bequeath to the same priest every year yearly during 
the same twenty years for his salary or wages six pounds thirteen shillings 
four pence, to be paid by the hands of William Lake former of my manor 
of Belhouse, or the farmer for the time being, out of the yearly rent of ten 
pounds thereupon arrented and reserved. And the three pounds six shil- 
lings eight pence yearly residue of the said yearly rent of ten pounds I give 
and bequeath unto Elizabeth my wife during her life. After the end of the 
said twenty years all the said manor of Belhows &c. shall remain to Richard 
Elyott, sou and heir of the said Elizabeth my wife &c. Remainder to my 
right heirs. My brother William Grene. The said Richard Elyot shall 
have a certain tenement and free lands in Lughborowe in the Co. of Lei- 
cester and all my lands in Cotred that I bought of Raufe Wilson. An 
obligation to John Bolles Esq. and diverse other gentlemen friends of the said 
Elizabeth. William Cammeswell, which married ray wile's suster, and Agnes 
his daughter. John Bacon, which married my wife's suster, and his wife. 
John Fisher which married my wife's daughter. Thomas Bedell my ser- 
vant. Others. Thomas Herde. John Herde and George, his brother. 
John and Thomas, sons of William Lake. Cheping Ongar where I was 
bom. My daughter Alice. My bastard daughter Joane, at day of mar- 
riage. My brother Richard Barley. My cousin Richard Sharp and 
Agnes his sister and Joane Engolde his sister's daughter. Robert and 
Thomas Sharp sons of John Sharp, brother to the said Richard. Three 
children of my sister, late wife of William Banaster. My cousins John Sayer, 
Thomas Sayer and Nicholas Seyer. Robert Parnell my first wife's son. 
William Stokes of Much Badfield (Bardfield?) late husband to Joane, 
daughter of my second wife. John Parke, Margaret Hunt, Amye Spore 
and Margaret Pease, children of my second wife. John. James and Robert 
Fynche sous of Thomas Fynche of Theydon Mount. Alice Alsopp, 
Thomasin Tynian, Christian Reynoldes, Clemens Bardall, Margaret Pule 
and Beatrice Monk, daughter to Thomas Monk late of Stanford Ryvers. 

Dyngeley, 13. 

George Ei.lyot of Stertford, Herts, Esq., 12 January 1548, proved 
29 January 1554. My body to be buried in such place as it shall please 
Allmighty God to provide and ordain for me. My burial to be decent and 
honest without any manner of pomp or pride of this world. I will have 
the "lest" (least) bell rung one hour for me at the time of mine exequies. 
I bequeath to my eldest brother John Eliott five pounds. I bequeath to 
John Eliott my youngest brother five pounds. To my brother Robert Eliott 
five pounds; and more to the said Robert four pounds by the year during his 
]ife as appeareth out of the manor of Upweke. To my brother Thomas Eliott 
five pounds. To and amongst my said four bretheru, indifferently between 
them to be divided, all such and as much of mine apparell as I shall leave un- 
bequeathed. To my sister Johan Ileynes five pounds. To William Pereson, 
citizen and scrivener of Loudon, my best gown furred with martens. My 
household stuff and plate shall be divided equally between Magnus, George 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN" ENGLAND. S ( J5 

ami Kateryn Sparoke my children. And to George Eliott my sou two hun- 
dred pounds of mouey current. The residue to Magnus and George my 
children, equally between them to be divided, and to be delivered when 
thev. or either of them, shall accomplish and come to their lawful age of 
twenty one years. And of this my present testament &c. I make John 
Sparke and John Eliott of London mercer and William Thomson citizen 
and draper of London, my executors, and I give to every of them five 
pounds. And I make my friends Thomas Bonde, mercer, John Eliott of 
Stertford and the aforesaid William Person mine overseers. 

Wit. John Eliot mercer, John Sparke, George Eliott, Thomas Eliott and 
William Pyerson. 

Then follows his last will (disposing of his lands) made 8 September 
1551. My manor of Upweke Hall and lands &c. in Aldbery, Little 
Hadham, Farneham and Stortford in Essex and Herts to Magnus Eliott 
my son. To George Eliott my son my tenement called Telles and tene- 
ment called Grenes and lands called Hallywell lands containing eighty one 
acres and my tenement in Little Hadham and my tenement new-builded some 
time called Francis and now called Eliotts new house, now in the tenure of 
Simone Eliott. If both my sons Magnus and George Eliott die without issue 
males of their bodies lawfully begotten I bequeath my manor aforesaid to 
my daughter Katherin Sparke during her life, to remain after her disease to 
John Elyott of London mercer and his heirs male &c, and for lack of such 
heirs male to remain to the heirs male of Henry Eliott of Lanocke; and the 
lands bequeathed to George I also give to my daughter Katherine, remainder 
to Henry Eliott of Lanocke &c. then to the right heirs male of Joh-n Eliott 
of London mercer. And for lack of heirs male of the said John and 
Henry remainder to my right heirs forever. To my brother, Robert Eliott 
of Hunsdon four pounds yearly during his life natural. To John Sparke 
and Katerin his wife my messuage in Stortford that I now dwell in some- 
time called the Bull. Sons Magnus and George in their nonage. 

Wit. John Eliott of Wickham Hall, John Eliott of London, Richard 
Fletcher curate and Richard Pilston. 

In the original will there is a bequest to Peter Ellyot obliterated and the 
word " ded " written above the obliteration. More, 12. 

Thomas Elyot of Wydford 26 November 1551, proved 13 November 
1554. My body to be buried in the church yard of the parish aforesaid. 
Item I bequeath to the reparation of the said church two thousand tyles, 
ready carried and laid in the church yard at the cost and charge of Thomas 
Elyot my sou, at such time as the next reparations shall be done there. 
Item I will and give to the poor mens chest six shillings eight pence. 
Item I will the cupboard and table standing in the hall still to remain and 
continue as implements of the house. Item I will the four chests, whereof 
two of them are black the other two white, and also four bedsteads to remain 
as implements to the household. Item I will and give to my son Thomas 
Elyot and to his heirs male of his body lawfully begotten my house and all 
my lands, being freehold, situate and lying in the said parish of Widford and 
in the parish of Ware. And if the said Thomas die without issue male 
lawfully of him begotten then I will the said house and lands to my son John 
Elyot and to his heirs male of his body lawfully begotten. And for lack 
of issue male as before mentioned of the said Thomas and John my 
sons then I will the said house and lands lineally to descend to the next 
heirs male of the .-train and kindred of me the forenamed Thomas Elyot 



896 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

father to the said Thomas and John and also testator of the said house and 
lands. Item I will also the two cobirons standing in the hall chimney 
" thone being bygger then thother" to remain implements to the house. 
Also I will and desire Thomas Elyot and John Elyot my sons to be my 
executors and my son Symon Elyot overseer. 

Witness Thomas Mylls, William Parnell John Isacke jun. John Coke 
Sen. John Coke jun. 

Book Garland, Com. Court of London 
(Essex and Herts) fol. 25. 

John Haynes at ye Mylles in the parish of Much Iladham, 20 July 
1551. To be buried in the churchyard of Much Iladham. To George 
my son all my houses, tenements, lands, rents, reversions and services, with 
all the appurtenances that I have and of right ought to have, within the 
parishes of Much Hadham, Little Hadham, Wydford and Thorley or 
elsewhere. To Joanne my wife, during her natural life, six pounds thirteeu 
shillings and four pence to be paid unto her yearly by my said son George 
Haynes, his heirs executors or assigns. My said wife shall have her cham- 
ber and meat and drink during her life with my said son and at his charges 
at Iladham Mill or where he shall dwell and if my said wife be not content 
and " mynded " so' to remain with my son then she to have my house with 
the appurtenances in Iladham " Strate " (street) which I bought of Hugh 
Grave that William Laugham now dwelleth in, during her life, over and 
besides her said annuity of six pounds thirteen shillings four pence. If my 
said wife do go to that my house in Hadham " streate " then and from thence- 
forth yearly during her abiding there my said son &c. shall deliver her at 
his or their proper charges four loads of firewood at the said house. To 
my said wife ten pounds worth of household stuff. To Joane my daughter, 
the wife of Nicolles Lambarde five pounds, to be paid within one year next 
after my decease ; and if she shall live five years next after the receipt of the 
five pounds then and from thenceforth during her life every year ten shillings 
to be paid by George my son, his heirs, executors or assigns. To my 
daughter Elizabeth the wife of Robert Ive, over and besides such money 
as the said Robert (Ive) oweth me, three pounds, six shillings and eight 
pence. To my daughter Agnes the late wife of John Grave, over and 
besides such money as she oweth me, three pounds six shillings and eight 
pence. To my daughter " Cateren " the wife of Simond Elyett forty shillings 
To my daughter julyan the wife of John Clere forty shillings. All these 
to be paid within one year after my decease. To Joane the daughter of 
Richard my son ten pounds at the day of her marriage. " I wille that 
Iminedyatlye after my decease that myne Executors do guide some dyscrete 
and godlye learnede Pryste to preache Seven Sarmondes at suche conve- 
nyent days & tymes as shalbe thought moste mette vidett att Myche 
Iladhm thre att Lyttell Iladlnn towe & att Wydforde the other two & ye 
same preste to be honestlye contented as shalbe thought goode by ye 
dyscresyon of myne executors." Forty shillings to the poor at my burial. 
Four pounds to the reparation of the highways. Four pence to every of 
my godchildren. The rest to my son George, whom with Edward Russell 
I make executors and Mr. Thomas Hanchett to be supervisor, to whom a 
Royal of gold. 

Thomas Neuce a witness. 

Proved 20 October 1550 (Qu. 1556?). 

Garland, 133 (Com. Essex and Herts). 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 897 

Gkorgk Haynes of Much Iladham, Herts, yeoman, 9 November 1584, 
proved 4 January 1584. To the poor of Much Hadham and of Little 
Iladham. To George Haynes my son my tenement or farm in Little 
Iladham called Caley alias Caldwyns, late in the tenure of Symon Clarke, 
aud another parcel of land called Wickham (and some laud in Stondon). 
But my wife Agnes shall have the use aud profit of the said lands &c. until 
my said son George shall come to his full age of twenty one years. To 
wife Agnes in recompeuce of dower certain lands in Aldbury, Thorley &c, 
for life, with remainder to Edmond Haynes my son and to his heirs forever. 
To my son John Hayues all other my lands and tenements in Much Ilad- 
ham and Little Hadham &c. to him and his heirs forever. And I do clearly 
and freely forgive my son John all such rents arid arrearages of rent as he 
doth in any wise owe unto me out of or for my messuage &c. which he hath 
or doth hold of mine situate and being in Much Iladham. To Mary my 
daughter one hundred pounds at day of marriage or age of twenty one. 
To my said son John eleven silver spoons, a silver gilt goblet and my mid- 
dlemost mazer bound with silver. To sons George and Edmond twenty 
pounds each at one and twenty. Other gifts of silver and household goods 
to children. Son John to pay a yearly annuity of ten shillings unto Mar- 
garet Horseley during her natural life. The remainder to wife Agnes, sole 
executrix. Son John Haynes and William Hampton to be overseers. 

Brudenell, 1. 

Tiiosias Ellvott citizen and leatherseller of London, 31 August 1557, 
proved 15 October 1557. My body to be buried in the parish church of 
St. Vedast alias St. Fosters whereof I am now a •' pochioner." To the 
High Altar of that church, for Tithes and Oblations by me negligently for- 
gotten, if any such be, three shillings four pence. To the company of 
Leathersellers for their pains taking in following my body to the church upon 
the day I shall be buried, twenty shillings for a recreation among them. 
To the reparation of the church of Wydforde six shillings eight pence in 
money. To Bassabie Elliott five marks, to be delivered unto her at the 
day of her marriage, and not before. I will and my mind is that William 
Wilkinson son of William Wilkinson, late of London merchant tailor deceased, 
shall have twenty pounds in money which his father gave him by his last 
will, to be delivered unto him at his lawful age of twenty one years, and not 
before. If he die before that then it shall come to mine executrix. Whereas 
my brother Henry Ellyott mercer oweth me twenty-five pounds as appeareth 
in my book, written with his own hand the 25th day of May 1554, I do 
freely release and forgive him the said debt and every part thereof. I 
give to my father my gown of " browne Blewe " furred with budge and my 
doublet " sieved" with russet velvet. I give to my brother Henry Elliott 
my satin doublet and two of my best coats and my gown faced with damask. 
The residue of all my movable goods &c. I give to my well beloved wife 
Margery whom I make my sole executrix. And I will and my mind is 
that if it fortune the said Margery my wife to marry that she shall, " afore " 
her marriage, pay, distribute aud bestow among my brothers' children forty 
pounds in money or movable goods without any longer delay. And I desire 
my uncle John Ellyott of Stratford (Stortford) in the Co. of Hartford and 
John Elliott his son, of London mercer, to be overseers &c. and I give and 
bequeath to the said John Ellyot the father my gown of " pewcke " faced 
with satin and to the said John Elliot the son my ring of gold with a seal 
in the same. 



898 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

(Then follows his last will disposing of his lands and tenements., 
All my lands, tenements &c. in the town, parish and fields of Wydforde 
in the Co. of Hertford, which John Ellyott and Johan Ellyott his wife, my 
father and mother, do now occupy during their natural lives &c, after their 
decease I bequeath to Margery my wife for life, if she do so long keep her- 
self a widow sole and unmarried, she paying my said father aud mother 
forty shillings a year which I now stand charged to pay unto them during 
their lives &c. ; next to John Elliott, son and heir of John Ellyot my eldest 
brother now dwelling in Waltham, Essex (on condition of payment of a cer- 
tain sum to be divided amongst the rest of the children of testator's brothers 
and sisters). Wrastley, 37. 

John Elyott of Stortford parsonage within the diocese of London, 
22 October 1557. To Margaret my wife my lease of the tythe and parson- 
age of Stortford &c. to have and to hold during her natural life, if she live 
so long unmarried, to remain after her decease, or after the time that she do 
marry again, unto Rowland my son and to the issue of his body lawfully begot- 
ten, and, for lack of issue of his body lawfully begotten, to remain to Edward 
my son &c. &c, then to George my son &c. &c. ; provided always that if 
Margaret my wife do marry again then Rowland my son, or any other en- 
joying my said lease, shall pay unto my said wife ten pounds a year every 
year during her life (in two half yearly payments). I give unto " Tabett " 
my daughter forty pounds aud unto Alice my daughter forty pounds, the 
money to be paid unto both my foresaid daughters at their marriage. I 
give and bequeath unto every child that my daughters Agnes Pylston, 
Blythe Hanes and Wynnyfryde Pyston (sic) hath at this time living, to 
every of them one ewe and one lamb. To every child that Richard Grave 
or his wife hath now living, to every of them twenty pence, saving to John 
Elyott her eldest son, unto whom I give aud bequeath twenty shillings. 
I do give unto Edward my son one hundred pounds of lawful money 
which I have delivered unto John my son when I did deliver him his own 
part. I give unto Margaret my wife all other my goods, movable and im- 
movable, she paying my debts and performing this my last will in manner 
aforesaid, whom I make mine sole executrix and John my son mine over- 
seer. 

Wit : Richard Ilubbert and Richard Pylston. 

To Rowland my son my lease of the mill called Parson's Mill. To 
Alyce my daughter one bill of four pounds due to be paid to me by Thomas 
Passon gen*. To Besse Eve a croft called Pery croft. To every child 
that George my sou hath living one ewe and one lamb. 

By me, John Ellyott mercer. 
Original Wills, Com. of Londou, Essex and Herts, Le Bundells, E. E. 1. 

Edward Eliot of Newland near Writtle in the Co. of Essex Esq., 22 
December 1505, proved 15 May 1596, My body I will to be buried in 
the parish church of Writtle in reverent wise I give and bequeath unto 
Thomas Elliott mine eldest son my manor of Wicombes ah Wickehames &c. 
for and during the natural life of Jane my loving wife, desiring her that she 
will not challenge ov demand any dower of or in the same. And after the 
decease of my said wife I will that the said manor &c. shall remain and go 
unto Edward Elliott my second sen &c. To John Eliott my third son my 
land- ami tenements commonly railed Priors in the parish of Bromefield or 
other parishes adjoining, now in the tenure of M 1 . Glascocke. To Mr. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 899 

Jenour the minister at Norton the entire profits and tithes of the parsonage 
of Norton for life if lie so long continue resident there. To son Edward a 
yearly rent of ten pounds to be issuing out of my said manor of Wicombes 
during the natural life of my wife. All other my manors, lands, tenements 
&c. I give and bequeath to my said wife during the term of her natural 
life and after her decease to Thomas Eliott my said eldest son &c. To my 
daughter Hannah three hundred pounds, at day of marriage or age of 
twenty two. And the same to daughter Jaue at marriage or twenty one, 
and daughter Elizabeth at marriage or twenty one. To my daughter Collen 
twenty pounds. To my brother Bogas the like sum of twenty pounds over 
and above all such sums as my son, her husband, oweth unto me. My will 
is, any former bequest notwithstanding, that threescore acres of my lands 
and woods, parcel of my manor of Wicombs, lying from the manor house- 
ward beyond Bushey mellowes and Catsborough fields and my house and 
lands in Gingemargaret als Margatinge and my copyhold land in Writtle 
and my lease of the manor of Little Broxted and my lease of my new 
buildings in New Inn, Middlesex, shall be sold for and towards the payment 
and performance of my debts and legacies. To my brother Butler five 
pounds to buy him a ring. To my sister Butler ten pounds. To my 
nephew M r . Barners ten pounds. To every other of my sister Butlers chil- 
dren twenty shillings. To my brother George Eliot and his three sons 
twenty pounds which my said brother oweth unto me. To my sister 
Pulisden four pounds by the year for life. To Mr. Josline minister at 
Good Easter five pounds. To my cousin Iluckle and his wife five pounds. 
To M r . Kendall of Roxwell twenty shillings. To the poor of Roxwell, 
Newland, Writtle and Good Ester. To my cousin Quarles fifty shillings 
for a ring and to Priscilla Quarles my god daughter fifty shillings. My 
wife Jane to be sole executrix. 

Wit : John Butler, Richard Glascocke, John Collen, Stephen Collen. 

Drake, 42. 

Mense Maij 1602 Octauo die emanauit comissio Dorothee Collen als 
Elliott et Ilanne Pinchon als Elliot sororibus naturalibus et l'timis Edwardi 
Elliot nug de Newland in Coiu Essex def. Ilentis etc. ad admistrand bona 
jura et credita dci def. &c. Admon. Act Book Jo. 117. 

Robert Morley, in his will made 2 February 1598 and proved 16 
October 1G02, mentions sister Agnes Cave, widow, and niece Agnes Cave, 
her daughter. Anthony Cave, her eldest son and Robert Cave, her youngest 
son (under fifteen years of age) William Cave, her third scm Thomas Cave 
her second son. lie then makes the following bequest: I give also a 
diamond of twelve pounds price to Mistress Ellyot daughter to Master 
Nowell Sotherton and wife to Master Thomas Elliot of Belhouse in 
Stamford Rivers in Essex, to my father, to my uncle Ifaubury, my niece 
Joane Kuighte, my brother Master Thomas Neale and his wife, my brothers 
Fleetwood, Walter and Francis Neale, my cousin Thomas Redman and 
his wife Mistress Anne Redman, Master Thomas Conyers the younger, 
Master Alexander Williams and Master Thomas Ellyot of Belhouse in 
Essex I give rings of thirty shillings apiece, twelve pounds I give to my 
cousin Robert Bowyer of the Middle Temple, which though it come nothing 
near either his deserts or my love towards him, yet I beseech him to accept 
it as also of mine executorship in which I join him with my brother Master 
Thomas Neale. Montague, 68. 



900 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

John Myllett of Ilunsdon, Herts, yeoman, 22 July 1003. proved 28 
April 1604. The poor of Hunsdon and of Much Munden, Herts. My 
sister Mary Hadsley's three daughters Priscilla, Sara and Damoras Sain- 
forde. My brother in law John Hadesley, at his now dwelling house in 
Much Iladham. My sister Clark's three children at the now dwelling 
house of my said sister in Withersfield, Essex. My brother in law Allen's 
children. An Indenture bearing date the thirtieth day of January in the 
sixth and thirtieth year of the reign of our late sovereign Lady Queen 
Elizabeth, made between me the said John Millet of the one party and 
Thomas Woode of Harlow in the Co. of Essex, shoemaker, William Woode 
of Eppinge in the said Co. of Essex, shoemaker, and Faruando Elliott of 
Epping aforesaid, innholder, of the other party, by which I did covenant and 
grant that I should well and truly pay unto James Elliot, my now wife 
Katherine's eldest son, the sum of forty pounds and to Daniel Elliot his 
brother forty pounds, at their several ages of one and twenty years, and to 
Fdpha Elliott, one of my now wife's daughters, forty pounds, to Lidia 
Elliot her sister forty pounds, to Hester Elliot forty pounds and to Mary 
Elliot forty pounds, at their several ages of one and twenty years or days 
of marriage &c, and also should pay or cause to be paid all and singular 
such legacies, gifts or bequests as Philip Elliot, former husband of my said 
now wife, in and by his last will and testament hath given or bequeathed 
to any person or persons whatsoever or wherewith my said wife should or 
might be rightfully charged as Executrix of the said Philip &c. &c. My 
said wife to be my sole and only executrix; and as concerning several 
debts (specified) and all actions touching or concerning the same I make 
and ordain John Lewis of Munden, yeoman, my brother, my only executor. 

Harte, 32. 

Dame Benett, widow of Sir William Webb sometime mayor and alderman 
of London, 14 January 1602, with a codicil bearing date 30 June 1604, 
proved 9 July 1 604. To be buried in St. Dunstau's in the East near late 
husband. To my grandchild William Webb at one and twenty. The com- 
panies of Salters and Ironmongers. The poor children in Christ's Hospital. 
St. Thomas Hospital, Southwark, St. Bartholomews. The Hospital called 
Bethelem ah Bedlem w th out Bishopsgate Street, London. Bridewell, New- 
gate, Ludgate and the two " Compters." viz', that in the Poultry and that 
iu Wood Street. The Marshallsea and the White Lyon in .Southwark. 
Children of cousin Meade the wife of Edward Meade. Edward Meade the 
son. My godson Laurence Greene son of Laurence Greene of Walbrooke. 
Every other of his children. My cousin Humfrey Bigges and John Bigges 
his son. My cousin Robert Smithwicke the younger and his children. My 
god daughters Benett Brickett, Benett Holt and Benett Wright. Johane 
Meade wife of Edward Meade. Richard Bye the Grecian. My cousin 
Francis Swifte, the wife of Richard Swyfte of Essex, and her eldest daugh- 
ter. Robert Bye of Watling Street that was decayed. The eldest son of 
my cousin Edward Gaffion. The children of my cousin Bowles. The 
poor of Abbotts Laugley where my own dwelling house standeth. Every 
the children male of Thomas Greene my cousin upon London Bridge. 
Every of the children of my cousin Gyles of Bosworthe which he had by his 
first wife. Every of the children of my cousin Elizabeth Gyles now wife 
unto my cousin Bouswell. Sence Glover the daughter of Thomas Glover 
at dav of her marriage. Her sisters. 

Item I give to my cousin Elliotte's children forty shillings apiece. My 
cousin Bartholomew Wormell the elder and his son Bartholomew. The 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 901 

children of John Wormell. The daughter of Edward Daniell at her day 
of marriage. My cousin Sterrell of the Temple. My cousin Christofer 
CIvtherowe. Every of the children of my cousin Richard Swifte of Essex. 
Uncle Lawrence Greene's youngest son Thomas. Eliz: the grand child of 
my brother Gardiner. The father and mother of the said Elizabeth. John 
Billingsley sou of Sir Henry Biliingslie, which John was begotten of the 
body of Katherine his late wife. The wives of my cousin Russell and my 
cousin Gamon. My cousin Clitherowe of Watford's daughter Dorothy 
Clitherowe. Cousin Thomas Clitherowe of Watford. My cousin Wood- 
cock's children (sister to my cousin Scales). My aunt Tomlynsou. My 
cousin Lawrence Greene's wife Margaret. Benjamin Clytherowe son of 
Thomas Clytherowe of Langley. Sara Bigges wife of Ilumfrey Bigges. 
Mr. Dr. Ashbold. Mrs Cooper, Mrs Ashbold's sister. Uncle Robert Greene 
and William Scales, his son in law. Richard Syfnes my godson at sixteen and 
every other of the children of my cousin Anne Symes which were living at 
the death of Sir William Webb my late husband. My cousin Alice Reeve, 
daughter of John Webbe that dwelt at Reading. The two daughters of 
William Hawley which he had by Bennett his wife. My cousin Holdford. 
Christofer Webb the younger son of Roger Webb. Ro^er Webb the son 
of John Webb the elder who died in Reading. The children of Clement 
Draper. Legacies given to them by the will of Elizabeth Robinson late 
of St. Dunstan's in the East unto whom I was executrix. Thomas and 
Robert children of John Draper. My sister Billingsley. Cousin Margaret 
wife of William Scales. Elizabeth Bartlett and John Bartlett her son. 
My cousin Thomas Chauncye als Gyles. The children of William Bowles 
my cousin that were living at the time of the death of my late husband. The 
children of my cousin Holt so living &c. William Lavvde my sister Lawde's 
son. Elizabeth Badger the grandchild of my brother Gardiner. My cou- 
sin Robert, second son of John Draper. Mr. Thomas Thomlinson citizen and 
skinner. The children of cousin John Wright of Wrightsbrid^e in Essex. 
Dixy Clitherowe second son of Thomas Clitherowe of Abbott's Langley, 
Herts. Anne Offley daughter of my cousin Cletherowe. Cousin Benjamin 
Ibgrave and his brother William Ibgrave. Cousin Tomasine Brewster. 
Cousin Rowland SlefFord. Robert Mott, bellfounder, to cast a bell for St. 
Marys Reading. Ilarte, G7. 

John Conyers of London Esq., 6 July 1600, proved 25 January 1G04. 
I will that my body shall be buried in the vault where my wife is buried. 
To forty of the most poorest and most neediest men dwelling within the 
parish of St. Bottolphes without Aldersgate, every one of them a gown. 
To my Lady Allet and Mistress Sotherton, either of them one ring. To 
Mr. l>aron Sotherton, who hath " shewed" me many courtesies and kindnesses, 
twenty angels. To my sister Pyme, my daughter Conyers, my son Cholme- 
ley and his wife, my son Sotherton and his daughter, ray son Williams and 
his wife, my niece Palmer, my sister Conyers, my nephew Audleby and his 
wife, my nephew Smith and his wife, my late trusty servant Francis Gostou 
and Francis Shawe and his wife, every one of them, a gown of cloth. To 
my poor niece Audleby four pounds a year, for life, to be paid out of the 
manor of Walesby in the Co. of Lincoln. My grandchild Katherine 
Cholmeley and her son. My daughter in law and her three daughters. 
My brother Edward Conyers' children. Raph Conyers and his two sisters, 
Smith and Symons. My son Williams' children. My niece Palmer's chil- 
dren. 



902 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Item, I do give unto my grandchild Katheriue Ellyot, whose mother 
and she were always kindly towards me, ten pounds, and to her son five 
pounds. To my son Williams ten pounds. To my grandchild Katherine 
Conyers her grandmother's chain. I do give for the i lending of the high- 
ways in Bedfordshire one hundred pounds, according to the Lady Gas- 
coigne's will, so as my son may quietly enjoy her lands in Y' rkshire without 
any more suit or trouhle. 

" And where there hath bin a mocon made for bringing of Cundith water 
out of the fieldes by pipes of leade to a Cundith to be made in Aldersgate 
streete 1 doe by this my will giue one hundreth pounde when the worke 
shall be begou and finished: soe as it be doen within seaven yeares nexte 
after my decease, whereof I would haue my sonne carefull for the ^forming 
thereof." To my son Sotherton unto whom I have "bin behoulding manie 
waies" twenty pounds and I do make him supervisor of this my will praying 
him to be aiding and assisting unto my son whom I do make my executor. 
My brother Edward Conyers' two daughters. My poor niece Audleby's 
children. 

The above will was proved by the oath of Thomas Conyers, son and 
executor. Hayes, 3. 

Austin Elliott, of "Waltham Abbey, Essex, gen 1 ., 20 October ] 60o. 
My body to be buried in the parish church or churchyard of Widford. To 
my son Rowland Elliott four score and four pounds, to be paid unto the said 
Rowland or his assigns by John Haines of Curricott, Herts., gen 4 ., within six 
months next after the decease of George Elliott my father, of Widford in 
the aforesaid County of Hertford, gen'. To my daughter Anne Elliott, 
fourscore pounds (to be paid by John Haines at same time as above). To 
my daughters Mary Elliott and Martha Elliott (the like sum each, payable 
in like manner and form). To my sister Anne Elliott two black bullocks. 
To my aforesaid daughter Martha a red bullock with a white face. To my 
brother in law Edward Hale of Cheshunt one brown cow. To the poor of 
Widford twenty shillings, to be distributed to them within two months next 
after my decease. To my brother Edward Elliott twenty shillings. And 
I will that there shall so much of my household stuff and cattle to be sold 
as shall fully discharge and pay my debts and my funerals and proving of 
this my last will and all other charges whatsoever my executor shall lay 
out and expend about the same; and if there be any remainder of mv said 
household stuff that then the same shall be equally divided amongst mv 
saiil three daughters. And all the rest of my goods in this my last will 
not bequeathed I wholly give to my executor, whom I appoint to be my 
brother Edward Elliott; and I likewise appoint my beloved friend Mr John 
Payton, parson of Widford to lie overseer. 

One of the witnesses was George Elliott. 

On the 11"' day of November 1605, before Dr. Ridley the Commissary, 
personally appeared Edward Elliotte, the executor appointed in the will, 
and expressly renounced the burden of executorship. Commission there- 
upon issued to Anne Elliott, natural and lawful daughter of the deceased, 
by reason of such renunciation, to administer the goods according to the 
tenor of the will. 

Register -20 Com. C of London (1603-1607) fo. I'll. 

John- Eliott. G November 1606, proved 3 February 1606. My body 

to be buried in the churchyard of All Saints. I do give unto Michaell my 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 903 

eldest son one house where mv grandmother Katherine Bearman (?) dwel- 
leth. I give him also six acres of ground, more or less, lying in the field 
called Parke Croftes in the parish of Ilunsdon. To my youngest son John 
one tenement called little Winslowe, with a barn thereunto belonging, now 
iu the tenure and occupation of one William Handcocke. I give him also 
one half acre of meadow in Ilunsdon meade, between the meadows of Sir 
Thomas Foster, knight, abutting upon the river. My will is that, after my 
grandmother's decease, my sister Bridget Harrison shall have all the above 
named tenements, with the lauds and meadow, paying the yearly rent of 
five pounds a year after her entrance into the said tenements, to have the 
said houses and tenements until such time as my son Michael cometh to 
one and twenty years, if my sister live so long, keeping all the said tene- 
ments in good reparations. Sundry gifts of linen &c. to sons Michael and 
John. Certain household stuff to daughter Elizabeth, also the best gown 
being colour London brown laid with billament lace, one petticoat of Stam- 
mell laid with three billament laces of velvet. My father in law Michael 
Ireland shall be my sole executor to take up my debts and pay my debts 
and to see my body honestly buried. Hudleston, 20. 

Roger Elliot of the hamlet of Upshere in the parish of Waltham Holy 
Cross, Essex, yeoman, 31 March 1608, proved 12 April 1608. To wife 
Katherine four pounds yearly, to be paid unto her out of my lands during 
the time of her widowhood at the usual feasts of the year, viz* the feast of 
St. Michael the Archangel and the Annunciation of our Lady St. Mary the 
Virgin by equal and even portions. All the rest of my moveable goods &c. 
I give unto Katherine my wife whom I make full and whole executrix &c. 

Register 21 Com. of Loudon (1607-1611), fo. 31. 

Memorandum that George Elyot of St. Margarets in Lothbury, Lon- 
don, upon the second day of September A.D. 1611, being sick in body but 
of perfect mind and memory, made and declared his last will and testament 
nuncupative &c. He gave to his brother Edward Elyott four acres of 
arable land in the parish of "Weston, Herts, which said land is holden of 
the manor of Argentines. And he did give and bequeath to his said brother 
Edward forty shillings which his brother Thomas Elyott owed him, and all 
the rest of his goods, chatties and debts whatsoever. And he did make, 
constitute and appoint his said brother Edward his sole executor &c. in the 
presence and hearing of Raphe Houghe, Dorothie Wilkinson and Margaret 
Jenkins. Fenner, 8. 

John Eliote of Weston, Herts., yeoman, 9 September 1612, proved 
19 February 1612. My body to be buried in the churchyard of Weston. 
I devise and bequeath the custody, government and education of my two 
daughters unto Elizabeth my loving wife until their several ages of sixteen 
years. To the said Elizabeth my wife all my freehold messuages, lands, 
tenements and hereditaments &c. in Weston or elsewhere, to hold the 
moiety or half of said messuages &c. during the nonage or minority of 
Amies my eldest daughter, and until the said Annes shall accomplish the 
full age of one and twenty years, for and towards her education, maintenance 
and preferment, the remainder of the said moiety to the said Annes and 
the heirs of her body lawfully begotten, and for default of issue, the remain- 
der to Elizaheth my younger daughter <&c. and next to my said wife and 
her heirs forever. The other moiety to be held for the younger daughter 



904 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Elizabeth (in the same mauner &c). To the poor of Weston twenty shil- 
lings. The residue to wife Elizabeth whom I appoint sole executrix. 

Capell, 15. 

Hewgh Eylleot of Waltham Holy Cross Essex, yeoman, 2 June 
1613, proved 16 June 1613. To be buried in the parish churchyard of 
Waltham. To Thomas Parnell of Widford a parcel of land called Stocke- 
ing, with a hedge grove thereunto belonging, containing by estimation five 
acres &c. now in the tenure and occupation of the said Thomas Parnell, 
for the term of twelve years, in lieu and recompence of a debt that I owe 
unto him. I give all my lands and tenement, both free and copyhold, in 
Widford to John Wood als Lyllye of Widford on condition he pay all 
legacies, gifts, debts &c. To my father's sister's children fifty pounds. To 
my cousin Ferdenando Eylleot of Epping twenty pounds. To Edward 
Eylleot of Widford ten pounds. To Edward Noone five pounds. To the 
poor of Waltham Holy Cross twenty shillings. To the poor of Widford 
forty shillings. And I appoint, ordain and make Edward Eilleott and Johu 
Wood als Lyllye executors &c. and Thomas Parnell and Ferdenandoe 
Eylleot overseers. 

Register 22 Com. C'. of London (1611-1616) fo. 173. 

Nicholas Elliott als Aylett of Albury, Herts., brickmaker, 18 
February 1617, proved 2 May 1618. " Being at this present aged and 
sick." To the poor of Albury ten shillings, to be distributed amongst them 
at my burial. To Elizabeth, my daughter, wife of Rowland Field; ten 
pounds. To the five children of my said daughter Elizabeth six pounds. 
To Francis Elliott son of my late son Richard Elliott twenty pounds on 
the feast day of St. Michael the Archangel which shall be in the year of 
Our Lord God one thousand six hundred twenty and five, at or in the 
church porch of Albury aforesaid. To my son William Elliott and to his 
wife and to the longer liver of them, for term of their natural lives, all my 
pasture and wood ground called parish grove, containing by estimation 
twelve acres more or less, and after their decease to Nicholas and William, 
sons of said William Ellyott &c, in consideration that the legacies given in 
my will shall be paid and that thirty pounds shall be paid to my daughter 
Ann or to her husband according to a certain covenant and agreement here- 
tofore by me made &c. To Mary Elliott, daughter of my late son Richard 
Elliott, forty shillings in six years &c. To my daughter Feild and my son 
William Ellyott all my household stuff within my houses to be equally 
divided amongst them by four indifferent men'. To my daughter Feild one 
cow. To my son William all my freehold land lying in Chisdell als Chisley 
field, containing eight acres more or less, with "y e kell " barn and other 
houses to it belonging. The residue to William my sou, he paying my debts, 
legacies and funeral charges. And I make him my only executor. 

Register D. Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, fo. 143. 

Bennett Elliott of Nasinge, Essex, yeoman, 5 November 1621, 
proved 28 March 1622. My body to buried in decent and Christian man- 
ner. I give and bequeath all the rents and profits of all my copy and 
customary lands and tenements &c. in the several parishes of Ware, Wid- 
ford, Hunsdon and Estweeke in the Co. of " Harford" unto my trusty and 
well beloved friends William Curtis, my son in law, Nicholas Camp the 
younger and John Keyes, all of the said parish of Nasinge, for the space of 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 905 

eight years from the time of my decease quarterly to pay unto my son John 
Elliott the sum of eight pouuds a year of lawful money of England for and 
towards his maintenance in the University of Cambridge, where he is now 
scholar, and the residue of the rents and profits I give and bequeath for 
and towards the bringing up of my youngest children, that is to say, Fran- 
cis, Jacob. Mary and Lydia. And the inheritance of all my said lauds lyiug 
in the said parishes I give and bequeath as followed]. First, to Francis, 
mv youngest son, and to his heirs forever, one parcel of land called Crott- 
well Croft, containing two acres more or less, and one other parcel of land 
called Coles Croft, containing one acre more or less, and one parcel of land 
called Dameter in Great Hyfield and one other parcel of land lying in Little 
Westney, by estimation one acre and a half more or less, and one parcel of 
land lying in Sowters Common Meade, containing half an acre, with all the 
rents and profits after the end of the said eight years have expired ; and I give 
and bequeath unto my sou Jacob and to his heirs forever all that my messuage 
or tenement in the said parish of Widford, with all the lands thereunto belong- 
ing lying in the said several parishes of Widford, Ware, Hunsdon, and Estwick, 
with all other the appurtenances other than those lands before given to my 
son Francis, with all the rents and profits of the same from aud after the 
said eight years. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Lydia the sum of 
fifty pounds of lawful mouey, to be paid unto her at the age of eighteen years 
or day of marriage, which shall first happen. I give uuto my daughter 
Mary the sum of twenty pounds of like lawful mouey, to be paid unto her 
in like manner and I give unto ray goddaughter Mary Curtis the sum of 
three pounds of like money, payable to her as to the others; and my will 
and mind is that if either of my said two daughters die before their said age or 
marriage that then the survivor to have her part or legacy as aforesaid aud 
that if they both happen to die before the said time that then the sum of 
forty pounds thereof be paid to my son John and the residue to and 
amongst my younger children. 

Item, my will and mind is that so soon as may be after my decease my 
executors make sale of all my stock of cattle, corn and all other goods and 
chatties that be " a broade " out of my house and of so much of my move- 
able goods within the house as in their discretions cannot well be kept in 
their own property till my said children be of age to use the same, to such 
persons as will give most money for the same, and the money rising thereof 
to employ for the use, behoof and maintenance of my said children to the 
best advantage they lawfully may or can; and further my will and mind is 
that my daughter Mary and my daughter Lidia shall have the chest in the 
yellow chamber and all that is in the same, over and above their parts in 
the rest of my goods, and my will and mind is that my sou Phillip shall 
have so much of my household implements as cannot well be removed with- 
out loss, for his part of my said goods if it rise to be so much; if his part 
come not to the value then that he may have them at a reasonable price if 
he will before any other; and I give unto my son Francis four silver spoons 
which were given him at his Christening, over and above his my part of 
goods, and my will is that my daughter Mary Curtis have the keeping of 
them till he be of age, aud for that my said daughter Mary Curtis hath 
heretofore had a good and competent part of my goods for her portion and 
preferment in marriage, whereby she is already provided for, I give unto 
her only the sum of five shillings to make her a small ring to wear in re- 
membrance of my love to her and because my estate in goods and chatties 
will hardly be sufficient for the education of my young childreu, Francis, 



906 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Jacob, Mary and Lydia therefore I more give unto my said friends William 
Curtis, Nicholas Camp and John Keyes, whom I trust for their bringing 
up, the sum of ten pounds a year yearly for the space of eighteen years 
after my decease out of my messuage and customary lands in the parish of 
Nasinge, or out of any part thereof, for the better maintenance of my said 
children; and the inheritance of my 'said messuage, lands and tenements 
with their appurtenances, with all the rents and profits thereof other than 
the said ten pounds a year out of the same for the time aforesaid, I give 
and bequeath unto my son Phillip Elliott and to his heirs forever; and my 
will and mind is that my said friends pay all such fine or fines as shall be 
due to the lord or lords for their said lands when they shall be thereunto 
admitted, and the rest of my estate in goods, rents, money, debts or chat- 
tels, with the profits thereof if any be, to deliver to my said children by 
even and equal portions at the end and expiration of the said eighteen 
years; and for that cause I do hereby ordain and appoint my said beloved 
friends William Curtis, Nicholas Campe the younger and John Keyes my 
full and sole executors &c. and I give to either of them for their pains 
herein taken forty shillings apiece, and my earnest request is that Mr John 
Tey of the said parish of Nasinge Esq. would be aiding and helping to my 
said executors by his good counsel and advice for the better execution 
thereof, and my will and mind is that if any question or doubt do arise 
between my executors concerning this my said will that they submit them- 
selves to be ordered and ruled by him without any further trouble or con- 
tention. 

Wit: Robert Wonnam, Parnell Borum, John Tey, John Campe, William 
Curtis. 

Proved by the oaths of William Curtis, Nicholas Camp junior and John 
Keyes, executors &c. 

Register 24 Com. C l . of London (1621-1626) fo. 85. 

James Eliot of Rayleigh, Essex, clerk, 19 May 1623, proved 14 July 
1623. To the poor of Rayleigh forty shillings. To Anne Howlet, my 
maidservant, three pounds in two years. To Judith Eliott, my daughter 
the advowson donative and presentation of the rectory and parsonage of 
Rayleigh, and I appoint Edward Hetham of Hunsdon, my brother in law, 
to be her guardian. To my daughters Susanna and Mary my tenement 
wherein Stephen Couch dwelleth, with all the land thereunto belonging, 
lying and being within the parishes of Hockley and Rayleigh. To my 
daughter Susanna Eliott the house wherein Mr. Rawlins sometime dwelled, 
with the meadow on the backside and all tenements next adjoining to 
the said mansion house &c To Mary Eliott, my daughter, those four 
houses wherein Robert Man, Richard Merrifall, John Sutton and Richard 
Wood now dwelleth, together with the land called Sandpit Corner now in 
my own occupation. All my first wife's apparell and wearing things to he 
divided equally amongst my three daughters. To my son Phillipp Eliott 
the remainder of my lease called Olives in Hunsdon. To my son James 
Eliott the land called Ilowletts and Barringtons Meade and Tarrpott 
which I purchased of Serg'. Athow and his son, to have the same at his 
age of one and twenty years. To James, my son, that part of the house 
wherein Henry Barnes now dwelleth and the land he occupieth, together 
with Coggers Acre, to enter upon at the age of one and twenty. To Eliza- 
beth my wife the messuage called the George, with the hinds belonging, 
now in the possession of Henry Broadwater (and other lands), also the 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IX ENGLAND. 007 

house called BarringtOD wherein I now dwell, with the orchard &c. After 
her decease Philip to have the George &c. and James to have Barrington. 
My wife to have the rent of my children's lands till they are seventeen or 
married, and to well educate and bring them up; and further my mind and 
will is that my two sons James and Philip should be brought up in learning 
both in the Grammar School and also in the University, and this trust I 
commit unto my said wife. If my wife depart before the children come to 
their ages aforesaid then I will my daughter Judith, if she be married, shall 
take the care upon her for her brethren and sisters, and if she die &c. then 
my brother in law Edward Iietham and Effe his wife. The rest to my 
wife whom I appoint sole executrix and I do appoint Mr Symme and Mr 
John Wilson overseers. 

Bellamy (Cousistory C l . of London) fo. 121. 

John Campe the elder of Nasing Essex, yeoman, '21 May 1630, proved 
11 June 1030. To my son John three pounds at the decease of Mary my 
wife or within a month after her decease. To my son George four pounds 
within four years after my decease. To my sou Nicholas three pounds 
within six months &c. To my son Thomas eight pounds at his age of one 
and twenty. To my daughter Mary five pounds in six years &c. To my 
daughter Sarah three pounds in three years &c. To my grandchild Eliza- 
beth Campe three pounds at one and twenty. To my grandchild John 
Campe twenty shillings at eighteen. 

Item I give to John Elott my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid unto 
her (sic) at his age of eighteen years. The rest I leave to Mary my wife 
whom I make my full and sole executrix. And I desire my good friends 
Richard Campe and William Campe to be overseers, they to have twelve 
pence apiece for their pains to be taken. 

Register 26, Com. CK of London (1629-1634) fo. 42. 

[I venture to send the foregoing Eliott notes, even though it is an incomplete 
collection, and my researches have not been exhaustive. They relate, as will be 
easily seen, chiefly to the family of which a pedigree is given in the Visitations 
of Essex, published by the Harleian Society, forit is to that family that, I feel 
convincsd, our beloved Apostle to the Indians belonged, and I hope that some day 
it will be our good fortune to see this fully and clearly proved. In the mean time 
it may be as w r ell to put in print and so save for future use these notes, as well 
as some extracts from parish registers, which a descendant of the holy man 
has succeeded in obtaining. These notes and extracts show plainly how closely 
connected the family of the Apostle were with the places with which the family 
w T hose pedigree is given were also connected. One fortunate discovery in the 
shape of a will may settle the whole matter for us. Let us hope such good 
fortune will come to us. 

It may be well to refer to some of the points given us in some of these wills. 
That of Thomas Grene of Stanford Rivers (1534-1537), for instance, shows 
that he was connected also with "Cotred" in Herts. And he seems to have 
been a proprietor of the manor of Belhouse. in Stanford Rivers. His wife 
Elizabeth seems also to have been the widow of an Eliott. Now, if we examine 
the pedigree of Wilson of Willion as given in the Visitation of Herts (pub. by 
the llarl. Soc), page 121, we shall find there that Thomas Wilson of " Codreth," 
Herts, had (among other children) a daughter .... wife to .... Greene and 
after to ... . Eliott of Stanford Rivers, another daughter Alice wife to Con- 
niswell, a son Rafe and a son Edward. Thomas Grene in his will speaks of 
"William Cammeswcll which married my wife's suster." This was doubtless 
that " Alice wife to Conniswell." And Cammeswcll is probably the true read- 
ing. Again, Grene speaks of " lands in Cotred that I bought of Raufe Wilson." 
This Raufe Wilson was doubtless the Rafe Wilson of the pedigree, one of the 
brothers of Alice " Conniswell," and of Mrs. Greene als. EliottT Now examine 
the pedigree of Eliott in the Visitation of Essex and we find that Thomas 



908 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Eliott of Cottered, Herts, the common ancestor of those embraced in the pedi- 
grees of Eliott, married .... daughter of Thomas Wilson of Cottered, Herts, 
gent'., a sister of Edward Wilson. Undoubtedly it was she who afterwards 
became the wife of Thomas Grene of Stanford Kivers. So it appears that 
we can correct the pedigree of Wilson by changing the order of marriage of 
that daughter of Thomas Wilson with her respective husbands and giving them 
all baptismal names. She was Elizabeth Wilson, and was wife to Thomas Eliott 
and after to Thomas Greene. 

George Ellyot of Stertford (Bishops Stortford) Herts, Esq., whose will (1548- 
1554) I give, was, without doubt, one of the sons of that Thomas Eliott by 
Elizabeth Wilson. He mentions an eldest brother John, a yoimgest brother 
John, a brother Robert, a brother Thomas and a sister Johan Heynes. His own 
children were evidently Magnus Eliott, George Eliott and Katherine, wife of . . . 
Sparoke, or Sparke. And he brings into the line of succession of his landed 
estate, after decease of his children, and failing their male issue, John Eliott of 
London, mercer, and Henry Eliott of Lanocke (probably an estate near Hit- 
chin) . These two I believe to have been sons, the one of that eldest brother 
John and the other of that youngest brother John mentioned in the will. The 
printed pedigree shows the one but not the other. In fact, incomplete, like so 
many Visitation pedigrees, it does not give that youngest brother John Eliott at 
all ; and it was from this younger John or his brother Thomas that I suspect 
our John Eliott of Roxbury was descended. Finally the testator describes his 
brother Robert Eliott as of Hunsdon, and the will is witnessed by John Eliott of 
Wickham Hall, John Eliott of London, Richard Fletcher, curate, and Richard 
Pilston. John Eliott of Wickham Hall was the eldest brother John of the will 
and father of John Eliott of London. Richard Pilston was nephew of the 
testator by marriage with Winifred, one of the half sisters of John Eliott of 
London. 

Now we come to the will of Thomas Elyot of Wydford (1551-1554) whom I 
believe to have been the brother Thomas mentioned in the preceding will. He 
mentions sons Thomas, John and Simon, and speaks of lands in Widford and 
Ware, names of places very significant when we come, later on, to read the will 
of the father of our John Eliott. Let us also recall that his brother George 
owned a house occupied by Simon Eliott (this probably in Little Hadham). 

Next I furnish will of John Haynes of Much Hadham (1551 — ?). He 
mentions (among others) wife Joanne (perhaps the sister of George Eliott), 
son George, daughter Agnes, late the wife of John Grave, and daughter Cathe- 
rine wife of Simon Eliott. Following this is the will of George Haynes of 
Much Hadham (1584) who was perhaps the son of the preceding testator and 
possibly husband, by a first match, of Blythe a daughter of John Eliott of 
Wickham Hall. These two wills are also interesting to us as relating to the 
family of our Governor Haynes, of Massachusetts and Connecticut, who was 
the son Of John Haynes of Coddicut Herts and Old Holt Essex (buried at Much 
Hadham Herts), who was perhaps the son of this very George Haynes whose 
will I give. It is well also to note that John Haynes in his will (1551) provides 
for two "Sarmondes" to be preached at Widford. 

Next comes the will of Thomas Ellyott of London (1557)- who makes a be- 
quest to the church at Widford, and by his mention of his " uucle John Ellyott 
of Stratford " (Stortford), Herts, and John Elliott, his son, of London, mercer, 
binds himself to this family. By naming his father and mother, John and Johan 
Ellyott, then living in Widford, he enables us to place him exactly. His father 
was John Elliott, that youngest brother mentioned in will of George Eliott 
already given. And now we have two of the sons of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Wilson) Eliott, of the pedigree, placed in Widford, a place so important in the 
history of our Indian Apostle, since it was there he was born and baptized. It 
will be noted that we have found also the probable parentage of Henry Eliott', 
named in George Eliott's will, for this Thomas mentions a brother Henry. 
Besides this Henry there is an eldest brother of the testator, named John, 
whose son John Eliott comes just in the -line of entail of the testator's landed 
estate in Widford. And one, or both, of them seems to have been then living 
in Waltlum, Essex (quite near Nasing). Unfortunately the testator did not 
name his other nephews and nieces. 

Following the above comes the will of John Elyott of Stortford parsonage, 
evidently the eldest brother John of George Eliott's will and certainly the John 
Eliott of the pedigree, father (among others) of John of London and Edward 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 909 

of Newland, father also of Blythe Haynes and of Winifred the wife of Richard 
Pilston. already referred to. Besides these he names sons George and Rowland 
and daughters Tabett (/rabitha) , Alice and Agnes, the last named wife of another 
Pilston. 

Edward Eliott of Newland, Essex, Esq., whose will (1595-1506) is nest given, 
is the one on whose account the pedigree was given in the Visitation of 
Essex. It was through his wife Jane, a daughter and co-heir of James Gedge, 
that he became connected with Newland. The printed pedigree is very defec- 
tive in regard to his family. He names sons Thomas (afterwards knighted), 
Edward and John, daughters Hannati, Jane and Elizabeth, and a daughter Colleu. 
This last mntioned daughter, I have found, was Dorothy, wife, probably, of 
John Collen. Hannah became the wife of John Pinchon (see my notes on the 
Pinchon familv), Jane was probably married to John Butler, and Elizabeth was 
the wife of John Yonge of Roxwell. Besides these I am confident we must 
give him Mary, married, first to Edward Bogas of Ardley Essex, gen'., and 
secondly to Mr. Matthew Davis, clerk, vicar of Writtle. (See Marriage 
Licenses, Bishop of London, Edward Boosy and Jane Bogas, and the will of 
Dorothv Davis printed among my Pinchon notes.) Mr. Matthew Davis in his 
will (1616-1625) mentions wife 'Mary, son John, daughter Dorothy, and also 
refers to his wife's children which she had by Mr. Bogas. (P. C C. Clarke 46.) 
Of course there is the chance that when Dorothy Davies referred to Mrs. Mary 
Davies as mother she meant stepmother. At any rate there can be little ques- 
tion that Dorothv herself was a granddaughter of Edward Eliott of Newland, 
since she names ( 1634) her uncle Sir Thomas Eliott, her uncle John Eliott, his wife 
Anne and children Edward, Anne, Mary and Susan, her uncle ar.d aunt John and 
Hannah Pinchon, and her aunt Elizabeth Young, widow. It is well to note also 
that when Edward Eliott of Newland was making his will his brother George 
was then living (having three sons) and a sister Pulisden (Puleston or Pilston). 
The testator's sou Edward died in 1602, without issue, as we can gather from 
the Admon. granted to his sisters Dorothy Collen and Hannah Pinchon. 

The next will (that of Robert Morley) refers to the alliance of Thomas Eliott 
of Belhouse in Stanford Rivers, Essex, with Catherine daughter of Nowell 
Sotherton, one of the Barons of the Exchequer, in connection with which see 
the Sotherton pedigree in the Visitation of London, a.d. 1568. 

John Mvllett of Hunsdon, whose will (1603-1604) follows next, married 
Katherine "Eliott of Hunsdon, widow of Philip Eliott. License was granted 
25 January 1593, he being then styled of London. It was James Eliott, son of 
Philip and Catherine, who was afterwards parson of Raleigh, Essex. I have not 
come across the will of Catherine's first husband. 

Dame Benett Webb's will (1602-1603) is not quite clear. She was one of the 
daughters of Sir Christopher Draper (Mayor of London) by Margaret daughter 
of Henry Greene of Essex, and had been the wife of Sir William Webb, also 
Lord Mayor of London. I thought it worth the while, however, to save it for 
future use. 

The next will, however, that of John Conyers of London (1600-1604), places 
itself. He must have married Catherine widow of Anthony Williams, Esq., 
Auditor of the Mint (see pedigree of Williams of Abbots Langley in Visitation 
of Herts). Timothy, daughter of Anthony and Catherine Williams, was the 
wife of Noel Sotherton and mother of Catherine wife of Thomas Eliott of 
Belhouse. We are thus enabled to correct and amend both the Visitation of 
London (1568) and the Visitation of Herts. The former does not give the 
parentage of Timothy Sotherton, while the latter wrongly states that her mother, 
Catherine, was the widow of John Conyers, the fact being evident that she must 
have been married to Williams first and Conyers afterwards, as shown clearly 
by this will of her second husband, who outlived her. At least I do not now see 
any other wav of explaining it. 

The will of Austin Elliott of Waltham Abbey (1605) refers to his father 
George Eliott as apparently then alive. I would suggest that this George Eliott 
was one of the two brothers (by the whole blood) of Edward Eliott of New- 
land, the other being Rowland Eliott, after whom probably this Austin Eliott 
named his son. If I am correct in my theory of his relationship to the Eliotts 
of Stortford and Newland this will becomes important as showing another line 
of this Visitation family living in Widford, since the testator directs his body 
to be buried there, and speaks of his father as living there. Austin and Edward 



910 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IX ENGLAND. 

Eliott (mentioned in this will * were probably two of the three sons of George 
Eliott referred to by Edward Eliott of Newlancl in 1595. 

John Eliott, whose will (160G) follows, I do not undertake to place definitely. 
I would simply call attention to his ownership of lands in Hunsdon. Nor will 
I attempt to place Roger Eliott of Waltham Holy Cross, whose will (1G08), or 
George Eliott of London, whose will (1611) connects him with Weston Herts; 
or, again, John Eliote of Weston, whose will (1G12) follows. But a pedigree 
of the first named (John Eliott of Hunsdon, a.d. 1G06) appears in the Visita- 
tion of London a.t>. 1G34 (Harl. Soc.) p. 252. 

Hugh Eliott of Waltham Holy Cross, whose will (1613) follows, owned lauds 
in Widford, and named a cousin Ferdinando Eliott of Eppiug (also named in the 
will of John Myllett as an innholder) and an Edward Eliott of Widford, who 
may have b en a son of George and brother of Austin Eliott, already referred 
to.' 

The testator of the next will (Nicholas Elliott als Aylett) I have not at- 
tempted to place. 

Then comes the will of Bennett Elliot of Nasinge, father of our John Eliott, 
who seems to have owned lands in Widford, Ware and Hunsdon, three places 
so closely connected with the family whose wills have been passing undor our 
examination, who was also, as it appears, married in Widford, and his famous 
son born there. Can we have much doubt that he belonged to the same family, 
even though we cannot place our finger upon the exact connecting link? 

James Eliot of Raleigh Essex, clerk, whose will (1623) comes next, was 
evidently the son of Philip and Catherine Eliott and stepson of John Myllett. 

I give in addition the will of John Campe of Nasinge, showing an apparent 
connection of this family with Eliotts. Later on I may add notes taken from 
other Eliott wills. Henry F. Waters. 

The following Eliots, variously spelled, are from the Registers of the Parish 
of St. John tha Baptist, Widford, Hertfordshire, England. They are from 
extracts made by the Rev. John Traviss Lockwood, Rector of the Church there, 
in 1893 ; not in the exact language of those early clays but iu the English of the 
present time. 

Under Baptisms. 

A. D. 1582. Elizabeth, the daughter of William Eliot and his wife was chris- 
tened, February 10th. 

A. U. 1583. Amies, the daughter of Austen Eliot and Amies his wife was 
christened, Sept. 15th. 

A. D. 1587. Rowland, the son of Austen Eliot and Anues his wife was chris- 
tened, the 19th of Feb. 

A. D. 1593. Joseph Eliot, the son of Edward Eliot and Anne his wife, was 
born the sixth of March and baptized the 15th day of the same month. 

A. D. 1599. Sarah Eliot, the daughter of Benuet Eliot and Lettes his wife, 
was baptized the 13th of Jan. 

Adjoining this entry is this note : Sarah Elliott was the first child baptized 
in Widford by Mr. John Payton, parson of Widford. 

(This Sarah Eliot was married to William Curtis, one of the early settlers of 
Roxbury, Mass.— e. e.) 

A. D.1602. Phillip Elliott, son of Bennet Elliott was baptized the 25th day 
of April. 

A. D. 1604. John Elliott, the son of Bennett Elliott was baptized the fifth 
day of August in the year of our Lord God 1G04. 

(lie became famous as " The Apostle to the Indians." 

The Rev. Mr. Lockwood has appended the following note : " The entry here 
copied is, fortunately, one; of the few in the old Registers of Widford Parish 
which remakis clear and distinct after the lapse of 289 years." — E. E.) 

A. D. 1G06. Jacob Elliott, the son of Bennett Elliott, was baptized the 21st 
(lav of Sept. 

A. D. 1G10. Sarah Elyott, the daughter of Mr. Edward Elyott was baptized 
the 18th dav of Nov. 

A. D. 1613. John Elyott, son of Mr. Edward Elyott was baptized the 29th 
day of Aug. 

A. D. 1G85. Philip, son of Philip and Elizabeth Elliot, baptized Oct. 29th. 

A. 1). 1687. Elizabeth, daughter of Philip and Elizab. Elliott, bap. Oct. 12th. 









GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1)11 

Under Marriag< s. 
A. D. 1582. Austen Eliot and Amies Hale were married the 14th day of June. 
A. D. 1598. Bonnet Eliot and Lcttese Aggar were married the 30th of Oct. 

(Those were the parents of " The Apostle to the Indians." — E. e.) 
A. D. 1634. George Elliott of Iluusdon and Mary Savage of Much Iladham, 
single woman, servant to Mathew Cockett of Hadham, were married the 9th 
of Feb. 

A. D. 1628. William Darter of Ilunsdou, husbandman & Judith Elliott of 
Hunsdon, daughter of Edward Elliott of Hunsdon were married the 10th of Oct. 

Under Burials. 

A. D. 1563. Joane Eliot, the wife of John Eliot was buried the 16th day of 
July. 

A. D. 1565. George Eliot the son of Thomas Eliot was buried the 26th of 
Sept. 

A. D. 15G8. Johu Eliott senior was buried the 6th [?] day of March. 

A. D. 1578. Catherine the wife of Eliot was buried the 19th of Aug. 

A. D. 1582. Henry Eliot was buried the 20th of December. 

A. D. 1583. Anues Eliot the daughter of Austeu Eliot & Annes his wife was 
buried the 15th day of Feb. 

A. D. 1585. John Eliot was buried the 15th day of Jan. 

A. D. 1605. Austen Elliott gentleman was buried the 24th day of Oct. 

A. D. 1G07. Anne Elliott, daughter of Austeu Ellyott gentleman was buried 
the twelvth day of December. 

Mr. Lockwood writes that the word " gentleman " was a designation to dis- 
tinguish one who was a landed proprietor, or lived independently. Then the 
distinction was uot usually applied to professional men or wealthy tradesmen, 
as that of "Esq." is so commonly applied now. — Ellsworth Eliot, M.D., 
of New York City. 

Extracts relating to the name of Eliot from the parish registers of Nazeing 
and Roxwell iu Essex, and Cheshunt and Hunsdon in Hertfordshire, are printed 
in Mr. William Winters's article on the " Eliot Family " in the Register, vol. 39, 
pp. 365-371, and need not be re-printed here. See also " The Pilgrims of Nam- 
ing, " by the same author, in vol. 28, pp. 110-145. 

A Memorial Window to the memory of the Rev. Johu Eliot, the Apostle to 
the Indians, in the church at Widford, was dedicated with appropriate cere- 
monies, on the 21st of May last. The cost of this window was defrayed by a 
subscription among his descendants iu the United States (see Register, Vol. 
48, page 80). The rector of the church, the Rev. J. T. Lockwood, gave a 
sketch of the life of Eliot, and the United States Ambassador, the Hon. Thomas 
F. Bayard, who was present by invitation, made au address. An account of 
the proceedings was printed iu the Huston Evening Transcript, June 16tk. A 
fuller account appeared in the Herts Guardian, May 26, 1894. — Editor.] 

Piiillep Elliott of Iluusdon, Herts, yeoman 9 February 159i, proved 
at Stortford Monday G March 15'Jl. I give to the parish of Iluusdon 
twenty .shillings. 1 give to my sister Margery one cow, to be delivered 
unto her within one mouth next after my decease. I give to Ferdinando 
and Ileury, my brethren, to each of them a peusion of twenty shillings a 
year, to be paid to them out of my farm called Olives by the space of ten 
years if they so long live. I give and bequeath to William Elliot, my 
brother, forty shillings, to be paid to him within oue whole }'ear next after 
my decease. I give and bequeath to Jeffray Elliot, my brother, forty shil- 
lings, to be paid to him within two years next alter my decease. I give 
and bequeath to Epha Elliot, my daughter, forty marks, to be paid to her, 
the one half at her age of eighteen years and the other half at her age of 
tweuty one years; but if she depart this natural life before cither of the 
prefixed times of payment of her said legacy then my will and mind is that 
the one half of her portion then unpaid shall remain to Lidia my daughter. 



912 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS LN ENGLAND. 

I give to Lidia Elliot, my daughter, forty marks, to be paid to her, the one 
half at her age of eighteen years and the other half at her age of twenty 
one years; and if she depart this natural life before either of the prefixed 
times of payment of her said legacy then my will and mind is that the one 
half of her portion then unpaid shall remain to Epha my daughter and the 
other to mine executrix. I give and bequeath to Hester Elliot, my daugh- 
ter, forty marks, to be paid to her, the one half at her age of eighteen years 
and the other half at her age of twenty one years; but if she depart this 
natural life before either of the prefixed times of payment of her said 
legacy then my will and mind is that the one half of her portion then un- 
paid shall remain to Mary Elliot my daughter and the other half to mine 
executrix. I give to Mary Elliot, my daughter, forty marks, to be paid to 
her, the one half at her age of eighteen years and the other half at her age 
of twenty one years; and if she depart this natural life hefore either of the 
prefixed times of payment of her said legacy then my will and mind is that 
the one half of her portion then unpaid shall remain to Hester Elliot my 
daughter and the other to mine executrix. I give and bequeath to James 
and Daniel, my sons, to each of them five pounds, to be paid unto them at 
their several ages of eighteen years. My will and mind is that Katherine 
my wife shall have, hold and enjoy the lease of my farm called Olives, with 
all and singular the commodities thereto belonging, not making waste, until 
such time as James Elliot, my son, shall come to the age of twenty one 
years, and thenceforth the half thereof and all commodities thereto belong- 
ing during the term of her natural life and the other half of the said lease 
of the said farm, being divided with all indifferency in all and singular the 
commodities of the same, I give and bequeath to James Elliot my son, to 
have, hold and enjoy the same jointly with his said mother, at his age of 
twenty one years, yielding and paying the one half of my legacies that then 
shall remain unpaid as also the one half of the annuity payable by my 
father's will unto Jeffray my brother and five pounds, during the natural 
life of his mother unto Daniel Elliot, my sou. My will and mind is that 
after the decease of Katherine my wife, immediately, my two sons James 
and Daniel shall have and enjoy the said lease and term of years then to 
come in my said farm of Olives, with all profits and commodities thereto 
belonging, to them, their heirs, executors, administrators and assigns, equally 
between them, yielding and paying, equally between them, so many of my 
said legacies as shall be and remain unpaid at the death of the said Kath- 
erine my wife, according to the true meaning of this my last will and Testa- 
ment. All the rest of my goods and cattails, movable and unmovable, I 
give and bequeath unto the said Katherine my wife, to her maintenance and 
to the bringing up of my " childerne." And of this my last will and Testa- 
ment I make and ordain the said Katherine my wife sole executrix, to see 
my debts paid, legacies discharged and funerals performed. And I ordain 
overseers of this my last will and Testament Ferdinando Elliot, my brother, 
Thomas Wood and William Wood, my wife's brethren. 

Thomas Ituggle was one of the witnesses. 

Uncalendared will in File (1591) Com. of London (Essex and Herts). 

[This will, referred to in the will of John Myllett 1C03 (ante, p. 392), I have 
been hunting for in vain on the Calendars of the various Courts in which it might 
have been entered for probate. At last I have discovered it in a bundle of un- 
indcxed wills, as above. His baptism, marriage and burial may be found on 
the parish registers of Hunsdon (see Keg. for Oct. 1885, pp. 3GG-3(t8). His 
father's name was probably John. Henry F. Waters.] 



Thomas 


= Anna fil. 


Anna 


kloulston 


Anthonii 


ux. 


de Lon- 


Ratcliffe 


Hugonis 


don 


de Lon- 


Ken- 




don 


drick 




Alder- 


T" 




manni 





GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 913 

Dame Anne Mowlson (Register, vol. 47, p. 114; ante, p. 658): 

[At the above reference an abstract of the will of Dame Mowlson, the founder 
of the First Scholarship in Harvard College, -will be found. An abstract of the 
will of her husband, Sir Thomas Mowlson, is printed in the same volume, page 
113 (ante, p. 658), and that of her brother, Anthony Kadcliffe, in volume 48, page 
2i)6 {ante, p. 8T0). The college for young women established in connection with 
Harvard University, known as the "Annex," which was incorporated by the 
Massachusetts Legislature this year, has been named Itadcliffe College, in honor 
of Dame Mowlson, whose maiden name was Radcliffe. The researches of Mr. 
Waters published in these " Gleanings," made it almost certain that her surname 
was Radcliffe ; but as there was a chance (only a small one it is true) that she 
might have been a half sister of Anthony Radcliffe, at the suggestion of Mr. 
Andrew McFarland Davis, the editor of the Register wrote to George W. 
Marshall, LL.D., F.S.A., Rouge Croix, Herald's College, London, asking if he 
could furnish positive information on this point. This he was able to do. He 
sent the following extract from a pedigree in Vincent's London : 

Tho. Moulston* de Hargrave = Alicia filia Joli'is Aldersey de 
in Com Cestr. Spurstow. 

Rebecca filia Catharine Johannes=Anna Thomas = Anna fil. Anna Maria 

Tho. Moulston ux. William Moulston I filia Moulston Anthonii ux. uxor Joh'ie 

= Richford de Har- I . . . . de Lon- Ratcliffe Hugonis Jermyn 

mar. Nicholaus de Salop grave v .... don de Lon- Ken- deNorff. 

Rainton Vice 

Comes London 

A«. 1622. 

V 

He also sent these extracts from the Registers of St. Christopher le Stocks, 
London : 

1600 Dec 15 Thomas Moulson and Ann Radclyffe Lie. Fac. married. 
1606 Mar. 30 Mary d. Thomas Maulson Bapt. Bur d 1 Apr. follg. 
1638-9 Jan. 10 Sir Thomas Moulson, Grocer, once Lord Maior of the Cittey of 

London Bur' 1 . 
1661 Nov. 1 Dame Anne Moulson in her own Vault in the South Chapel 
Buried. 

References to the other authorities were given. There is now no doubt in 
the matter. — Editor.] 

Daniel Spencer of Cony Hatch, Middlesex, citizen and grocer of 
London, 26 July 1665, proved 6 November 1668. To my wife Sarah that 
messuage or tenement wherein I now live, situate in Cony Hatch in the 
parish of Frian Barnett, Middlesex, as long as she shall continue a widow 
and unmarried. To my eldest son Samuel three messuages &c. in Loth- 
bury, in or near Greene's Court, within the City of London. To my son 
Daniel the messuage or Inn called the Red Lion Inn, situate in Hitchin, 
Herts., with messuages and lands in Hitchin, Hippoletts and Preston. To 
my two daughters Rebecca and Hannah Spencer three messuages &c. in 
Lothbury. To my daughter Mary Thatch the wife of Thomas Thatch a 
messuage in Lothbury. My executors to make sale of my messuages &c. 
at Gravesend and Rochester or elsewhere in lvent and in Tilbery in Essex 
and expend £500 in the purchase of lands or houses of inheritance in such 
place as they and my son in law William Tilsley shall think fit and con- 
veyance made to my said son in law and my daughter Anne his wife (ac- 
cording to my agreement as to her marriage portion). The residue of the 
money arising from these sales shall be cast into and amongst and accounted 
as part of my personal estate. To my kinsman William Carter twenty 
pounds. To my friend Robert Bird forty shillings to buy him a ring. The 

• N. B. — Name spelt Moulston, but it means Moulson. — G. W. M. 



914 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

residue to be divided among all my children except Mary Thatch. My 
wife, my son Samuel and my kinsman William Carter to be executors. 

Proved by Samuel Spencer, the son, with power reserved for issuing 
similar commissions to the other two named as executors (the widow's 
name here being given as Rebecca). 

Commission issued 4 February 1674 to Rebecca Spencer, the natural and 
lawful mother and lawfully appointed guardian of Mary Spencer, a minor 
grand daughter (nepti exjilio) of Daniel Spencer, senior deceased, to ad- 
minister the goods left unadministered by Samuel Spencer (now likewise 
deceased) one of the executors, Rebecca Spencer the relict and AVilliam 
Carter the two other executors in no wise appearing. Hene, 146. 

Thomas Hart of Enfield, merchant, 19 December 1704, proved 13 
February 1704. My will and direction is that my house and all my land 
in England, New Jersey and elsewhere in America be sold to pay all my 
just debts, excepting one town lot and one out lot in New Jersey which I 
give and bequeath unto my cousin Richard Ashfield of New York. And I 
do hereby empower Thomas Bowell of New Jersey and Rip van Dam of 
New York to sell all the said lands in America, either in parcel or the 
whole proprietry, and remit the produce thereof to Theodore Eccleston and 
John Freame &c. To the two daughters of my cousin Richard Ashfield 
deceased fifty pounds apiece, to be paid them out of the produce of my 
lands in America. To my cousin Elizabeth Holmes ten pounds. To John 
Warner of Waltham Abbey and Andrew Warner of Waltham Cross ten 
pounds apiece. To my cousin Priscilla Freame lifty pounds. To Priscilla 
Benthall, Mary Benthall and Elizabeth Benthall, the three daughters of 
my son Walter Benthall, fifty pounds apiece. To my dear sister Patience 
Ashfield, whom I do hereby constitute and appoint to be the sole executrix 
of this my last will and testament, all my plate and household goods, to her 
own proper use. To my daughter Ann Eccleston five broad pieces of gold, 
as a token of my love. To my dear sister Patience Ashfield one hundred 
pounds to be paid her before any other legacy that is herein given and 
bequeathed by me. And as for the residue and remainder of my estate 
two third parts thereof I give and bequeath unto my dear sister Patience 
Ashfield and the other third part thereof I give and bequeath unto my 
daughter Mary Benthall, wife of Walter Benthall. And 1 do hereby con- 
stitute and appoint the said John Freame and Theodore Eccleston to be 
the overseers of this my last will and testament &c. 

Proved by the solemn affirmation of Patience Ashfield/ Gee, 30. 

[Thomas Hart, one of the first twelve proprietors of East Jersey, leasing 
from Elizabeth, -widow of Sir George Carteret. Though holding his interest 
till his death, he did not probably visit this country. His nephew Richard Ash- 
field had fur a fourth child Richard Ashfield, who is named in his grandmother 
Patience Ashfield's will, and who was sheriff under Gov. Rip Van Dam in 1736, 
and who married Isabella, daughter of Gov. Lewis Morris, and died 1742. 

Walter Banthall, son in law (?) of the testator, was a proprietor as early as 
1683.— YV. K. Watkixs.] 

Patienck Ashfield of Staines, Middlesex, widow, 26 June 1708, with 
a codicil bearing date 29 June 1708, proved 7 December 1708. Refers to 
will of her brother Thomas Hart of Enfield, Middlesex, merchant deceased 
(as above) and to sundry bequests therein, among which " to my Grand son 
Richard Ashfield of New Yorke one Towne Lott and one Out Lott at 
Amboyn in New East Jersey in the province aforesaid and to each of the 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 915 

two daughters of his kinsman Richard Ashfield late of New Yorke deceased 
fifty pounds." The fifty pounds given to the deceased daughter shall be 
paid to the survivor and speedy orders sent to Rip van Dam of New York, 
merchant, in whose hands the effects are, for the due payment of the two 
fifty pounds for the sole beuefit and use of the survivor. It is my will and 
desire that all my right, title and interest of two thirds in my brother's 
estate of lands in New East Jersey, Pennsylvania and elsewhere in America, 
both as he was proprietor of the twenty fourth part and fortieth part in the 
province of East New Jersey and the like, be sold for the payment of all 
my just debts; and I do hereby empower Joseph Heale of Staines to sell, 
convey and make over all those lands &c. &c. To my impotent grandson 
Thomas Bonner Ashfield all my ten shares in the corporation of mines for 
melting down lead with pit coai and sea coal, for his proper use and main- 
tenance during his natural life ; and after his decease I give aud bequeath 
the said ten shares unto my grandson Richard Ashfield now of New York, 
for his proper use aud benefit. To my grandson Richard Ashfield one 
hundred and fifty pounds New York money, to be paid and put to interest 
upon good security for his use and benefit of his education, which I desire 
may be among Friends, in scorn called Quakers, and to put him into some 
honest trade or employ as he shall incline to when he is capable. To his 
sister Mary Ashfield fifty pounds, to be presently paid by and out of the 
effects in the hands of Rip van Dam of N«w York. Aud I do desire and 
appoint aud ordain John Rodman of New York and Isaac de Rumur of the 
same city to be overseers on behalf of my two grandchildren, Richard and 
Mary Ashfield. I do hereby appoint and ordain Joseph Heale of Staines, 
Middlesex, to be my executor in trust &c. and I give a:id bequeath unto 
him two broad pieces of gold. I give unto my loving nephews Theodore 
Eccleston and John Freame, each of them one piece of broad gold, whom 
I do hereby appoint overseers &c. To my grandson Richard Ashfield my 
husband's silver seal, with his coat of arms upon it, and my brother's steel 
seal, with his coat of arms upon it, and my quilted walnut tree box, if he 
live to come to England. To my niece Anne Eccleston, wife to Theodore 
Eccleston, one broad piece of gold. To the three daughters of Walter 
Benthall, Priscilla, Mercy and Mary Benthall, each of them one piece of 
twenty shillings broad gold and unto Dorcas and Mary Heale, daughters 
to Joseph Heale, each of them one broad twenty shillings piece of gold. 
To Elizabeth Squire of Derbyshire, my cousin, one broad piece of twenty 
shillings gold. Bequests of Mary West, daughter to William West, and 
Elizabeth Goreing. Twenty shillings to Deborah Heale to dispose to the 
AVomau's Meeting at Staines and Langford. The residue to my three 
grandchildren, Richard, Thomas Bonner Ashfield and Mary Ashfield. To 
their mother Mary, late wife to my son Richard Ashfield of New York de- 
ceased fluty pounds New York money, to be paid there if she be then liv- 
ing, and to Joseph Heale twenty pounds and to my cousin Mary Birdikin 
five pounds. To my cousin Leonard Jackson five broad pieces of gold. 
My nephew John Freame and his wife Priscilla Freame. 

In the codicil a bequest to John Eccleston, son to Theodore Eccleston. 
If all the grandchildren should depart this life before the age of eighteen 
years or without lawful issue of their bodies then of the remainder of the 
estate one third to be disposed of among poor Friends, that labor in the 
word of God, of which John Haywood is to have ten pounds, one third to 
the Women's Meetings of London, Enfield and Staines, Longford ami Ux- 
brid<re, and the other third to "thyself" (Joseph Heale the executor) " to 
dispose as thee shall see meete." Barrett, 278. 



916 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Joiin Whetcombe of Shirborne, Dorset, mercer, 2 May 1598, proved 
22 September 1598. To the parish Church there for and towards the 
reparations of the same. To Francis Scarlett, minister there. To the 
Free Grammar School there. To the Alms house and to the poor of 
Shirborne. My two hired servants and my apprentice Mellige. Elizabeth 
my wife shall have my tenement and dwelling house &c. that I bought of 
John Frye, with that parcel of land adjoining which I bought of Philip 
Manfield, during her natural life. And she shall enjoy my lease that I 
bought of Sir Walter Rawleighe, knight, for the term of thirty years &c. 
&c. Other leases. To my son Robert Whetcombe my lands and tene- 
ments in Trent, Somerset, he to allow out of said lands, to my son John, 
his brother, six pounds a year for twenty one years. I give to Robert also 
my dwelling house &c. in Shirborne. He shall have to apprentice my son 
Joseph for seven years. To my son John my lands and tenements in 
Ackerman Street, Shirborne. To son Samuel (after decease of my wife 
Elizabeth) my lease which I bought of Sir Walter Raleighe, knight, &c. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my son Symon, immediately after the 
decease of Elizabeth my wife, al' that my lease of Westcome and Spar- 
grove, lying and being in the parish of Batcombe in the County of Somer- 
set, and also the sum of fourscore pounds to be paid him at his age of 

one and "twenty years. To my daughter Jane my lease of Beare mill in 
the parish of Beere Haggat in the County of Dorset and one hundred 
pounds at her day of marriage, if she shall marry with the consent and 
good liking of her mother and my overseers. My brother Thomas Whet- 
combe's children, which be four in number, shall have twenty shillings 
apiece at the age of twenty one, i.e. Thomas, Edmond, Christian and John. 
Provisions against death of any of the sons without issue male &c. Wife 
Elizabeth to be sole executrix and M r William Mewe, my brother Hugh 
Whetcombe, my brother Edmond Lane and John Stoite to be overseers. 

Lewvn, 76. 

Symon Whitcombe citizen and clothworker of London, inhabiting in 
the parish of All Saints Staynings in the same City, 5 March 1630, proved 
7 February 1637. My loving wife Mary to be my executrix, unto whom 
(my debts being first paid and satisfied) I give and bequeath all the re- 
mainder of estate, &c. &c. and all my lands, tenements &c. in Wymbourne 
minster, Dorset. And because my estate consisting of merchandize in the 
parts beyond the seas is casual and uncertain I do therefore forbear to give 
any particular legacies to pious or charitable uses or to my kindred and 
other friends, leaving it to the Godly care and wisdom of my executrix to 
do according to the estate which God shall send to her bands, as may be 
most for the glory of God, the credit and reputation of me her husband, 
praying her to have a particular regard to Simon Whetcombe, son of my 
brother Robert Whetcombe, and to my godson Symon Wilde, the sou of 
my good friend John Wild of London merchant, as also to my servants 
which are now with me, if they shall be abiding with us at my death. 

Wit: Adoniram Byfield, Benjamin Pitt and Chris: Breres. 

Lee, 19. 

[Symon Whitcombe, the testator, who names merchandise beyond the seas, 
was probably the person whose name is found hi the charter of the Colony of 
Massachusetts Bay, and who was an Assistant of the Company. For an account 
of him see Transactions and Collections of the American Antiquarian Society, 
vol. 3, p. li.— Editor.] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 917 

Edmond Lane of Lyllington, Dorset, yeoman, 13 August 1604, proved 
26 November 1604. To Robert Lane, sou of my brother Robert, all my 
messuages &c. in Sherborne. George, another of my brother Robert's 
sons, at twenty four. Timothy Lane, another (to be placed an apprentice 
in London). Mary Lane, daughter of ray said brother Robert. Auue 
Lane, another of his daughters. To Thomas Whetcomb, sou of my brother 
in law Thomas Whetcomb, ten pounds, at his age of twenty and four years, 
and if he happen to decease before he come to that age then to his brethren. 
To Joseph Harris, son of Alice Harris ten pounds at four and twenty. 
Edmond Whetcomb, another of the sons of the said Thomas Whetcomb. 

To these preachers following, viz 1 Mr. Rowse, Mr. Crane, Mr. Wilkin- 
son, Mr. Hanley and Mr. Forwoode, forty shillings to be divided amongst 
them by even portions. I do freely forgive and remit unto John Yarde, 
Alice Harris, Anne Cooke and Edmond Harris all such debts as they or 
either of them do owe me. The residue to Alice my wife whom I ordain 
and make my full and sole executrix. And my will aud desire is that 
Hugh Whetcomb, Thomas Strowde, William Mewe, Richard Cowth, John 
Stoyt and Robert Whetcombe shall be mine overseers. 

Commission issued 30 October 1627 to Robert Lane, nephew by the 
brother of the said deceased, to administer the goods &c. not fully adminis- 
tered by Alice lately relict and executrix, now also deceased. 

Harte, 84. 

[Edward Lane, the testator, was a hrother-in-law of John Whetcombe, whose 
will and that of his son Simon precede this (ante, p. 916). The will of the 
former names him as an overseer. — Editor.] 

Barnard Randolph of London Esq. and Common Sergeant of the 
same city, 14 December 1580, with Codicils dated 29 December 1582, 24 
May 1583, 17 June 1583, 1 August 1583 and 5 August 1583, proved 24 
February 1583. My earnest desire is to be buried at Tysherst where I 
was born and where my father aud mother and first wife be buried, in the 
Chapel where my pew standeth or in some convenient place in the high 
Chancel there, " as shall seeme most meetest to my Executors, desiringe 
theme and namely my son Batherst to cause some convenient & comely 
monument to be made there as one Mr. Carewe of London hath made at 
Stone in Kent for his wife's ffather (or better)," with some " Epitath " and 
my arms to be set up within or upon the said monument. I have con- 
veyed unto Agnes my wife certain lands &c. of the yearly value of forty 
pounds, for term of her natural life, in lieu and for her jointure, which were 
conveyed by me before to sundry other uses. In recompence thereof I 
will that ray son John Randolphe shall pay yearly unto my said wife dur- 
ing her natural life, out of all my manors, lands, tenements &c. which shall 
come unto him by my death, a yearly sura or annual rent of forty pounds. 
To my said wife one hundred pounds in lieu of such household stuff as I 
meant to have given her, if she continue with me in house as a loving and 
obedient wife until my decease and not otherwise. And as for her children, 

Myhell and Thomas Smallpage I think them very well satisfied 

and that they have good cause to say and think well of me. And to the 
children of her daughter Haydock (alias Maries) which she had by the said 
Haydocke I do give one hundred pounds. And if my said wife and her son 
Myhell Smalpage had not shewed them very unquiet and unkind towards 
me, as well by their often complainings and open misreporting of me, to my 
great grief and infamy, their portions had been much better. Again he 



918 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

says of the legacy to his wife '• I give her in discharge of ray conscience and 
not for her deserving." Son in law Launcellot Batherst and his wife, my 
only daughter, Judith. Her two daughters Elizabeth and Mary. My 
sister Sabbes children. The daughter of my late brother Thomas Ran- 
dolphe. My only son John. He is joined in marriage with a good gentle- 
woman. A cup of my daughter's which was stolen out of my study in 
London when I was robbed. My manors, lands, tenements &c. in Sussex 
my son shall have after my decease. Judith, daughter of my son John. 
The daughters of my daughter Fynues. My son Fynnes. My daughter 
Villers. Sisters Sabb and Bingham. Brothers Sabb and Nepsham. My 
daughter in law Barbara Vyllers, widow of William Vyllers deceased. 
Brother in law Sir Roger Manwood, knight, Lord Chief Baron. My 
brother Lunsford. My brother Borne and his wife. My sister Wood. I 
give my seal ring of my arms that was made in " Andwarpp " to my son 
John and my seal ring of the same arms made in London to my daughter 
Judith. 

In the Codicil of 29 Dec. 1582 he prays his executors to have his body 
buried in the parish church of Mary Magdalen where he now dwells, near 
his pew, for the reason that the ways to Tysherst " are most tymes of the 
yeare verye fowle." Mention made of cousin Nicholas Fuller. Son in 
law Launcellot Batherst who before was one of my executors until he did 
refuse to let me lye in his house. Butts, 27. 

Isabkll Randolphs widow, late the wife of John Randolf gentleman 
deceased, her will made 7 May 27 Eliz :, proved 7 October 1585. John 
Skydmore Esq., John Fortescue Esq. and Thomas Pelham Esq. to be my 
executors and to them I commit the tuition, custody and bringing up of my 
children and of their parts and portions. The said Thomas Pelham and 
William Gull of Gray's Inn stand bound for me for the wardship of the 
body and land of Herbert Randolphe my son &c, My children Herbert, 
Barnard and Judith. Robert Harrys, Launcelott Bathurste, William 
Kempton and William Rowe executors of my late father in law Barnard 
Randolphe deceased. My son Barnard at seventeen years of age. My 
brother John Lunsford to be overseer of this will. My cousin Henry 
Apsley. My uncle and aunt Dallender to whom I account myself very 
much beholding. My cousins their children. My aunt Lunsford. My 
god daughter Elizabeth Finys. Brudenell, 45. 

John Browne of Horton Kirkeby, Kent, gen 1 , 3 February 1595, proved 
21 May 1590. If wife be with a child then &c. My brother Thomas 
Browne. My brother Edward Browne. My four sisters Susanne, Marye, 
Anne and Elizabeth. My wife Elizabeth. My mother Mrs Mary Lum- 
barde. I will and bequeath and my mind is that all the portions which 
are due to my brothers and sisters by my father's last will or otherwise and 
yet unpaid, that is to say, fifty pounds to my sister Susan, fifty pounds to 
my brother Edward, forty pounds to my brother Thomas and forty pounds 
apiece to the rest of my sisters, which is yet unpaid &c. shall be paid unto 
them. Some not yet of years to receive it. They to be paid at twenty 
one or day of marriage. My sister Susan Browne. My father in law Mr. 
Lumbarde and ray mother his wife. To both ray mothers Mrs Bathurst 
and Mrs Lumbard five pounds apiece. My father in law Mi - . Launceloit 
Batherste. My uncle Charles Browne gen'. My cousin Edinond Ran- 
dolfe, gentleman. My uncle Robert Batherst. My cousin Mrs. Burred. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 91 D 

Mr Edinond Peershall. My brother in law Randall Batherst. My sisters 
in law and brother in law Mary, Susan and Rauffe Batherste. Uncle 
Charles Browne and cousin Edniond Randolfe to be overseers. Wife 
Elizabeth to be executrix. 

Edinond Randolphe was one of the witnesses. Drake, 38. 

Harbkrt Randolphe of Wardes in the parish of Tyrehurst. Sussex, 
Esq., 7 April 1604. proved 28 September 1604. To be buried in the 
parish church of St. Mary Magdalen in old Fish Street, Loudon. If I die 
without issue I bequeath uuto my loving brother in law Anthony Apsley 
of the Inner Temple, gen 1 , and Judith Apsley his wife, my very loving 
sister, my manors of Hamerden Morley and Cortesley in Sussex and my 
manor of Filsham in Sussex, lately dimised and to farm letten to one 
Robert Lunsforde of Hollington, Sussex, yeoman, for divers years yet to 
come, and more lately assured and conveyed by me or intended to be assured 
&c. unto Judith Randolphe, my dear ami well beloved wife, for her jointure. 
Other lands to the said Anthony and Judith Apsley. They to have aud to 
hold the manor of Filsham immediately from and after the estates of my 
said wife and of the said Robert Lunsford shall be ended or expired. 
Reference to limitations created by Barnarde Randolphe Esq. my grand- 
father. The two hundred pounds which my father in law Anthony Sherley 
Esq. oweth me for part, of the marriage money of my said wife his daughter, 
yet unpaid, my executor shall also pay unto my wife as soou as he shall 
receive or recover the same of my said father in law. To my aunt Mrs 
Pelham, my aunt Lunsford, my cousin Judith Pelham, my cousin Thomas 
Pelham. my cousin Thomas Lunsford, my cousin Cicely Lunsford and my 
cousin Grace Stapley, to every of them five pounds. To my cousin Mary 
Lunsford forty shillings. To my wife's brothers and sisters eighteen pounds 
to be equally divided between them. To Mrs Margery Graunte my poor 
kinswoman twenty nobles. To Mr. Davenporte sometimes my tutor in 
Queen's College Cambridge, in thankful gratuity towards him for his kind- 
ness shewed me when I was pupil there, ten pounds to buy him a gelding. 
To Mr. Shepheard. my father in law's chaplin, ten pounds. The residue 
to my brother in law Anthony Apsley who I do make sole executor. I 
desire my very good uncles Thomas Pelham Esq. and John Lunsford Esq. 
and my very good cousin Anthony Stapley Esq. to be overseers, and that 
they will be pleased to take the small gift of ten pounds apiece. 

A memorandum follows concerning certain interlineations. " I Nich. 
Bestuey was present at his Bedsyde when the Testator upon Satturdaye 
the seaventhe of Aprill One thowsand sixe hundred aud fower Jac. 2. abowte 
sixe of y e clocke at nighte did publishe this as his last will and testament 
in mv hearinfre." 

Richard Sheppard was one of the witnesses. Harte. 77. 

Siu Samukl Argall of London knight, " beinge now preste to seme 
his Maiestie in a voyage intended by sea," 23 May 1G25, proved 21 March 
1625. To my three loving sisters, viz' my sister the Lady Filmer, my 
sister Batherst and my sister the Lady Fleetwood, to every of them twenty 
pounds apiece to buy every of them a piece of plate of that value in re- 
membrance of my love. To Anne Percivall the wife of Samuel Percivall 
of London, chandler, one hundred pounds. To Sara Filmer my niece, 
Samuel Batherst my nephew, Samuel Filmer, my nephew Sir Robert Fil- 
ler's son and my niece Katheriue Barham's son, my godson, to every of 



920 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

them ten pounds apiece, to be paid unto them or their parents. To the 
Master and Fraternity of the Trinity House a piece of plate ten pounds 
value with my name and arms thereupon for a remembrance of me, for I 
am a brother of their Company. To my friend Nicholas Hawes gentleman 
one hundred pounds and also my sword with the silver hilt gilded over, 
which I promised him long agone. To my friend Richard Fowler one 
hundred pounds. To Judith Buckhurst widow of Thomas Buckhurst, late 
of Staplehurst Kent, gentleman, forty pounds a year to be paid out of my 
capital messuage and lands called Lowhall in Walthamstowe, Essex, now 
in the occupation of John Benfield by lease dated 5 March 1G15. I give 
to her all the plate which I shall have at the time of my decease and all 
bedding bed linen and table linen &c. I am to pay my sister the Lady 
Argall five pounds yearly during her life out of my manor of Lowhall. 
To Dorothy Buckhurst one of the daughters of Judith Buckhurst all my 
lands, tenements &c. in Walthamstowe, being parcel of said manor, now in 
tenure of Richard Hughes under a yearly rent of forty pounds. To Anne 
Buckhurst, another of the daughters of the said Judith, all the lands, parcel 
of the said manor, now in the occupation of Lyonell Arnolde, at twenty 
pounds a year, and other lands; their mother to receive the rents &c. until 
the said Dorothy and Anne come to their several ages of one and twenty years 
or days of marriage. If they die without issue of their bodies lawfully 
begotten I give the said lands &c. to Samuel Argall my godson and nephew, 
the son of my brother John Argall Esq. To the said Samuel, my nephew, 
my manor of Lawehall (sic.) &c, my brother John to receive the rents &c. 
for and towards the education and bringing up of my said nephew until his 
full age &c. I do further give to the abovenamed Anne Percivall all my 
lands &c. in Virginia. To the poor of East Sutton, Kent, ten pounds, to 
be distributed by my brother in law Sir Edward Fillmer, knight. To John 
Carter my servant twenty pounds. To Josias Wroth, who now attendeth 
upon me, thirty pounds. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my loving brother in law Edmond Ran- 
dolf Esq. the sum of twenty pounds to be paid unto him within six months 
next after my decease. I make my said brother John Argall and my good 
friend Nicholas Hawes my sole and only executors. And if they do not 
pay and perform this my last will &c. according to the true meaning &c. 
then I make my aforesaid loving brother in law Edmonde Randolph and 
Edward Batherst brother to Judith Bathurst aforesaid my executors. 

Proved by Nicholas Hawes, power reserved for John Argall. 

Hele, 69. 

Barnard Randolph of Biddenden, Kent, gen'., 2 May 1628, proved 
27 May 1628. My body to be buried near unto my well beloved wife in 
the middle chancel of the parish church of Biddenden. And I do will 
also and appoint a fair and firm tombstone to be laid over my body, with the 
name of myself and my dear wife deceased and all my children to be inlaid 
and engraven in brass. To the poor of the parish twenty shillings a year 
on each Palm Sunday in the two next years after my decease. Four 
pounds per annum to have four sermons quarterly to be made within the 
parish church of Biddenden by some learned divine, to continue the three 
next years &c, and at every lecture I do also appoint ten shillings to be 
spent on their dinner. Five pounds to be bestowed on the highways 
between my son William's dwelling house and Worchiuden Green. To 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 921 

my brother's sou Robert Randolph, servant unto iny son William, five 
pounds and to his brothers and sisters and my sister Meere's children 
living ten shillings apiece. To Zephaniah Lapham, my son Herbert's 
servant, three pounds. To John Newman and Francis Stedman ten 
shillings apiece if dwelling with my sou Herbert at time of my death. 
To John Randolph my son, having advanced him already with a sufficient 
portion, which I pray (Jod bless him withall, twenty shillings and no 
greater legacy. A similar bequest to son Herbert Randolph, with all 
the movable goods &c. in or about the house I now dwell in except my 
silver plate &c. To my son Edmoud Randolph one hundred pounds. To 
William Randolph my eldest son (certain furniture) and all my books 
whatsoever and wheresoever. To mv daughter Elizabeth, wife of Robert 
Perry, having already advanced her at her marriage with a competent por- 
tion, twenty shillings and no greater legacy. To Elizabeth, Jane and Mary 
Randolph, the three daughters of my son William, four hundred pounds to 
be divided between them, one hundred to Elizabeth, two hundred to Jane and 
the other hundred to Mary, to be paid at their several ages of eighteen or 
days of marriage &c. To my loving cousiu Edmond Randolph Esq. five 
pounds as a token of my love to him. And I do make and iutreat him to 
be supervisor of this my will. The residue to William my eldest son whom 
I make executor. My sons William, John and Edmoud to release and 
assure to their brother Herbert their estates and interest in my lands in 
Hedcorne which were the inheritance of their dear mother deceased. 

Barrington, 50. 

John Randolph of London, merchant taylor, 24 March 1627, proved 
27 March 1628. He "being sicke and weake did in the presentes of us 
whose names are here underwritten declare his desire and request and did 
giue and bequeath that land w ch . he hath and w ch . he did purchase w ch . lyes 
in the couutie of Kent unto his now wife during her life and if she should be 
w th . child and should haue a sonne then the laud to come to him after her 
decease, but if she should haue noe sonne, Then the land to come unto his 
daughter Sara. And for want of issue of the said Sara then he giues and 
bequeaths unto his brother Edmund Randolph foreuer the aforesaid land." 

Commission issued (as above) to Judith Randolph his relict to administer 
according to the tenor of the will, no execcutor having been named. 

Commission issued 27 June 1634 to Thomas Lewes, citizen and draper 
of London, to administer the goods and credits of the said deceased (ac- 
cording to the tenor and effect of the will) left unadministered by Judith 
Lewes ah Randolph, lately relict and administratrix (now also deceased), 
during the minority of Sara Randolph, natural and lawful daughter of the 
deceased, &c. Barrington, 25. 

William Randolph of Biddenden, Kent, clothier, 20 November 17 th 
Charles, proved 26 November 1647. To be buried near uuto the bodies 
of my loving father and mother in the middle chancel of the parish church 
of Biddenden, and a fair and firm tombstone to be laid over my body, with 
the names of myself and my loving wife and all m} T children to be inlaid 
and ingraven in brass. To my kinsman Robert Randolph, now dwelling 
with me, ten pounds. To Thomas Champs my servant fort}' shillings. To 
my daughter Elizabeth Dyne forty shillings, and no greater legacy, having 
preferred her in marriage and given a competent portion with her. To 



922 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

my sou in law John Dyne thirty shillings to buy a ring- To my godchil 
dren Herbert Randolph junior and Deborah Randolph junior and Elizabeth 
Curtis and Martha Curtis, daughters of Nathaniel Curtis, twenty shillings 
to every of them. To my three sisters in law Deborah Randolph, Martha 
Curtis and Margaret Ginder, uuto each of them four nobles apiece to buy 
each of them a ring. To Elizabeth Curtis my mother in law and James 
Curtis her son, unto each of them five pounds. To my brothers Edmond 
Randolph, Harbert Randolph and Samuel Curtis, unto each of them, 
ten pounds. And I do appoint them to be overseers of my will, &c. 
To William Randolph my younger son all my part, being a moiety or one 
half, of the lease of the parsonage and other lands in Burham and Ailesford, 
now in the occupation of Thomas Vaugham and Robert Everden : also 
fifteen hundred pounds, to be held by the said three in trust for him (he 
under thirteen years of age). To my said son William all my plate that is 
now marked with the letters W and R ; and all my plate marked with the letters 
B and R I give unto rny son Barnard Randolph. Provision made for dear 
and loving wife. To my daughter Jane Randolph (to increase her portion 
of two hundred pounds formerly given her by her grandfather, which she 
hath already received) the sum of five hundred pounds. To my daughter 
Mary Randolph (to increase her portion of one hundred pounds formerly 
bequeathed to her by her grandfather in his will) five hundred pounds. 
To my three youngest daughters, Sarah, Susan and Margaret Randolph, 
five hundred pounds each (in trust &c). Certain lands to son Barnard 
Randolph. Barnard to be executor when he shall accomplish the full age 
of one and twenty years, and during his minority my wife to be executor; 
but if she shall marry again during his minority she shall leave and sur- 
render the power of executorship unto my three overseers &c. 

Commission issued as above to Samuel Curtis, uncle on the mother's side 
(avunculo) to Sara, Susanna, William and Margaret Randolph children of 

the deceased, for the reason that Randolph, relict, and Barnard 

Randolph, son, the executors named in the will, had died (ab hac luce 
migrauerit) before taking upon themselves the burden of executorship. 

Fines, 218. 

Edmond Randolph of the parish of St. George the Martyr in the city 
of Canterbury. Doctor in Physick, 8 October 1643, with a codicil added, 
18 October 1643, proved 25 July 1654. To wife Deborah, having other- 
wise provided for her by her jointure (certain bedding &c). To my four 
sons William, Thomas, Francis and Giles Randolphe and to my five daugh- 
ters Deborah, Elizabeth Mary, Jane and Joice Randolph and to that child 
my wife now goeth withall, to every one of them two hundred and fifty pounds 
at their several and respective ages of one and twenty years. Provisions 
for their maintenance and bringing up. Certain properties to be held till 
Edward my son attain his full age of one and twenty years. My wife 
Deborah to be executrix until said Edward shall attain this age; then he to 
be sole executor. All my messuages, lands &c. to the said Edward when 
he accomplish his said age &c. My loving brother M r . Ilarberte Randolphe 
of Beddenden and my good friend Mr. John Crane of Canterbury, the 
elder, to be overseers, to each of whom forty shillings. 

Proved by the oath of Edward Randolphe, the son &c. 

Alchin, 100. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 923 

Thomas Randolph, son of Edmund Randolph Doctor in Physick late 
deceased, of Canterbury, 23 June L659 proved 7 March 16G1. To every 
one of my brothers and sisters, viz 1 . Elizabeth Randolph, William, Mary, 
Gyles, Jane and Bernard, every one and each of them to demand of my 
brother Edward Randolph twenty pounds p piece, or of whoever shall be 
possessed of my estate. To my sister Deborah Swaffer twenty pounds and 
to her children Edmund, Thomas and John live pounds p piece. Whatever 
else shall remain I do will to be divided between my mother and brother 
Edward Randolph or to fall to the survivor of either of them. My brother 
Edward to be the executor. 

Proved by Edward Randolph the brother &c. Laud, 46. 

Edward Randolph Esq r . " Surveyour Gen 11 , of Ma tles . Customes in all 
her Plantations and Colonies in America," 15 dune 1702 proved 7 Decem- 
ber 1703. " Being about to make my seaventeenth sea voyage to America." 
To my youngest daughter Sarah Randolph (who is otherwise unprovided for) 
all such sum and sums of money as are or shall be due me of ray salary as Sur- 
vevor General, payable from the Commissioners of Her Majesty's Customs for 
the time being, and which I have not already given to my daughter Williams 
or to my daughter Deborah Randolph, which said salary is usually received 
and paid for me by my worthy friend Richard Savage Esq. I do also give 
and bequeath unto my said daughter Sarah all my plate which I leave in 
the hands of my loving friend Mr. Edward Jones of the Savoy, and all 
such sum and sums of money as is or shall be recovered for my use of 
Gilbert Nelson, late Chief Justice of the Island of Bermuda, whether the 
same be in the hands of Mr. Samuel Spofforth or any other person whom- 
soever, and all such sums &c. as shall be recovered of George Plater Esq. 
living in " Potuxent " in the Province of Maryland and which the said 
Plater hath or may receive for my use of Samuel Wilson or any other 
person. If Sarah shall happen to depart this life before she attain the 
age of eighteen years and be married (which I enjoin and require her not 
to do without the consent and approbation of Mrs Mary Fog and Nathaniel 
Bladen of Lincoln's Inn Esq. thereunto in writing first had and obtained) 
then I will that my daughter Elizabeth Pirn and (if she be dead) her son Mr 
Charles Pirn, or her and his children, shall have all that is herein bequeathed 
to my said daughter Sarah. None of these living, then to my daughters 
Williams and Deborah and their children equally. I make my said daugh- 
ter Sarah my sole executrix. 

Wit: Humphrey Walcot gen'., Mrs Catherine Bladen and Nathaniel 
Bladen. 

Commission issued (as above) to Sarah, wife of John Howard, lawfully 
appointed guardian of Sara Randolph minor daughter of and executrix 
named in the will of Edward Randolph lately of Acquamac in Virginia 
deceased &c. Degg, 234. 

[In my "Notes on Edward Randolph" ("Historical Papers" of the late 
Charles W. Tuttle, Ph.D., Boston, 1889, pp. 282-376), I presented substantially 
all the genealogical information then accessible to me respecting Edward Ran- 
dolph and his more immediate ancestors. The wills of his father Dr. Edmund 
Randolph, of his grandfather Bernard Randolph, and of his uncles William 
and John Randolph, here given, supply us with other items of genealogical 
value. It is stated in said "Notes*' (p. 283) on "family tradition," that the 
above named John emigrated to Virginia. His will would seem to make this 
improbable ; but, if he did emigrate, he returned to England prior to 27 March, 
1G28. 



924 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

The will of Edward Randolph, of which an abstract is given above, will be 
found in full in Tuttle's "Historical Papers" above meutioned (pp. 280-281). 
He was a son of Doctor Edmund Randolph and his wife Deborah Master, 
daughter of Gyles Master, Esquire, all of the city of Canterbury. He was bred 
to the law, having been admitted to Gray's Inn, 10 November, 1650. He was 
married three times. His first wife was Jano, daughter of Thomas Gibbon of 
West Cliffe, Kent, by his wife Alice (Taylor) Gibbon. He married for his 
second wife, Grace Grenville of London, who died in Boston, U. S. A., in 1682. 
He married, thirdly, Mrs. Sarah (Backhouse) Piatt, widow of Peter Piatt, in 
London, 24 December, 1684. As his wife is not mentioned in his will, it may 
be presumed that she died before 15 June, 1702. 

From his will and letters we obtain the names of five, perhaps of all, his 
children, namely, Jane, Deborah, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah. Jane married a 
Williams; Mary married, subsequently to 1702, Thomas Smith, M.D., of 
Maidstone; Elizabeth married a Pirn (or Pym) ; Mary had deceased probably 
before 1702 ; Sarah, daughter by the last wife, was born after 1G84, as she had 
not reached the age of eighteen years at the date of his will. He left at least 
one grandson, namely, Charles Pim, son of his daughter Elizabeth. The occur- 
rence of the same names of children in the different generations of the Randolphs 
of Kent and of Sussex adds strength to the presumption that they were 
descended from the same original ancestor. — Albert H. Hoyt.] 

"Barnard 1 Randolph of London Esq. and Common Sergeant of the same 
city " was also of Wardis, Sussex. He was admitted to the office of common 
Serjeant, March 4, 1563. Prior to December, 1582, he "charitably agreed to 
bestow a large sum of money for bringing water out of the River Thames, by 
an engine to be constructed by Peter Morice, from London Bridge to Old Fish 
Street, in like manner as he had already brought the water to Leadenhall, and 
by the way to supply the private houses of the citizens, which offer had been 
approved by the Court of Aldermen," etc. His charities in this kind amounted 
to £1800. Partly administered by the Fishmongers' Company. 

January 28, 1582-3, Queen Elizabeth wrote to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, etc. 
" that Barnard Randolph, Common Serjeant, through age and infirmities was 
unable to fulfil his duties." " The Queen recommended Julius Caesar, Doctor of 
Civil Law, for the place and desired them to award some reasonable portion of the 
profits to Randolph during his life," etc. In February, 1582-3, the Lord Mayor 
wrote to Sir Francis Walsingham acknowledging her Majesty's letters in favor 
of the appointment of Dr. Coesar, as deputy to Bernard Randolph. The matter 
had been brought before the Courts of Aldermen and Common Council. Mr. 
Randolph " had in both Courts delivered openly his answer in tears, declaring 
his desire to remain and to die an officer of the City, and his most humble peti- 
tion that intercession might be made for him to Her Majesty, not to command 
him to be removed," and the Common Council became humble petitioners for 
him to her majesty. 

Sir Thomas Randolph (1523-1590), the celebrated diplomatist, who was prob- 
ably of the same family as Barnard aforesaid, married a relative of Walsingham. 

Thomas Kirton Avas admitted to the office of common serjeant, loco Barnard 1 
Randolph, Esq., deceased, August 15, 1583. 

His daughter Judith 2 Randolph, who married " Launcellot Batherst," hid 
issue three daughters, namely : Elizabeth, 3 who married John Browne, Esq. ; 
Mary, 3 who married Edmund Peshall, Esq. ; Susan, 3 who married Robert Owen, 
Esq,; and the following sons : 1, Randolph 3 ; 2, Lancelot 3 ; 3, Edward 3 ; and 4, 
George 3 Bathurst, Avith " Rauffe " mentioned in the will of John Browne of Hor- 
ton Kirkeby, of whom I know nothing. 

4. George 3 Bathurst, the fourth son, b. 1587, m. in 1610 Elizabeth Villiers, 
and had by her thirteen sons and four daughters. Their youngest son, Sir Ben- 
jamin 3 Bathurst, m. Frances, daughter of Sir Allen Apsley of Apsley in Sussex, 
and their son Allen* Bathurst was created Baron Bathurst January 1, 1712, and 
Earl Bathurst August 27, 1772. 

1. Randolph 3 Bathurst, the eldest son, married Catherine Argall, and they 
were the parents of Judith 4 Bathurst (who married "Thomas Buckhurst ") , 
Sir Edward 4 Bathurst and Samuel 4 Bathnrst, mentioned in Sir Samuel Argall's 
will. There were probably other children. 

The Edmond Randolph mentioned in John Browne's will, I suppose to be the 
Edmond Randolph (who married Margarett Argall) mentioned in Sir Samuel 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 925 

Argall's will; and may ^ the " loving cousin Edmond Randolph Esq" mentioned 
in the will of Barnard Randolph of Biddendcn in 1628. 

I cannot now refer to the best county histories of Sussex aud Kent; but I am 
under the impression that the Randolphs of these two counties were of the 
same original stock. The Randolphs of Virginia are said to have been origin- 
ally from Sussex. The line as prepared for me by the late Rev. Edmund Ran- 
dolph, of the Isle of Wight, England, and published in The Critic, Richmond, 
Virginia, a few years ago, is as follows : 

Robert Randolph of Hams, Sussex, m. Rose, dau. of Thomas Roberts of 
Hawkhurst, Kent. 
I. William,* b. 1572, d. 1600; settled at Little Houghton, Northamptonshire; 
m. 1st, Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Smith of Nawnham, and had issue : 

1. Thomas, the poet, b. June 15, 1605; d. March, 1634. 

2. William, b. 1607. 

3. Robert, b. ; d. 1671. 

4. Elizabeth, b. 1613; m. Burkett. 

I. William Randolph m. 2d, Dorothy, dau. of Richard Lane, and widow of 
Thomas West. 

5. John. 

6. Richard, b. 1621; d. 1671; ra. Elizabeth Ryland. 

i. Richard. 

ii. William, b. 1651; emigrated to Virginia about 1669; d. 1711. 
Left issue in Virginia. 

7. Henry, b. 1623; went to Virginia in 1643; clerk Henrico Co., clerk 

House of Burgesses, etc. Left issue in Virginia. 

8. Anne, b. 1625 ; d. infant. 

9. George, b. 1627 ; killed before the battle of Naseby. 

10. Margaret, b. 1629. 

11. Judith, b. 1630. 

The " M r Edmond Peershall " mentioned in John Browne's will (1596), I take 
to be the Edmond Peshall. Esq. who married Mary 3 Bathurst. He is mentioned 
in " The Genesis of the United States," pp. 225, 257, 387, 826, 962, 965. Most 
of those named in Sir Samuel Argall's will can be located by the extract from 
the Argall pedigree given in that Avork on pp. 814-815. For other references see 
the Index. 

I am glad that Mr. Waters has established the date of Sir Samuel's death. 
When compiling the sketches for my work, I noted the extract from Capt. Pen- 
nington's letter^ first published in "The Aspinwall Papers," Mass. Hist. Soc. 
Coll., Vol. IX., fourth series, and afterwards in "The Dictionary of National 
Biography," Vol. II., p. 80. I also noted that Strype gave 1633 as the date of 
his bequest to "The Trinity House," and that others had placed his death in 
1639. I asked a friend in London to read the whole of Pennington's letter aud 
to reconcile the dates, if he could. The reply Avas that " it was the master of 
the Swiftsure who died in 1626, and not Argall." The language of the letter 
seems not to have been very clear. In the light of the will, it is now evident 
from this letter that Argall died on January 24, 1625-6. — Alexander Brown, 
of Norwood, Nelson Co., Vu. 

William Poole of Shute, Devon, Esq. (date not specified) proved 14 
October 1587. To be buried where my wife shall appoint. To the Vicars 
of Colyton and Seaton. I have appointed to Katherine my wife, for her 
jointure, for term of her life, the manor of Blackborne boty and my moiety 
of the manor of Beare (and other lands &c). Other bequests to her. 
And my will is that the said Katherine my wife shall have the "manu- 
raunce," usage aud occupation of my house and Park of Shute &c. for three 
score years if she so long live, and after that term it shall be to my son and 

* Mr. William Randolph lived first at Hams, near Lewes in Sussex, and afterwards 
settled at Little Houghton. He was steward to Edward Lord Zoueh, of whom there is a 
portrait and sketch in " The Genesis," see p. 1063 and index. Ben Jonson was Lord Zouch's 
intimate friend, and he adopted Mr. William Randolph's son Thomas, the poet, as one of 
his literary sons. Alexander Brown. 



926 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

heir apparent William Poole for term of four score years if he so long shall 
live and after said term ended it shall be to William Poole son of the last- 
named William Poole my heir apparent by Mary his wife daughter of Mr. 
Justice Periam for four score and nineteen years if he the same William 
Poole now being the youngest so long shall live, and after said term ended 
it shall be to such person or persons as from time to time shall be the heir 
male of my body lawfully begotten during the term of one thousand and one 
hundred years from thence next following and fully to be complete, re- 
mainder to mine heirs female &c. To every of my cousins William and 
Thomas Broughtou one yearly rent of four pounds &c. To Laurett Grene 
my goddaughter forty shillings yearly so long as she shall serve my wife 
and at the day of my wife's death ten pounds so as she shall marry with 
the consent of Leonard Grene her brother. The executors to be John 
Popham Esq. the Queen's Majesty's Attorney General, Thomas Hanhain 
and George Wadham Esqs. Spencer, 62. 

[William Poole of Shute, Devon, the testator, married Katharine Popham, 
sister of Sir John Popham, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, and aunt 
of Capt. George Popham (ante, p. 460), the leader of the short-lived colony 
that settled in August, 1607, near the mouth of the Kennebec River. The 
testator was buried at Shute, Aug. 24, 1587. His widow was buried there 
Nov. 9, 1588.— Editor.] 

Sir William Pole of Colcombe, Devon, knight aged 74 years the 
Thirtieth of August last, will made 30 December 1635, proved 25 Feb- 
ruary 1636. To be buried near the body of my deceased father on the 
South side of my Aisle of burial near the place my grand nephew John 
Pole is lately interred, with such monument as my wife and eldest son shall 
think fit, not requiring extraordinary cost but decency. My will is that the 
Lady Jane my now wife shall have all such plate as I had by the intermar- 
riage with her, as well the fashion not altered as sithence by her appoint- 
ment altered and changed into new fashion, with all Jewells, chains and 
other ornaments which belonged unto her. Other bequests to her. To 
my eldest son Sir John Pole, knight (certain plate and household stuff). 
My will is that William Pole my son shall have five hundred pounds whereof 
three hundred pounds was in the hands of Francis Courtney of Powderham 
Esq., thereof fifty pounds paid unto my said son the rest remained in his 
hands. The other two hundred my wife is contented to pay if she overlive 
me six months. 

By a nuncupative codicil the testator appointed Sir John Pole Bart 1 ., his 
natural, lawful and eldest son, to be his sole executor. 

Administration issued forth, 25 June 1658, to Sir Courtney Pole Baronet, 
the natural and lawful grandchild of Sir William Pole late of Holcombe, 
Devon, knight, deceased, to administer the goods &c. of the said deceased 
left unadministered by Sir John Pole Bar 1 ., son and sole executor &c. since 
also deceased. Goare, 38. 

[Sir William Pole, the testator, son of the preceding, was the well known 
antiquary, author of " Collections towards a Description of Devonshire," 4to. 
London, 1791. He was the father of William Pole, or Poole, the schoolmaster 
at Dorchester, Mass. (whose epitaph is printed in the Register, vol. ii., page 381) 
and of Miss Elizabeth Poole, the first known settler of Taunton, Mass. 

Sir William Pole was bp. Aug. 27, 1561, at Shute, Devon, and d. in Feb., 1635-6. 
His burial is entered on the Colyton Register as " 10th day of March, 1635"; 
but in the Appendix to his published '-Collections" he is said to have died "on 
the 9th of February at his house of Colcombe in the seventy-fourth year of his 
age." There is an original picture of him at Shute House. — (History of Taun- 
ton, Mass., by Rev. S. H. Emery, Syracuse, 1893, page G7, where other facts 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 927 

concerning him will be found.) He married 1st, Mary, dan. and coheir of Sii 
William Periam, Knt, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer; and 2d, Jane, dan. 
of "William Symes, Esq., and widow of Roger How of London, merchaut. 
There is a pedigree of this family in the " Visitations of the County of Devon," 
edited by Lieut. Col. J. L. Vivian, pages 602-4, commencing before the time of 
Henry II. and coming down to the present century, to which work I am in- 
debted for many of my facts. The children of Sir William were all by his first 
wife. His sons were: 1. Sir John, created a baronet Sept. 12, 1628; in 1st, his 
step sister, Elizabeth, dan. of Roger and Jane (Symes) How'; 2d, Mary, widow 
of William Lechlaud. 2. William, bur. Aug. 19, 1536. 3. Periam, bp. Aug. 16, 
1592; mat. at Exeter College, Oxford, Nov. 3, 1G09, aged 17; B.A. Dec. 12, 
1609; student of the Inner Temple, 1612, as of Shute, Devon, gen. (Foster's 
Alumni Oxonienses, vol. 3, p. 1176). He m. Dorothy Hippesley, and settled in 
Ireland, where he acquired large possessions. 4, 5 and 6. William, Arthur and 
Francis, triplets, bp. Dec. 4, 1593. William came to NewEnglaud. (Seebeloic.) 
Arthur d. in childhood from a fall. Francis mat. at Oriel College, Oxford, March 
24, 1609-10, aged 16: B.A. Nov. 3, 1612; M.A. from Hart Hall, June 12, 1616; 
vicar of Tregony, Cornwall, 1623 (Foster's Alumni Oxonienses, vol. 3, p. 1175 . 
He d. 1627. The daughters of Sir William Pole were : 1. Mary, bp. June 26, 1536 ; 
m. 1st, April 5 1602, Nicholas Hurst; m. 2d, Nov. 7, 1606, Francis, sou and 
heir of Sir William Courteney of Powderhara, Devon. 2. Katharine, bp. Aug. 
20, 1587; m. Thomas Southcote of Ottery Mohun. 3. Elizabeth, bp. Aug. 25, 
1583; came to New England; d. May 21, 1654, aged 65. — (See Emery's Ministry 
of Taunton, vol. i., pp. 42-3.) 4. Anne, bp. Nov. 1, 1589; m. Edward Walroud 
of Bovey, Devon; mar. lie. Jan. 5, 1611-12, Exeter. 5. Eleanor, bp. May 22, 
1597; m. Anthony Floyer of Floyers Hayes. A pedigree of this family of Pole, 
by Samuel G. Drake, A.M., is printed in his editiou of Baylies's History of 
New Plymouth, Part v. (vol. ii.), page 28. See also Wottou's English Baro- 
netage, London, 1741, vol. ii., pp. 124-29. 

William Pole (above named), son of the testator, was mat. at Oriel College. 
Oxford, March 24, 1609-10, a. 16; B.A. Nov. 3, 1612; student of the Inner Tem- 
ple, 1616, as of Colyton, gen. (Foster's Alumni Oxonienses. vol. 3, p. 1176 . 
He and his sister Elizabeth came to New England as early as 1637. He settled 
at Dorchester, but after a short stay there removed to Taunton. He returned 
to Dorchester as early as 1660, and died there Feb. 25, 1674-5, aged 81. A 
biographical notice of him, by William B. Trask, A.M., is printed in the Dor- 
chester Antiquarian Society's History of Dorchester, pp. 487-9. — Editor.] 

[This William Pole is mentioned prominently in the early days of Taunton, 
1639, as Capt. William Pole. He was a deputy of Taunton to Plymouth iu 
that and other years, and was also member of the Council of War. He 
moved to Dorchester in 1660, where his son Theophilus was born 27 May that 
year. He held the offices of clerk of the writs and schoolmaster iu Dorchester, 
where he died 24 Feb. 1674-5. On his tomb was engraved an epitaph of his 
own composition. Jane, his wife, survived him. From depositions in the 
Suffolk and Bristol County records, there seems to be a relationship with the 
Farwell family at Taunton, though it may be through William Pole rather than 
his wife. Jane, widow of William, died"9 Sapt. 1690. ,Hcr will, dated 29 Aug. 
1690, mentions son John and his wife, daughters Bethesda Fil«r (wife of John 
Filer) and Mary Henchman (wife of Daniel Henchman), a grandson, John Pole 
(who died before 1711), and his sister Jane (who married Timothy Lindall). 
The children of William and Jane Pole were : John, b. 1639, d. 1711 ^Nathaniel, 
living in 1654 ; Timothy, drowned at Taunton 1667 ; Mary, m. Daniel Henchman ; 
Bethesda, m. 1686, John Filer; William, bapt. 1658, d. 21 April, 1687; Theophi- 
lus, b. 1660.— W. K. Watkixs.] 

Dorothy Pole of Tallaton, Devon, widow. 24 January 1651, proved 
18 February 1651. To my daughter Dorothy Pole two hundred pounds 
To my daughter Mary Pole two hundred pounds. To my son Theodor 
Pole one hundred pounds. To my son Periam Pole the best cow which I 
shall be possessed of at the time of my death. Whatever shall be recovered 
in the suite or suites for the recovery of the issues and profits of certain 
parcels as appurtenances of the farm of Soulhcotts shall be equally divided 



928 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

amongst all rny children. The household stuff in my farm house called 
High Haine in the parish of Morton Hamsteed shall be equally divided 
between my two daughters Dorothy and Mary and my said two sons Periam 
and Theodor. The rest of my goods &c. I give and bequeath unto my son 
Nathaniel whom I make sole executor. Theodor a minor. A tenement at 
Charmouth. 

Proved by Nathaniel Pole, son and executor. Bowyer, 41. 

Lady Jane Pole of Coleton, Devon, widow, 29 August 1653, proved 
10 June 1654. To be buried in the aisle of the church in Coleton where 
my last hucband Sir William Pole, knight, and my dear daughter, first wife 
of Sir John Pole, Baronet, lie interred. There is paid unto the hands of 
Sir John Pole, Baronet, four hundred pounds due to me upon his promise 
anu agreement made unto me and with me which is known unto Courtnay 
Pole my grandson and also to my brother Shapcott of Exeter and unto 
John Merefield of Crewkerne in Somerset Esq., which also appears by a 
letter under his hand to me bearing date 1 August instant. This to be 
bestowed in a purchase of certain lands in Yorkshire. To my said grand- 
son Courtney Pole all my lands &c. in any part of England and all moneys 
which shall be recovered against any person except that debt owing to me 
from Sir William Pole my grandchild lately deceased. To Martha Every 
my grandchild a silver tankard on which is my coat of Arms of " Symses" 
engraven. To Elizabeth Pole my grandchild twenty pounds. To my 
daughter (sic) Pole the wife of Courtney Pole my grandson five pounds to 
buy her a watch. To Jane Pole the daughter of Courtney Pole an annuity 
of five pounds until she be married. This to be employed in a gown or in 
other cloathes every year for her. This is a remembrance unto her that she 
had a grandmother loved her. To John Pole, the son of Courtney, I 
have already given the house I now live in to descend to him after the 
death of his father and mother. There was from Sir William Pole my 
grandchild deceased owing to me two hundred and fifty pounds, still due 
and unpaid, and for the recovery of which there were and are suites de- 
pending for me against the Lady Katherine Pole deceased, her brother 
John Symberke (sic.) Esq. and others to whom Sir William Pole's estate 
came as executors, administrators or otherwise. Directions given as to this. 
This sum to my executor until Katherine and Jane Pole, eldest daughters 
to the said Sir William Pole do both of them attain to the ages of sixteen 
years and then one half to Katherine and the other half to Jane. If either 
die before that age then her half to the third daughter of the said Sir 
William Pole, (and so on). To my brother John Symes Esq. and to each 
of his sons, my cousin Henry and my cousin Thomas, a ring. A ring also 
to my brother Shapcote and another to his wife. I do constitute and appoint 
Courtney Pole Esq. my grandson my sole executor, to whom I give, over 
and besides what I have already done, all such moneys as shall be due to 
me at my death from Sir John Pole his father or from any other person. 

Alchin, 13. 

Sir John Pole of Shute, Devon, Bar 4 ., 10 June 1707, proved 15 May 
1708. To my friends Sir John Trevelian of Nettlecomb, Somerset, 
Baronet, my son in law Sir Thomas Putt of Combe, Devon, Baronet, and 
James Sheppard of the Middle Temple Loudon Esq., their executors, 
administrators and assigns, all my barton, farm and tenement or tenements 
called English Hayes &c. in Talliton, Devon, &c. to hold for two thousand 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 929 

years upon trust lie. To ruy wife the Lady Anne Pole, towards the aug- 
mentation of her jointure, five hundred pounds &c. To my son Carolus 
Pole (the hetter to enahle him to repay and discharge the moneys borrowed 
of Mrs Anne Fry and Mrs. Patience Ilumfry towards his paying of my 
mortgage ou Hedge End) five hundred pounds. To my said son Carolus, 
for his better support aud maintenance until he shall attain to the age of 
four and twenty years (when he takes upon him his intended holy function) 
an annuity of four score pounds. To my son John Pole, for and towards 
his better support &c, an annuity of eighty pounds during his natural life. 
To my eldest son William Pole the fee and inheritance of all my lands &c. 
To my wife the china and other fine cloame commonly used for the ornament 
of my house, also all her Jewells usually worn about her or brought by her 
into the family &c. To my niece Mrs Mary Moyle twenty guineas of 
gold for mourning. Others. My son William to be executor. 

Barrett, 123. 

Lapy Anne Pole relict of Sir John Pole, Baronet, of Shute, Devon, 
her will made 27 September 1711 (in Great Russell Street), proved 
15 March 1713. To my eldest son Sir William Pole all my pictures I left 
behind me in Shute House, except that picture of my daughter Trevelian's 
which 1 jrive to my son Carolus Pole. I <nve also to Sir William such of 
my pictures as are here in town, viz', the Earl and Countess of Radnor, 
my son and daughter Treveliau, Sir Nicholas Morice, Sir Thomas Putts, 
my dear spouse his and my picture, which are all drawn to the knees. But 
the head of Sir John, my spouse, that I left behind me at Shute I give 
unto Carolus Pole. My own father's picture to Sir William Pole. To my 
niece Moyle my diamond ear rings that have three diamond drops hanging 
at them &c. I make my second son Carolus Pole my sole executor, he to 
bury me privately and decently by my dear spouse and to carry my body 
directly to Colytou Church. 

Proved by Carolus Pole, L. B., son of the deceased &c. 

Aston, 57. 

Carolus Pole, clerk, rector of the parish church of St. Breock near 
Wadebridge Cornwall, 23 November 1729, proved 2 June 1731. To be 
buried in the parish church of Breock in the same grave with my late dear 
wife. The poor of St. Breock, and also of Shute and Monkton in Devon. 
My brother Sir William Pole. To my eldest son Reginald Pole (under 
eighteen years of age) my diamond ring which I desire he will keep for 
my sake as lour; as he lives, as I did for the sake of mv mother who save 
it me. To Reginald also my silver tea-kettle and lamp aud the stand 
thereto belonging (and other articles). My messuage &c. called Hexham 
in Shute which I hold in lease of Lord Petre. My son John and daughter. 
My endowing purse now in the custody of my In-other Philip Rashleigh 
Escp My gold striking watch. My brother Sir William Pole, Baronet, 
hath frequently declared and promised unto me that he intended and was 
fully resolved to settle all his lands and estate on my eldest son Reginald. 
I commit the guardianship, tuition and education of my said son unto my 
said brother, but if he should die before my son attain the age of one and 
twenty I give the guardianship &c. to my cousin Sir William drew, 
Baronet, and my brothers in law Philip and Jonathan Rashleigh Esquires. 
My said brother, cousin and brothers in law to be executors of this my last 
will and guardians of two younger children. Isham, 159. 



930 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Sir William Pole of Shute in Devon, Baronet, 6 May 1733, proved 18 
May 1742. To be buried with ray ancestors in the vault in Shute Church 
in a private manner. A handsome marble monument to my memory, with 
my arms and other proper decorations thereon, to be affixed to the wall 
over my vault (which is enclosed) with an inscription on such monument 
expressing my name and hereditary title, with the addition of Master of 
the Household to Queen Anne of Glorious Memory, and the time of my 
death and years of my age. And another marble monument to my 
memory, with such decorations and inscription as aforesaid shall likewise 
be affixed to the wall in my Aisle in Collyton Church, Devon. I give 
and bequeath to my dear wife Elizabeth, Lady Pole, formerly Elizabeth 
Warry, spinster, for whom I have and profess the utmost respect and 
affection (and to whom I was many years since lawfully married ac- 
cording to the rites and ceremonies of the Church of England, though for 
some particular reasons we did not think fit to publish the same) my purse 
in which I usually keep Queen Ann's guineas &c. and my purse in which I 
keep what I call double guineas, that is to say, guineas with the impression 
of King William the Third and Queen Mary upon them, and the coins 
therein. To my daughter Elizabeth Pole, by me on the body of my said 
beloved wife begotten, the purse in which I usually keep my large gold coin 
and all the five pound pieces, five moidore pieces, three pound twelve pieces, 
six and thirty shilling pieces and other coin and money therein. To my 
said wife, for life, my mansion house, with the gardens, orchards &c. in the 
town of Collyton. To her also all the furniture of and in the room in my 
house at Shute where she usually lies, and of the closet thereunto belonging. 
To my said daughter Elizabeth the picture of her mother, my said wife, 
the drapery of which is blue. I devise all my manors, lordships, messuages, 
bartons, farms, lands, tenements and hereditaments &c. unto the Hon. John 
Poulet Esq., commonly called Lord Hinton, eldest sou and heir apparent 
of the Right Hon. John, Earl Poulet, Sir John Trevelyan, Bar 1 ., George 
Trevelyan Esq. and Robert Stuckey Esq., their executors, adminstrators 
and assigns, upon trust &c. My eldest son John Pole. (Then follow long 
provisions for entailing the property). My nephew Reginald Pole. Then 

my nephew John Pole. Then Pole who is now living and is the 

second son of my kinsman William Poole of the Kingdom of Ireland Esq. 

Then Pole, now living, the third son of my said kinsman William 

Pole. Then Pole, now living, the eldest sou of my said kinsman 

William Pole. Next to my kinsman Nathaniel Pole of New England, 
lineally and regularly descended from Mr. Nathaniel Pole, brother to Sir 
John Pole and son to Sir William Pole, knight. Next to Sir James Pole of 
Cheshire. Then to German Pole of Derbyshire Esq. If I have other sons 
and daughters. My said wife to be sole guardian of my son John and 
daughter Elizabeth and all other my child or children who shall be living 
at ruy decease. Trenley, 1G6. 

[For the above references I am indebted to my good friend S. A. Smith, Esq., 
M.D., who has a large knowledge of Devonshire families. The following 
will, which I gathered long ago, also refers to the family of our William Pole or 
Poole. Henry F. Waters. 

Who the " Nathaniel Pole of New England " named as kinsman by the testa- 
tor, Sir William Pole, in 1 7oii was, I do not know. The will states that he was 
" lineally and regularly descended from Mr. Nathaniel Pole, brother to Sir John 
Pole, and son to Sir William Pole, knight." I cannot learn that Sir William 
had a son Nathaniel ; but his son William came to New England and had a son 
Nathaniel. The testator evidently did not have a very precise knowledge of 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 931 

his relatives out of England, ami I think it probable that when he names " Mr. 
Nathaniel Pole brother to Sir John Pole" he intended Mr. William Pole, and 
possibly it may be so written in the original will. — Editor.] 

KATHERINE Northcote of Hoxton, Middlesex, widow, 11 March 
1683. proved 27 August 1G8.">. To my niece Pointingdon, relict of 
Thomas Pointingdon Esq. deceased, twenty shillings to buy her a ring. 
My kinswoman Mrs. Eleanor Smith. Mr. Thomas Row and John Row 
his half brother and Sarah Row his half sister. My kinsman Edmond 
Waldrond of Bovey in Seaton parish Esq. and his wife. My kinsman Mr. 
Ellis Bartlet of Branscombe parish, senior, and his wife. To my dear 
kinswoman Mrs. Jane Poole in Boston in New England five pounds if she 
be living, if not I give it unto her son Theophilus. Mr. Bolster living 
lately at or near Ufsculm, Devon. My loving friends Mr. Lewis Stucley 
of Exeter, Mr. George Crouch, Mr. Samivel Lee, Mr. John Collins, Mr. 
Terry, Mr. Partridge in Old Street London and Mr. Thomas Trescott, 
Mr. Atkins, Mr. Ilallott. Mr. Gillord, Mr. Iloppin, Mr. John Mortimer, 
Mr. John Knight and Mr. Hooper of Exon, and Mr. Collins and Mr. 
Moore of Autery St. Mary, Mr. John Searle of Plyinpton, Mr. Berry of 
Barnstaple in Devon, Mr. Amos Shorte of Lyme Regis in Dorset, Mr. 
Henry Berry, formerly of Crediton in Devon and now of Taunton in 
Somersetshire, Mr. Thomas Barnard of Lewes in Sussex. Mr. Robert 
Paunceforte, Mr. Nathaniel Overton and Mrs. Mary Dorney, widow relict 
of Mr. Henry Dorney deceased. I give unto Theophilus, younger son of 
Major Kaines, five pounds. To such poor as Mr. Samuel Lee of London, 
Major Kaynes and Mr. Perry shall think fit to distribute the same, five 
shillings. Dorothy the daughter of my nephew Mr. Lewis Northcote. 
Mrs Adams of Exeter. Thomas Mall her son and Mrs Rachel and Katherine 
Mall sisters of the said Thomas. Mrs Bridget Eveleigh of Exeter. Mrs 
Urith Waldron. Mrs Mary Row late wife of Mr. John Row deceased in 
Gray's Inn Lane near the Almhouses, London. Josiah Eveleigh, son of 
Mrs Bridget Eveleiiih. and her daughters Hannah and Elizabeth. Joshua 
Young sou of George Young of Ware's Down, Devon, gentleman. Thomas, 
John and William Row to be executors. Others mentioned. Cann, 112. 

[The l, Mrs. Jane Pole in Boston in NeAV England" whom Mrs. Northcote, 
the testatrix, mentions, was undoubtedly Jane, widow of William Pole, the 
Dorchester schoolmaster. — Editor.] 

John Beamis of Dedham. Essex, 23 April 1604, proved 28 June 1604. 
To Anne, now my dutiful and loving wife, fifty pounds. To Isaac my son 
one hundred pounds. To Luke and James, my sons, one hundred and forty 
pounds each. To my daughter Susan fifty and six pounds. To my daugh- 
ter Mary fifty pounds. To my two youngest sous, Joseph and Abraham, 
to either of them fifty pounds when they and either of them shall accom- 
plish the full age of one and twenty years. To my daughter Grymwood 
ten pounds and to her four children now living, to every one of them twenty 
shillings apiece. To Richard Smeeth of Bretneham, Suffolk, tweuty shil- 
lings. To the poor of the same parish forty shillings. To my brother 
Thomas Beamis five pounds and to every one of his children twenty shil- 
lings apiece To Jane Richmond of Beccles twenty shillings. To Robert 
Murton of Woodbridge twenty shillings. To William Murton of Hadley 
ten shillings. To the poor of Dedham forty shillings. All the rest of my 
goods unbequeathed shall be distributed equally between my wife and my 
two daughters Susan and Marv. I make Robert Ferman of Dedham ami 



932 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS EST ENGLAND. 

Edward Andrewes of Hadley my executors. And I appoint Mr. Richard 
Gooddaye of Ketle and Henry Sand ford of Dedham supervisors and for 
their pains to be taken herein I give them twenty shillings apiece. 

Proved by the oath of Humfrey Baldwin, notary public, attorney for 
Edward Andrewes one of the executors named in the will. ITarte, 66. 

The above Will is registered again and following it comes a Sententia 
pro Valore dated 3 December 1604, the parties in the case being Edward 
Andrewes, the executor, on the one part and Anne Beamis ah Spray, relict 
of the deceased, Isaac Beamis, Luke Beamis, James Beamis, Susanna 
Beamis ah Cowper, Mary Beamis ah Fowler, Abraham Beamis and Joseph 
Beamis, children of the deceased, on the other part. Harte, 96. 

William Thorne of Estdowne, Devon, 17 February 1637, proved 23 
November 1650. The poor of Estdowne, of Parracombe and of Bishops 
Nympton. Cousin Humfrey Gribble son of John Gribble. Others named. 
Bequests of five pounds each to several god children. All these legacies to 
be paid out of my lands aud '•demeanes" which I lately bought of one 
Mr. Mathew Allyn. To William Allyn my godson, son of Edward Allyn, 
four years after the decease of my executor, all my lands which I lately 
bought of Mathew Allyn, gen 4 , but my will is that if my executor do hap- 
pen to die before the foresaid lagacies abovesaid be paid what shall be un- 
paid at the time of her death to be paid out of my said lands &c. The 
residue to my loving mother Susan Thorne whom I make sole executor. 

Memorand. My will is that my mother whom I make executor shall 
dispose of my lands during her life and convey the same to whom she 
pleaseth for four years after her decease, and then after the said four years 
to remain to my godson William Allyn and to his heirs forever. 

Pembroke, 192. 



j i 



[I have little doubt that the Mr. Mathew Allyn here referred to as having sold 
lands to William Thorne was our Mr. Mathew Allyn of Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, and afterwards of Hartford and Windsor, Connecticut. He and (his 
kinsman) Thomas Allyn (or Allen) of Barnstable, Massachusetts, are frequently 
referred to in Lechford's Note-Book, and especially in connection with Devon- 
shire and west of England men. On page 41G of that Note-Book (as printed) 
Mr. Mathew Allyn (or Allen) is described as lately of Bramtom in com Devon, 
&c. I have no doubt by Bramtom is meant Braunton, near Barnstaple, Devon. 
East Down (Estdowne, as above) is very near both places. On page 418 of 
the Note-Book (as printed) appears Thomas Allyn (or Allen) of Barnstable, 
N. E., conveying to John Eells of Dorchester, N. E., one house and garden in 
Barnstable, Devon, and referring to father-in-law John Marke of Bramton iu 
Devon, and brother Richard Allen of Branton, aforesaid. Here then we may 
look for the English home of Matthew and Thomas Allyn. — Henry F. Waters.] 

Bennett Ward of Poplar in the parish of Stepney, Middlesex, widow, 
27 July 1742, proved 2 November 1742. To my loving brother Benjamin 
Appleby of New York in America, mariner, four score pounds sterling 
money. To Richard Ralph of the parish of St. Ann, taylor, aud John 
Taylor the elder of Poplar, house-carpenter, whom I hereby make execu- 
tors &c, four pounds four shillings apiece. The residue to my said brother 
Benjamin Appleb}'. But if he dies before me then all to the three children 
of him, my said brother, to wit, Benjamin, Jane and Esther, share and 
share alike. Trenley, 341. 

Declaration of Peter Evans, Register General for the Probate of Wills 
&c. in and for the Province of Pennsylvania and the Counties of Newcastle, 
Kent and Sussex, or Delaware, that the will of Andrew Hamilton of 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 033 

the City of Philadelphia Esq. was proved, approved and insinuated at 
Philadephia 13 August 1741. He refers to the marriage of his daughter 
Margaret with William Alleu of the same city, merchant. Have given her 
a lot of five hundred acres near the borders of Bucks Co., a lot in Phila- 
delphia adjacent to another lot formerly given to her by George Willox, 
another lot at Wicocoa on the River Delaware (and other land at Wicocoa), 
intended for a marriage portion. I give and devise all my hank and water 
lots, late the estate of Joshua Tittery, the messuage, lot and ground now in 
the tenure &c. of Stephen Benezet of Philadelphia, merchant, on Second 
Street, with lots in the square between Second Street, Third Street, Mul- 
berry Street and Sassafras Street (and other lauds) to my said daughter 
Margaret. A lot bounded West by Fourth Street aud South by Mulherry 
Street, purchased of the heirs of one Richards, I give to my grandson John 
Allen. Three lots bought of John and William Bullock to grandson 
Andrew Allen. My largest silver watch to my grandson James Alleu. 
The lot and messuage where I now dwell, certain lots on the West side of 
Third Street, a lot on Chestnut Street bought from the widow Carpenter, 
representative of one Townsend, lots on Chestnut Street opposite the State 
House, lots on Walnut Street (and other lands) to son James Hamilton. 
I have two lots, of five hundred acres each, near the borders of Bucks 
County. My sou James Hamilton to select one and the other I give to 
my son Andrew Hamilton. Other lands in Delaware and New Jersey to 
son James. I give and bequeath the gold box which I had with the seal 
of my freedom of the Corporation of t :e City of New York to my said sou 
James Hamilton. I give him my negroes Isaac the gardner, Nanny and 
her daughter Ciss and the negro boy Jeremiah. Over and above the ex- 
pences which I have been at in building and erecting storehouses and a 
wharf for my son Andrew, I give aud devise to him the plantation lying on 
Skuilkill River which I bought of Stephen Jackson. Other parcels of laud 
on Walnut Street, a track of land near Dunk's Ferry in Bucks Co., my 
plantation in Kent Co. upon Delaware, called White Hall, containing ahout 
nine hundred acres, to my son Andrew Hamilton. I give my negro woman 
Sue and her two youngest children to Elizaheth Walters who now lives 
with me. I direct that my executors shall give a ne<:ro girl to George 
Gale of Somerset County in the Province of Maryland, gen 1 , who married 
the daughter of Bridget Letherbury. I give all my plate to my sons James 
and Andrew, to be equally divided &c The residue of my real estate to 
my son James and the residue of my personal estate to my daughter 
Margaret and my sons James and Andrew. Signed &c. 31 July 1741. 

A codicil added 2 August 1741, for the settling lots &c. 

Admon. granted in London 8 December 1742, to Ferdinando John Paris 
Esq. the lawful Attorney of William Allen Esq., James Hamilton Esq. and 
Andrew Hamilton, executors &c. Trenley, 355. 

[Andrew Hamilton, said to have been born about 1G76 iu Scotland. His 
parentage is said to have been kept by him as a secret from his contemporaries, 
and at one time he went by the name of Trent. He first came to Virginia, and 
as steward of a plantation married the -widow of its owner, and by her influence 
began the practice of the law, and after his removal to Philadelphia became attor- 
ney-general and also speaker of the Assembly. His most noted achievement Avas 
his defence of John Peter Zeuger, the New York printer. He died in Phila- 
delphia, 4 August, 1741. His daughter Margaret married Chief Justice William 
Allen, and a granddaughter married John Penn, son of Richard, the last 
Proprietary Governor of Pennsylvania. — "W. K. Watkixs.] 



934 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Edwakd Hext of Charles Town, South Carolina, gen 1 , 6 October 1739. 
To the Vestry of the parish of St. Philip, Charles Town and their suc- 
cessors one thousand pounds in trust, for the relief c f poor and indigent 
people in the said parish. My executors &c. to hold fi teen hundred pounds 
in trust for the sole separate use and maintenance of my ni^ce Sarah Rut- 
lid^e without the let, control or consent of her husband, dr in£ her life and 
then for the use and maintenance of her child or childre i, remainder tc 
children or ch#ld of my kinsman John Hext of this Province. To Hugh 
Hext, son of the said John, at his age of twenty-one years, ray messuage 
&c. where I now live, on the Bay of Charles Town and so much land (as 
it is now divided from the Brick House and ground fronting Union Street) 

as belongs to the said Bay House; remainder to Hext son of my 

brother Thomas Hext. To my brother Thomas my Brick House, where 
Mr. Withers now lives, fronting Union Street, and the ground belonging, 
separated from the ground belonging to my other house on the Bay. To 
Hugh and Amias, the sons of my brother Amias Hext, my upper tract of 
land, containing six hundred and forty acres, on St. Helena Island. 

Item. I give, devise and bequeath unto and amongst the several children, 
that shall happen to be living at my decease, of my kinsman Philip Hext 
of Froome in Somersetshire in Great Britain, the father of Thomas Hext 
whom I brought with me in this province but lately deceased, all that my 
plantation or tract of laud at Ponpon containing eight hundred acres &c. 
&c. to be equally shared between them. To each of my four brothers, 
Francis, Alexander, David and Thomas Hext that shall survive me one 
hundred pounds as also to my sister Martha Bee one hundred pounds if she 
shall survive me. To her son William Bower, if he survives me, one 
thousand pounds and to her two daughters, Mary Bryan and Tabitha Peter 
five hundred pounds each if surviving me. I give and bequeath four 
thousand three hundred pounds unto the executors of the last will and testa- 
ment of my kinsman Paul Hamilton deceased, upon trust, to pay three 
hundred pounds for the use and behoof of Paul Hamilton the son of the 
said Paul Hamilton deceased, two thousand pounds for the use and behoof 
of Martha Hamilton, sister of the said Paul Hamilton jun r and one thousand 
pounds apiece to John and Archibald, the two younger sons of the said 
Paul Hamilton deceased. (The said Paul, John and Archibald not of age.) 
A conditional bequest to each child of my kinswoman Mary Bryan had by 
her late husband John Williamson deceased. The children of my kins- 
woman Tabitha Peter. Abraham Eddings one of the said children. The 
children of my sister Melior Godfrey deceased. The children of my kins- 
man John Hext of this province. The son or sons of my brother Thomas 
Hext. My brother David Hext's children. My kinswoman Elizabeth 
Etheridge of Great Britain sister of my late deceased dear kinswoman Ann 
Etheridge alias Prioleau, if she is to be found. Katherine, Philip, Elizabeth 
and Hannah, the four children of my deceased sister Katharine Still in Great 
Britain. My executors to be my two brothers David and Thomas Hext 
and my four kinsmen John Bee jun r . Jonathan Bryan, Philip Prioleau and 
John McCall, all of this province. To each of them one hundred pounds. 
Wit: Thomas Bolton, James Withers, Sam 1 Prioleau jun r , Thomas Lam- 
boll. 

A codicil, dated 22 April 17-10, bequeaths a tract of six hundred and 
forty ncres on the Southernmost end of St. Helena Island to niece Sarah 
Rutlidge. At date of the codicil Elizabeth Etheridge who had arrived in 
the province was then living with the testator. A bequest to her of six 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 935 

thousand pounds, instead of former bequest. To her also the five slaves in 
Charles Town, Ilagar, Sindah, Billy, Dick and Die, the use of the Bay 
House rent free &.c. A child bom to Johu Hext since the date of the will. 

Another codicil 28 April 1740. To Philip Prioleau four hundred 
pounds. To Mary Withers wife of James Withers fifty pounds. 

Proved at London 30 December 1742 by David Hext and John McCall, 
two of the executors, power reserved &c. Trenley, 357. 

[Edward Hext was evidently of that Somersetshire family of which a pedi- 
gree of the earlier generations is given in Somerset-hire Wills, Second Series, 
page 66, illustrating the wills of those of the name in the first part of the 
seventeenth century. An extensive pedigree of, the branch which settled in 
Cornwall is given iu the Visitation of Cornwall by Vivian. — W. K. Watkins.J 

John Taylor of Christ Church. Spittlefields. Middlesex, merchant, 10 
May 1742. proved 3 December 1742. To be buried in the ground com- 
monly called the Quakers in Buuhill Fields. To my loving daughter 
Margaret Higgison, late the wife of Gilbert Higgison, all that my estate in 
Cleathall, in the Co. of Hertford. 

And as to or concerning my estate I have or may have in Maryland in 
America I give, devise and bequeath the same unto ray said loving daughter 
Margaret Higgison &c. To my servant and friend Mary Wright fifty 
pounds. All the residue to my said daughter Margaret Higgison, whom I 
do constitute and appoint full and sole executrix. 

Proved by the oath of Margaret Higgison otherwise Higginson, widow, 
the daughter of the deceased &c. Trenley, 367. 

M d that the xviij th daye of this pnte moneth of June A dni 1587 being 
sondaye Elizabeth Grave widowe late wifFe of Richard Grave of Stort- 
ford in the Countie of Hertford being of good hole mynd & memory came to 
the howse of one Willm Barnard of the same Towne Scriven 1 and said unto 
him I entend very shortly to come unto you to haue my will drawen. for I 
meane that Edward Grave my son shall haue my stonding bed & fether 
bed. And John Eliott ray son shall haue my best bed next w th my best 
flockebed, And Richard Grave my son to haue my cadron, And Abrahm 
my son to haue my seconnd flock bed, And I will geue to them other 
thinges seu r ally, And then for that w ch shall remayne I intend to devide it 
betwene them iiij or alwayes John my son to haue the first choyce, And she 
said fTurther that her meaning was not, but that John her son & Richard 
her sou shold haue more or better pte of her goodes then the other two, 
And she said that some pte the w ch she wold geue to Edward shold not be 
remoued ffrom the howse because the howse was his, and this she spake in 
the hering of the said Willm Barnard. 

Itm a nother tynie she said that eu r y of her iiij sofies shold haue pte of that 
she had & that she spake in the hering of John Gates of Stortford yeoman. 

Itm the said Elizabeth Grave said a nother tyme in the hering of Alice 
Gates the wiffe of Johu Gates that Agnes the wiffe of Richard Grave shold 
haue her best gowne. 

Itm the said Elizabeth Grave the mornyng before she died being the 
xxviij daye of June she said that Angelles wiffe shold haue her Gowne then 
in making in the p r sence and hering of the said Alice Gates & the wiffe of 
Richard llarlowe. 

Commission issued (at Stortford) to Richard Grave 30 June 1587, to 
administer the goods &c. of the deceased according to the within written 
dispositions. Bundle of uncalendared wills 1587 

Com. of Loudon (Essex and Herts). 



936 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

John Pratt heretofore of Virginia, merchant, hut at present living in 
Manor Street, Chelsea, Middlesex, 12 February 1731, proved 22 July 
1731. My friends, Joseph Windham of London, lineudraper, William 
Hunt of London, merchant, Philip Perry of Loudon, merchant, and Capt. 
Roger Tublay of Chelsea, to be executors and to each of them fifty pounds. 
I stand possessed of one thousand pounds devised by my nephew William 
Pratt late of the Co. of Gloucester in Virginia, merchant, deceased, to his 
daughter Elizabeth Pratt. I will that it be paid and applied to her use as 
is directed by my said nephew Pratt's will. Other bequests to her. If she 
die before she attain the age of twenty one years then to Keith William 
Pratt, a son of my said nephew, now living with me, at his age of twenty 
four years; and if he also dies &c. then to my nephew James Pratt, now 
living with me, at his age of twenty four. My great bible to Keith William 
Pratt. My brother William Pratt and his wife Greswell living in the par- 
ish of Peterhead in the Shire of Aberdeen in North Britain. It is my 
earnest desire and will concerning the said Keith William Pratt that he be 
never bound to the Virginia trade either at home or bevond the sea. 

Isham, 193. 

Robert Lancaster of Bristol, chirurgeou, 3 January 1684, proved 13 
August 1685. To wife Anne all the estate that I had with her and all the 
right, title &c. in and to my messuage joining unto William Thruston upon 
the Key in Bristol and the Star Tavern upon the other side, wherein liveth 
Sam. Bandrum a cooper, also my part of a cargo in which I am concerned, 
with Mr. John Dudelston, mine being the fourth part. Reference to a 
debt contracted by her mother to one Freeman a lawyer. I give unto my 
wife also all my household goods and all debts or sums of money or money's 
worth due, owing or belonging unto me either in England or Virginia. To 
my two sisters, being widows, namely Anne Cooper and Rachel Parrett the 
rent of my messuage on the key wherein the widow Hedge now lives, they 
to pay to my cousin John Baker ten pounds (five pounds each). To my 
brother Edward my silver caudle cup which holds a quart &c. To my 
sister Mary Lewis three gold rings which I have now on my finger. My 
mother Anne Lancaster, widow, to be my executrix. 

The mother having renounced Admou. was granted to the widow. 

Cann, 111. 

John Saltonstall of the town of Barwick upon Tweed, "pensionner" 
(without date) proved 19 January 1590. I give and bequeath my houses 
and lands in Halifax unto my son Mark Saltonstall and to his heirs for 
ever. To my son Elias the house in the " Wester layne " wherein he now 
dwelleth, to him and his heirs for ever. I giva and bequeath my house in 
Barwicke wherein I now dwell unto my son Esdras &c. To my son Steven 
my house adjoining to the Briggate in Barwicke. To my four sons, Elias, 
ffarnando, Esdras and Steven, ten pounds apiece yearly during their natural 
lives, to be paid unto them within the town of Halifax only upon Mid- 
summer day by my executor. And as any of them do die so I will that 
their yearly portion shall die. To my sou Elias his boy and his daughter, 
to either of them twenty pounds, to be put to their uses by the advice of 
my supervisors. To my son Drurye's two daughters, to either of them 
twenty pounds. I will and ordain that my executor shall within two years 
next after my decease, and at the discretion of my good friends John 
Wattman, William Kinge and my brother Thomas Oldfelde, distribute and 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 937 

pay three score pounds sterling unto and amongst such honest persons or 
their most needful children and wives within Halifax vicaridge as I did owe 
anything unto wheu I did leave that country, notwithstanding that I did 
agree with them. " And whereas my cozen Gilbert Saltonstoll hathe a 
bill of mine it is well payde and discharged by twoe horses he had of mine, 
with theire furniture, the one half thereof, and thother halfe thereof I did 
pave and satisfye to one Newman that maiyed my cozen Grace Saltonstoll 
who came to me to Barwicke." I will that Sir John Selby shall have ten 
pounds deducted of his reckoning and I heartily pray his Worship that he 
will pay that great sum of money which I have laid forth to the honest 
poor men his poor porters, which I have " lyne " long forth of, to his great 
credit and to my great loss and hindrances, and as I have " bene " both 
trusty and friendly to my power in all his causes and service so I pray his 
Worship to stand good friend to my executor. I give to Gilbert Storye 
and James Wadye, either of them, one doublet and live shillings in money. 
I give to Sir John Selbye one old riall. I will that my executor shall pro- 
vide one fair carpet of broad cloth of decent color for the Communion table 
of this town, to be used upon the Sabbath days. I make my sou Mark my 
sole executor, and I ordain and make supervisors Sir John Selby, knight, 
Robert Jackson, alderman, my brother William Saltonstoll, Henry Bell, 
John Parker. And also I ordain and it is my will that if any of my four 
sons do show themselves obstinate or repugnant, aud that they will not be 
advised and follow my sou Mark and Drewrye's counsell that then all of 
them that shall so " rone " contrary their counsell shall from that day forth 
have no annuity of their yearly ten pounds paid any further by my executor 
but he shall be fully discharged thereof forever, "ffor I feare me that they 
will not followe my said twoe sonnes counsell that never woulde followe 
mine." To the poor in Barwicke three pounds, to the poor in Tweedmouth 
and the Spittle forty shillings, to the poor in Norham twenty shillings. I 
give unto Sir William Reade my golden ear pick. To my four last super- 
visors, every of them an angel. Saiuberbe, 4. 

Richard Saltonstall the elder citizen and alderman of London (day 
and month blank) 1597, proved 19 May 1601. All my goods &c. shall 
be divided into three equal and indifferent parts, whereof one third part I 
give and bequeath unto Susanna my well beloved wife, and that to be in 
full satisfaction of all such part and portion as the same Susanna my wife 
should or ought to have after the laudable use and custom of the City of 
London. Out of another third I give unto my daughter Martha one thou- 
sand pounds and the rest to aud amongst my sous, advanced or not advanced 
at the time of my death. The rest of my goods &c. I reserve to myself for 
the performance of the legacies and bequests hereafter by me given and be- 
queathed. To the poor of St. Thomas Hospital five pounds, of St. Bar- 
tholomews Hospital five pounds and the poor children of Christ Hospital 
five pounds. To thirty poor men which shall attend upon my body to my 
burial forty (?) gowns of the price of ten shillings the yard. To the Com- 
pany of Skinners in London ten pounds to be spent upon them in a dinner 
to be made at my burial day. To the Master Wardens & Commonalty 
of the same Company one hundred pounds (for loans to honest young men 
being merchant adventurers and free of said Company). To Samuel 
Saltonstall and every of my sons in law three pounds six shillings eight 
pence apiece to make every of them a ring of gold in the remembrance of 
me. Anne Harvie, my daughter, now the wife of John Harvie citizen and 



938 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

skinner of London, if she shall survive and overlive her said husband, shall 
have the use and occupying of two hundred pounds during her natural life 
without paying anything for the use thereof. And if she die and shall leave 
Richard Harvie her son surviving her then I give and bequeath the said 
sum to the said Richard. Otherwise it shall be divided amongst all mv 
children then living. To every of the children of my daughter Susanna 
Browne, now deceased, fifty pounds apiece, at such time as they shall 
severally come to the full ages of one and twenty years or the daughter be 
married. I do remit and forgive to William Browne my son in law 
those three score and ten pounds which he oweth me. To my nephews 
Richard Middleton and Thomas Middleton, the sons of my late daughter 
Hester Saltonstall deceased, late the wife of Thomas Myddletou, fifty 
pounds apiece at one and twenty. To Sara Saltonstall my daughter, now 
the wife of Thomas Wheeler, four hundred pounds. To Elizabeth Salton- 
stall my daughter, now the wife of Richard Wich, four hundred pounds. 
My wife Susanna shall have the education and bringing up of Edward my 
son &c. I give and bequeath to some godly and learned preacher ten 
shillings to make a sermon at my burial. Susanna my wife shaN have her 
dwelling in the great messuage wherein I do now dwell during her natural 
life, and the use of my household stuff in my great chamber in my now 
dwelling house iu London and in my great chamber in my house in the 
County of Essex. One hundred pounds to be distributed to the poor 
within the parish of Halifax, iu ready money or in penny loaves of good 
sweet and wholesome bread in remembrance of me the said Richard Salton- 
stall, alderman, and upon the necessary and needful reparations and orna- 
ments of the parish church of Halifax. The residue, one half to my wife 
the other half to my children. My wife and my son Samuel to be executors 
and my friends John Harvie, Thomas Middleton and Richard Wiche to be 
overseers. Woodhall, 32. 

Sententia diffinitiva pro confirmatione testamenti Domini Richardi Salton- 
stall, nuper Civitatis London, militis, defuncti, was pronounced die veneris 
secundo viz. die mensis Julij Anno Domini Millesimo Sexcentesimo Secundo 
inter horas nonam et uudecimam ante meridiem eiusdem diei etc. in a cause 
between Dame Susan Saltonstall and Samuel Saltonstall the executors &c. 
on the one part and Abigail Baker ah Saltonstall, a natural and lawful 
daughter of the deceased and all others interested &c. Montague, 51. 

Dame Susan Saltonstall of London, widow, late the wife of Sir 
Richard Saltonstall, knight, deceased, her will made 16 November 1G12, 
proved 23 February 1612. To be buried at South Ockendon Essex, at or 
near the place where my late husband was buried. I do require my 
executor not to use any pomp in giving blacks, or such like, but only to be 
at the charges of a banquet after my said burial, neither to cause or suffer 
my body to be opened or cut. I will that there shall be bought four yards 
of coarse cloth to lay upon my '• course," and immediately after my funeral 
to be given to some poor man. And I will also that the incumbent, for the 
lime being, of South Ockendon shall preach at my funeral, to whom I give 
for his pains twenty shillings. And 1 will that the first and second parts of 
the four and thirtieth Psalm shall be sung at my funeral. The poor of South 
Ockendon, of Barkeway, Herts, and of St. Dunstan's in the East, London. 
I give all my goods and chattels &c. to my sou Edward Saltonstall, whom 
J do make and ordain sole executor &c. Reference to an award made by 



soil 
Ad 
ari 



[:;. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IX ENGLAND. 939 

Thomas Middleton of Loudon Esq. (now knight) and others and a decree 
of the high court of Chancery made in the term of St. Michael in the fifth 
year of His Majesty's Reign. Money due to me from my son Sir Samuel 
Saltonstall, knight, and all money due out of the personal estate of my late 
husband, either by virtue of his last will or by the custom of the City of 
London or by the said award and decree, shall be equally divided between 
my sons Sir Peter Saltonstall, knight, and Edward Saltonstall. Hoping 
that the rest of my children will not account themselves forgotten by me 
for that I bequeath not unto each of them some remembrance by this my 
will, being disappointed by the hindrance that I have sustained through my 
said son Sir Samuel, I have remembered only those which I have thought 
to have most need of my help. Capell, 10. 

Matthew Kate of Eastcombe in the parish of East Greenwich Kent, 
gen 1 , 14 November 1610, proved 5 October 1612. To be buried in East 
Greenwich parish church in such decent sort as shall best please my wife 
and my cousin James Kay, which James Kay I do make executor &c. To my 
loving wife Frances a yearly rent of one hundred pounds to be issuing out of 
all my lands which I hold for any term or terms of years iu East Greenwich 
and Charleton, or elsewhere in Kent, for and during her natural life. I 
give her all the " arris " hanging in the best chamber whereiu I lie sick 
&c. Twenty pounds to be distributed amongst the poor by such persons 
as were distributors of the money given to the poor at my brother Arthur's 
death. To every of the four sons of my brother Arthur Kaye, that is to 
say, Arthur, Francis, Peter and Paul Kaye, one hundred and fifty pounds 
each at one and twenty. To my cousin Thomasin, daughter of my brother 
John Kaye, wife of William Readeing, one hundred pounds. To my cousin 
Dorothy, daughter of my foresaid brother Arthur Kaye, wife of John 
Fawkener, fifty pounds. To my cousin Elizabeth, one other of the daugh- 
ters of my said brother Arthur, wife ot Richard Bennet, one annuity of ten 
pounds by year, during the term of her natural life. My cousin Peter 
Kaye, son of my brother Edward Kaye, shall be bound apprentice in 
London and my executor shall provide and furnish him with all manner of 
apparell and linen fit for a " prentise " to wear at such time as he entereth 
into his master's service and shall give with him unto his master to whom 
he shall be bound the sum of thirty pounds. And I bequeath unto the said 
Peter Kaye fifty pounds to be paid unto him when the term of his appren- 
ticeship shall expire. To every of my now servants one year's wages. My 
servant Giles Ledgecrood. His father Giles Led^etjood the elder and Joane 
his wife. George Constantine of St. Alban's. John Brings of London 
and Ilumfrey Cawdell. My little boy John Wise. To my brother in law 
Ambrose Jenny for a kind remembrance of my love and favor towards him 
a ring of gold of three pounds price and to his wife Elizabeth, my wife's 
sister, a dozen gilt spoons of ten pounds price. To either of their two sons, 
Thomas and Henry Jenny, twenty pounds apiece at one and twenty years 
of age. To my kind friend Mr. Robert Jenny a like gold ring and to 
Mary his wife a dozen of gilt spoons &c. To either of their three sons, 
Robert, William and Francis Jenny, twenty marks at one and twenty &c. 
To my well beloved brother Robert Kaye of Woodsom in the Co. of York 
Esq. a gold ring of three pounds price and to my cousin John Kaye his son 
a like ring &c. To my cousin Anne, the said John's wife, a like ring. 
" And to my Cosen Grace Saltonstall my saide brother's daughter a like 
ring of goulde of like price to be paid within one yeare after my decease," 



910 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

which I desire every of them to accept in good part as a token of my love 
towards them. To my cousin John Carvile of Munmonktou (sic) in the 
Co. of York a like ring of gold and to my cousin Dorothy his wife, daughter 
of my said hrother Robert Kaye, a dozen of gilt spoons of ten pounds price 
as a remembrance of my special love towards her. To my brother Richard 
Kaye a like ring. To my brother George Kaye ten pounds, to be paid 
forty shillings every year in five years after my decease. To my loving 
friend Sir William Attlife a dozen of gilt spoons. My friends Henry 
Bowes and Thomas Nutton. I do make my foresaid cousiu James Kaye 
executor and my cousin John Carvile and my brother Ambrose Jenny 
supervisors. The residue to my said executor. Feuner, 77. 

Samuel Saltonstall, merchant and servant to the Right Honorable 
Company of Merchants trading to East India, 15 July 1616, proved 20 
February 1617. I desire my loving friend Mr. Thomas Mittford to take 
the pains to be my overseer. And I desire that all my moneys as I now 
have due unto me or hereafter shall be made of any of my goods may be 
delivered unto him, no way doubting of his care to see the said money well 
and truly paid and delivered into the hands of my loving wife Ann Salton- 
stall, who is now resident at Sir Henry Bellowes his house in the County 
of York, knight, whom I make full executrix of this my last will and 
testament. As a token of my love and remembrance I give unto Mr. 
Thomas Mitford a mother of pearl cup. 

Book 23 Com. of London (1616-1621) L. 137. 

Sm John Pettus of Norwich, knight, 10 January 1613, proved 13 May 
1614. To be buried in the church of St. Symon and Jude, Norwich, nigh 
to my father's grave. Towards the building of a porch at the North door 
of the said church, over my grandfather's grave, twenty marks. My son 
Thomas Pettus. Thomas Pettus my grandchild, son of Sir Augustine 
Pettus my son deceased, at twenty one. Dame Bridget my wife. My 
brother Thomas Pettus. My lease of house &c. in Loudon wherein my 
brother William Pettus dwelt at the time of his decease. John Pettus my 
godson, son of the said William, my brother, at two and twenty. 

Item, I do give and bequeath unto Bridgett Saltonstall my grandchild the 
sum of one hundred pounds and unto Susan Saltonstall my grandchild one hun- 
dred pounds and to Christian Saltonstall my grandchild one hundred pounds, 
to be jiaid unto them at their several ages of eighteen years or days of mar- 
riage, which shall first happen. My cousin Thomas Potter and Anne his 
wife shall have the use of the corner messuage in the parish of St. Symon 
and Jude, late my uncle Richard Swit'te's, after my decease, for the term of 
seven years, upon condition that he shall pay unto John Pettus my godson, 
son of my brother Thomas, yearly, at the said corner messuage, eight 
pounds. I bequeath unto my brother Thomas Pettus, my sister Whall, my 
sister Joanes, the late wife of my brother William, deceased, my sister in 
law Mrs. Reeve, Mr. George Downing, my brother in law Robert Debny 
(and others named) a nest of cups or bowls of silver of ten pounds price, 
with a superscription, In memoricuu Johannis Pettus militis. Cousin Stile, 
cousin Myles, cousin Richard Dethicke, and William Blackhead's wife. To 
my son in law Sir Peter Saltonstall knight one bason and ewer of silver 
double gilt, and one each to my sons in law Robert Knightley and Martyn 
Sedly. My niece Susan Pettus of London. My wife Dame Bridgett. 
My son Thomas Pettus to be sole executor and my son in law Martyn 
Sedley, my brother Robert Debney and my cousin Henry Pendleton to be 
supravisors. Lawe, 51. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 941 

Sen ten tia pro confirmatione was pronounced 4 November 1614 in a cause 
between Thomas Pettus. son of the deceased, and executor of the foregoing 
will, on the one part, and Dame Bridget Pettus, the relict, Dame Christian 
Sal tons tall, Ann Knightley and Bridget Sedley, daughters, and Thomas and 
John Pettus, grandsons of the deceased, on the other part. Lawe, 116 

Thomas Pettus of Caistree St. Edmunds, Norfolk, Esq. 14 October 
1618, proved 3 November 1618. To be buried in the church of Castre 
nigh unto the grave where my son John lieth. To my cousins Henry 
Pendleton and Susan his wife annuity out of my houses &c. in Norwich. 
Wife Anne if with child. My manor of Little Ellingham, Norfolk, and the 
advowson of the church of Little Ellinghami My nephew Thomas Pettus, 
son of Sir Augustine Pettus, knight, mv late brother deceased. Sir John 
Pettus, knight, my late father deceased. My brother Martin Syelie (or 
Syeley). My nephew John Pettus, son of my late brother Sir Augustine. 
My sisters Dame Christian Saltonstall the wife of Sir Peter Saltonstall, 
knight, and Bridget Sedley wife of Martin Sedley* Esq. Reference to the 
last will and testament of late father Sir John Pettus. To James Salton- 
stall, son of my sister Dame Christian Saltonstall, one hundred pounds aud 
unto Thomas Seeley (sic) son of my sister Bridget Seeley, one hundred 
pounds. Household stuff now remaining in the custody of Dame Bridget 
Pettus my mother at Rackeye. To Dame Christian Saltonstall one hun- 
dred pounds. To Anne Aldriche, my aunt, five pounds. Callibut Walpoole, 
my father in law. My uncle Thomas Pettus. My cousin Thomas Whall. 
To Robert Sedgwicke five pounds. 

Commission issued 7 July 1627 to Sir Henry Hungate, knight, husband 
of Anne Hungate ah Pettus deceased, while she lived relict and executrix 
of the deceased, to administer the goods &c. of the deceased, by the said 
Anne not yet fully administered. Meade, 115. 

[Thomas Pettus, the testator, was the son of Sir John Pettus of Norwich and 
Bridget, daughter of Augustin Curtis of Lincolnshire. His bi-other was Sir 
Augustin Pettus of Norwich; his sister Bridget married Martin Sedley of 
Morley, Norfolk ; Christian married Sir Peter Saltonstall ; Anne married Robert 
Knightley. The wife of the testator was Anne, daughter of Calibut Walpole of 
Norfolk. The will previous is that of his father? The Virginia family of 
Pettus claim a direct descent from this family through Col. Thomas Pettus, who 
settled in Jamestown, Va., in 1640. — W. K. Watkins.] 

Sir Richard Saltonstall of Southwokendon, Essex, knight, 30 
November 1G1H, proved 6 May 1619. First, as touching my wife, with 
whom I coupled myself in the fear of God, refusing all other, and linked 
myself unto her, living with her in the blessed estate of wedlock, by whom 
also, by the blessing of God, I have now three sons and one daughter, all 
living, viz 1 Richard, being my eldest, Susanne, Bernard and John, and 
albeit after my departure I doubt not but that God, according to his 
promise, will be unto her a husband, yea a patron, a father and her de- 
fender and will uot suffer her to lack if she trust, fear and serve him dili- 
gently, calling upon his Holy uame, yet forasmuch as God hath blessed me 
with worldly substance and she is my own flesh, and whoso provideth not 
for his denieth the faith aud is worse than an iufidel, I do therefore give 
and bequeath unto her, for the term of her natural life, my chief mansion 
house, called Groves, in the parish of Southwokendon, &c. &c. Certain 
lands I have assured to my son Richard Saltonstall at the time of his mar- 

* Undoubtedly the name above spelled Syelie (or Syeley) should be Sedley.— H. F. W. 



942 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

riage, and I have persuaded her, at my son Richard's marriage, to release 
part of her jointure &c. I bequeath unto her also one annual or yearly 
rent of two hundred jDOuuds, to be issuing out of my manor of Chipping 
Warden in the Co. of Northampton during her natural life. To the said 
Dame Jane Saltoustall, my wife, certain household stuff and movables. 
All which I give to my son Richard after her decease, together with my 
great bason and ewer of silver, all gilt and graven with my father's arms 
and my mother's thereupon engraven and " amelled," she being the sister 
of Sir Gabriel Pointes of North Wokenden, Essex, knight, which I would 
also have my sou Richard to leave to his eldest son after his decease, in 
remembrance of that worthy knight Sir Richard Saltonstall his grandfather 
deceased. And if he die without heir male of his body then my will is 
that my next son Bernarde Saltonstall shall have the same, with remainder 
to my third son John Saltonstall. To my son Bernard an annuity of three 
score pounds out of my manor of Chipping Warden &c. during his natural 
life and the life of such wife as he shall fortune marry. To my son Bernard 
five hundred pounds and to my son John five hundred pounds out of the 
thousand pounds due and payable by M r Samuel Clackson (sic) of London, 
merchant taylor. To John an annuity of three score pounds (as before). 
Reference to an indenture of 6 June 1617 between me and Samuel Clark- 
son of London, merchant taylor. My sons to prefer their heir males before 
the females and not to suffer any of my lands to come unto my daughters. 
And for default of heir males of the body and bodies of my three sons then 
my will is that it go to the right heirs of my son Richard Saltonstall for 
ever unless he or they which shall be the last heir male of my sons shall 
think good to suffer those lands in the Co. of Essex which descended to 
me by the death of my father to remain to the next heir male of my 
brethren, which I do earnestly desire may so continue in the name of the 
Saltonstalls during the pleasure of Almighty God, with their continual 
thanks given to him for his good blessings bestowed upon them. To the 
Lady Jane Saltonstall my wife the wardship and marriage of the body and 
lands of my nephew Edward Riche, which I purchased of the Berries, with 
all such profits as I might lawfully take, he and his brother Richard Riche 
being now run away from me to their uncle Sir Peter Saltonstall, for 
which my said nephews I have disbursed in six or seaven years that they 
remained with me, both for apparell, meat, drink and schooling, at home 
and abroad, with a man to attend them, and given to the Berryes for their 
wardship, six hundred thirty six pounds one shilling and six pence, the 
which being allowed with my executors my will then is that they shall take 
the benefit of their own marriages. To the poor &c. To my wife's kins- 
woman Prudence Ager some blacks. To my brother Mr. Erancis Bernard 
some blacks &c. My wife to be sole executrix, and for overseers I do 
nominate and appoint Sir Richard Saltonstall my eldest son and my son in 
law William Poalett. Signed November 30, 1618. 

Commission issued 6 November 1647 to Sir Richard Saltonstall, knight, 
son &c. of the deceased, the widow and executrix having died before com- 
pleting her administration. Parker, 47. 

The last will and testament of the Lady (Jank) Saltonstall made by 
her 21 May 1619, proved 4 June 1619. To my son Barnard Saltonstall 
six score pounds to be paid him by my son Richard. To my son John 
Saltonstall six score pounds (as above). To my daughter Pawlen (sic) 
feve pounds to make her a ring. To my loving sister Prudence Winnall 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. i»43 

five pounds. To my servant Prudence Agar forty shillings. Other ser- 
vants. All the rest to my sou Richard Saltonstall whom I make sole 
executor. 

Proved by Sir Richard Saltonstall. Parker, G4. 

Robert Parker of London, merchant taylor, 1 January 1621, proved 
22 July 162.3. To be buried in the church of St. Antholins, London, where 
I now dwell, in the vault under the pulpit with William Craven, younger, 
my fellow servant, if I depart this life in Loudon; but if it he my fortune 
to depart this life in Staffordshire, where I was born, then to be buried in 
the parish church of Wallsall, by my father and my mother (I think they 
lie buried about the font) if it may conveniently be done. My brother 
Nicholas Parker of Great Bloxewich in Wallsall parish, Staffordshire, yeo- 
man. My brother John Parker of London, merchant taylor, and his wife, 
my sister, Mrs. Anne Parker. Her three sons, William, Richard and 
Robert Chilcott. My cousin Thomas Parker of Chinckford, Essex, hus- 
bandman. My cousin Edmond Parker of Great Bloxewich in Walsall, 
liusbandmau, his brother. His three sons, Nicholas, William and John 
Parker. My cousin Anne Parker their sister; she is married and dwelleth 
in London in Basingshall parish and her husband's name is William Ryall. 
Her sister, my cousin Elizabeth Parker; she dwelleth in London in St. 
Hellen's parish near Bishopsgate. Alice Parker, her sister ; she dwelleth 
with her father and mother in Great Bloxwich in Wallsall. I say thirty 
pounds amongst them three sisters. My cousin Joane Tudman, my uncle 
William Parker's daughter; she dwelleth at Ryshall in Davend in Wallsall 
parish in Staffordshire. My cousin Elizabeth Heywood and her children, 
sons and daughters, at home with her at Rishall and Thomas at the same 
place before mentioned. Her daughter Thomasine Cooke, my cousin ; she 
is married and dwelleth in St. Antholiu's parish by me. My cousin Mr. 
Samuel Clarkeson of London, merchant taylor. My cousin Mr, Josias 
Clarkeson and his two sisters Mary and Hellen. 

Item. I give and bequeath to my cousin the Lady Elizabeth Saltingstall 
five pounds of good and lawful money of England. Master Richard Francis 
of London, merchant taylor and his man George Carkson (Clarkson) my 
cousin. His father Mr. John Clarkson of Walsall in Staffordshire, my 
cousin. Mr. Robert Stone of London, my countryman. Mr. William 
Millbourne of Loudon, merchant taylor, and his son John Millborne. 
Others named. Sundry bequests to the poor. My executors to be my 
loving brother Nicholas Parker of Great Bloxwich, yeoman, and my loving 
brother John Parker of London, merchant taylor. My two overseers to be 
my cousins Thomas Parker of Chinckford, Essex, and Edmond Parker, his 
brother, of Great Bloxwich in Staffordshire. To all the parishioners of St. 
Antholin's, where I dwell, thirty pounds to make them a dinner, and some 
of my kindred and friends, at my house in Watling Street at the sign of 
the " Sonne," where I dwell. If I die in Staffordshire then such a dinner 
in the guildhall in Wallsall for my neighbors, friends and kindred there. 
Forty shillings apiece to all my godsons and god daughters, namely, Henry 
Feild, son of Henry Feild deceased, merchant taylor, John Robinson the 
son of Mr Edward Robinson, merchant taylor of London, Elizabeth Allam 
daughter of Thomas Allam of Loudon, clothworker, Anne Ryall daughter 
of my cousin Anne Parker of London. I give to my brother Nicholas 
Parker of Great Bloxwich &c. my great ring of gold, graven with a knot 
and two letters W: P :, for a retnembrancj of my brother William Parker, 



914 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

for he gave it me in his will. To my cousin Mr. Samuel Clarkson of Lon- 
don, merchant taylor my other gold ring graven with the picture of death, 
with R and P upon the seal end. and within a remembrance of his sister Mrs 
Thomasine Francis the wife of Mr. Richard Francis of London, merchant 
taylor; but my brother John Parker gave it me to wear for my cousin's 
sake. To a hundred boys of Christ Hospital to come and sing Psalms at 
my burial, if it be in London, twelve pence apiece in money and to every 
one of them a two penny white loaf of bread to be provided for them. My 
cousin Mrs. Margaret Perry and her children and my cousin Elizabeth 
Clarkson that dwelleth with them ; they dwell in Coleman Street over 
against the Bell. Provision for the support of the organ player in Wallsall 
church and of his man that bloweth the bellows, to be paid by the Company 
of Merchant taylors. And my will and mind is that I would have the 
organs in Wallsall church played on every Sunday, both in the forenoon 
and in the afternoon and every holiday likewise, both forenoon and after- 
noon, forever by a skillful man that can play well. And I hope it will 
please both God and man, woman and child, for seeing they were prepared 
by our forefathers it is a great pity that they should not be played on. Be- 
quests to my Lady Craven, widow, her daughters Mrs. Elizabeth Craven 
and Mrs. Mary Craven, and her sons Mr. William Craven, Mr. John 
Craven and Mr. Thomas Craven, for a remembrance of their old servant 
Robert Parker. To Jane Whitmore, my fellow servant, and her sister 
Elizabeth Whitmore, my Lady Craven's maids. 

Proved, as above by John Parker, power reserved for Nicholas Parker; 
and probate granted to the latter 16 March 1626. Clarke, 76. 

Thomas Parker of Chinckford Essex, yeoman, 27 June 1625, proved 
20 August 1625. My cousins Master John Parker and Master Robert 
Parker of London, merchant taylors. My brother Edward Parker of 
Great Bloxwich in the Co. of Stafford. My cousin Nicholas Parker of 
Great Bloxwich. My brother Edmond Parker of Great Bloxwich his 
three sons and his three daughters. My cousin Thomazine Cooke the wife 
of John Cooke of London merchant taylor. Jane Whitcroft and her two 
childrpu. My cousin Anne Riall, one of my brother Edmund Parker's 
daughters. My cousin Elizabeth Heywood the wife of Thomas Heywood 
of I'ush^H. My godchildren and my wife's. I make my loving cousins 
Master John Parker and Master Robert Parker of London, merchant tay- 
lors, executors. 

Robert Stone and John Cooke wituesses. 

B. 24 Com. of London (1621-1626), L. 473. 

John Parker, citizen and merchant taylor of London, his will begun 
the 3 d of August 1620, continued the beginning of August 1622 and again 
the 3' 1 of August 1625, signed 8 August 1625, with a codicil dated 12 Feb- 
ruary 1626, proved 5 April 1627. To be buried in the church of St. An- 
drew Undershaft in London where my late brother William Parker and my 
predecessor Mr. Robert Comyn als Chilcotte and my late master Sir Wil- 
liam Craven are buried, and I suppose that my wife hath a purpose also to 
be buried there. My wife Ann shall have her customary part of my estate 
according to the Custom of this City, and if it shall please God to send me 
any child or children such child or children shall likewise have their cus- 
tomary farts according to the equity, right and custom of this City of Lon- 
don wherein I live. The inhabitants of the parish of St. Antholins in 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 04J 

London where mv younger brother Robert Parker and I have a house and 
sliop left us by our late master Sir William Craven during our lives. My 
late brother William Parker, deceased, did by his last will bequeath unto 
my brother Nicholas live hundred pounds, of which there remains in my 
custody, by the desire of my said brother Nicholas, two hundred pounds 
until he have occasion to employ it and for which I do allow him considera- 
tion although he desire it not. And he hath a bill of mine for four hundred 
pounds, made some three or four years past when I had so much money of 
his in my custody, and the said bill he supposeth to be lost or " invegelled 
awaie" from him by some dishonest person, and therefore by his acquit- 
tances to me doth testify the same and also doth, testify that he hath re- 
ceived all the money contained in the said bill except only the said two 
hundred pounds. Now, forasmuch as my said brother Nicholas Parker is 
a very a^ed man, having neither wife nor child, and is very well minded 
both to give and to lend so far as his power extendeth, and sometimes 
lendeth where he cannot receive again, for which cause I suppose that our 
late brother, deceased, did moderate his legacy, accordingly, remembering 
the old proverb which is that enough is as good as a feast, for discretion is 
a good companion to go with natural affection, my said brother Nicholas 
Parker having lived in the country all his days, thanks be to God in good 
credit amongst his neighbors, and hath ever been willing and ready to do 
good according to his ability, and his bringing up hath not " byne " to man- 
age matters of great value, but, to come unto my purpose, my will 

and desire is &c. &c. As concerning such legacy as I myself do intend 
towards my said brother Nicholas, I do, in my own poor opinion, suppose 
it better that he should receive some annuity which may plentifully supply 
him rather than that he should be fitted and furnished with any needless 
sum of present money, either to lay out upon unprofitable bargains or to 
lend to such borrowers as are not willing to pay again. Then follows a 
long recital of business dealings concerning the manor of Langthorne in 
Yorkshire. I one of the executors of my predecessor Mr. Robert Chilcot. 
At this day all the debts are paid and so are all the legacies except a part 
to myself in the right of my wife and a part unto the two youngest children 
of my brother in law Mr. Richard Spurweye and a part unto four of the 
youngest children of my brother in law Mr. Richard Prowse. And as con- 
cerning such portions and legacies as are due and belonging to my wife's 
three sons, William, Richard and Robert Chilcot, I do acknowledge myself 
to be answerable for them. My said brother in law Mr. Richard Prowse 
is more curious concerning his acquittance than all others are. Reference 
to a bequest made by M 1 Chilcot to the town of Tiverton in Devonshire 
for a school &c. My next heir, if it please not Almighty God to send me 
any child or children of my own, will be one of my brothers, first my eldest 
brother Nicholas, and, after his decease, my brother Robert Parker. The 
parish of Wallsall in the Co. of Stafford where I was born. To my brother 
Robert Parker of the City of London, merchant taylor &c. (against this is 
written 'he is departed this life"). My cousin Thomas Parker of Chinck- 
ford. His wife that now is (against this is written " she is dead "). The 
children of my cousin Edinond Parker of Bloxwich in Staffordshire. My 
^"usin Joane TicVnan which was the daughter of my uncle William Parker. 
My cousin Elizabeth Wood ah Ileywood which was the daughter of my 
aunt Airnes Goodman. Her children, two of them in London, viz' Tyma- 
zen dwelling with my Lady Craven and Thomas Haywood dwelling with 
me. My cousin Mr. Samuel Clarkson, merchant taylor of this city. My 



946 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

cousin Mr. Richard Frances of this City, merchant taylor. My cousin 
John Clarkson of Wallsall and his son George Clarkson who is servant un- 
to my said cousin M r Richard Frances. My cousin William Clarkson's 
children. My cousin Mrs Margaret Perry the daughter of my cousin Mr. 
William Wilkes late of this city deceased, and the children of my said 
cousin Margaret Perry (in the margin is written "my cosen M ns Perry is 
deceased therefore lett her sonne w ch should haue bene my servant haue 
her tenne poundes"). 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my cousin Sir Richard Saltonstall, knight, 
a ring of gold of the value of forty shillings aud to my cousin his bedfellow, 
Dame Elizabeth Saltonstall, another ring of gold, of the like value, and 
also the sum of fifty pounds. My sister in law Mrs. Elizabeth Sowch of 
Rygate. My brother in law Mr. Edward Ilopegood and his wife that now 
is. My wife's two brethren Mr. Andrew Cade and Mr. Symond Cade of 
London. Walter Cade (their nephew). My sister in law Mrs. Joane Slee 
widow, my cousin M r Roger Slee and his wife, my cousin Mr. John Berry 
and his wife, my cousin Mr. William Ilame and his wife and my cousin 
Mr. William Slee and his wife. My cousin Mr. John Clarkson of Wallsall 
School in Staffordshire and his wife. 

In August 1625 he refers to his brother Robert as having departed this 
life. My cousin John Cooke. Joshuah Cooke. Skynner, 38. 

Then follows the last will and testament of John Parker, of Loudon 
merchant taylor, as executor of the last will &c. of the Right Rev d Father 
in God Lancelot Andrewes late Lord Bishop of Winchester deceased. 
Reference to his kinsmen the Right Worshipful Roger Andrewes D.D., 
Master of Jesus Coll. in Cambridge, his two sisters Mary Burrell and 
Martha Salmon, Roberge Lee and her two sons, William Andrewes, son of 
his brother Nicholas deceased, the children of his brother Thomas Andrewes 
deceased, viz. Thomas, Nicholas, Roger, Anne, now married to Mr. Arthur 
Willaston, and Mary, the children of his sister Mary Burrell, Andrew, 
John, Samuel, Joseph, James, Launcelot, Mary Rooke and Martha, the 
children of his sister Martha Salmon, viz' Thomas Prinsepp (by her former 
husband Robert Prinsepp) Peter Salmon, Thomas Salmon, Martha Sal- 
mon and Amie Best, his cousin Hockett aud her five children (two sons 
aud three daughters), his cousin Sandbrooke, his cousin Robert Andrewes, 
bis cousin Rebecca, his father's half sister Joue (her first husband's name 
was Bousie) and her two children. Others. This will is dated lo Feb- 
ruary 162G and proved 5 April 1627. Skynner, 39. 






Barnard Saltonstall of South Ockendon, Essex, 20 September 1630, 
proved 31 March 1632. To the poor of South Ockendon five pounds. To 
the poor of Chipping warden live pounds. To my sister Powlett ten 
pounds. To my cousin Jane Poulett twenty pounds. To my cousin Susan 
Poulett ten pounds. To my god daughter Anne Poulett a hundred pounds, 
to be put forth for her use presently after my death. To all the rest of my 
godchildren live pounds apiece. To my cousin Prudence Agard twenty 
pounds. To my cousin Ric: Saltonstall twenty pounds. To my cousin 
Elizabeth Saltonstall twenty pounds. To my cousin Anne Saltonstall ten 
pounds. To my cousin Bridget Saltonstall twenty pounds. I make my 
brother Sir Ric: Saltonstall overseer and for his pains and care therein I 
do bestow upon h'un my silver bason and ewer and also my young gray 
gelding. My brother John Saltonstall to be executor and for executin<r of 



GKNKALOGICAL GLEANINGS IX ENGLAND. ( J47 

the same I give ami bequeath unto him five hundred pounds which is to be 
paid to me by the executors of one Samuel Clarkesonne of London, mer- 
chant taylor, within one year after his decease. Audley, 33. 

Mouse Martii Anno Dni iuxta &c. 1647, nono die, emauavit comissio 
•Tudithe Saltonstall relce Samuel is Saltonstall nug goe Sci Clements in 
East Cheape London defunct heStis etc. ad administranct bona iura et credita 
doi def de bene &c iurat. Admon. Act Book (1648), L. 32. 

Elizabeth Parkins widow, late wife of George Parkins gen', deceased, 
4 September 1644, proved 14 June 1653. Preference to an indenture 
dated 12 December 14 Charles and another dated 19 July 15 Charles, be- 
tween Roger Nott, citizen and merchant taylor of London and the said 
Elizabeth Parkins (then by the name of Elizabeth Sewster). George 
Sewster, gen 1 , first husband of me the said Elizabeth. Samuel Sewster our 
eldest sou. Charles Sewster my youngest sou living. Wye Saltonstall 
Esq. and Henry Saltonstall my natural brothers. My brother Charles 
Saltonstall gen 1 . Some trouble with Roger Nott about an estate (of first 
husband's) in Wiltshire worth three thousand pounds or thereabouts. 

Brent, 336. 

Dorothy Saltonstall, in the parish of St. Giles Middlesex, gentle- 
woman, 4 October 1658 (sic) proved 15 June 1658 (sic). My daughter in 
law Rosse's children. My son in law Thomas Saltonstall. Master Thomas 
Boteler the son of Mistress Elizabeth Boteler. Valentine Pell my godson. 
My god daughter Jane Sparrowe. My god daughter Dorothy Pepper. 
Others. My divident due and payable to me from the administrators of my 
brother Gregory Gunsell deceased. My nephew Francis Boteler and my 
son Thomas Saltonstall to be my executors. Pell, 329. 

Sir Peter Saltonstall of Barkeway, Herts, knight, 12 July 1651 
proved 24 June 1659. To be buried in the chancel of the parish church of 
Barkeway. My nephew Sir John Saltonstall. My grandchild Anne 
Chester. My nephew Captain Charles Saltonstall. The children of my 
brother Bond. My cousin Catherine Toakefield. Susan Rich daughter of 
my nephew Edward Rich. To my grandchild Robert Chester my mill in 
Barkeway (copyhold). My grandchild Robert Castell. My cousin Robert 
Charlton to be satisfied, the sum of one hundred and twenty pounds if he 
can make good proof that my son James Saltonstall was indebted so much 
unto him &c. My sous in law Sir Edward Chester, knight, and Robert 
Castell Esq. to be executors and my brother Edward Saltonstall overseer. 

Pell, 403. 

Mense Octobris 1661 vicesimo quinto die emauavit Como Richardo 
Saltonstall arm filio nrSli et ttimo Dni Rich! Saltonstall nug de Wrexham 
in Com Denbigh sed deceden apud Crayford in Com Cautii hentis &c Ad 
administrancl bona iura et erect dci def de bene &c Jurat. 

A. A. Book 1661, L. 99. 

Richard Saltonstall citizen and merchant taylor of London, 25 
August 1665, proved 16 October 1667. To be decently buried at the dis- 
cretion of my executor. First I will and appoint that all such just debts as I 
shall owe to any person or persons at the time of my decease shall be paid 



948 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

according to equity and good conscience. And, my funeral expeuces being 
discharged, I give and bequeath unto my dear father Richard Saltonstall 
Esq. and to my dear mother Mrs. Meriall Saltonstall ten pounds apiece to 
buy each of them mournings. I give to my brother Nathaniel Saltonstall 
and Elizabeth his wife ten pounds to buy them mournings. I give to my 
said brother Nathaniel the further sum of ten pounds for a legacy. I give 
to my brother in la.v Edward Moseley Esq. and to my sister Meriall his 
wife ten pounds to buy them mournings. I give to my brother in law 
Thomas Ilarley Esq. and to my sister Abigail his wife ten pounds to buy 
them mournings. I give to my brother in law Mr. Hercules Horsey and 
to my sister Elizabeth his wife ten pounds to buy them mournings. I give 
to my cousin Philip Gurdon, Doctor in Phisicke, five pounds to buy him 
mourning. I give to my partner Mr. Edward Turges and Rebecca his 
wife, if they shall be both living at the time of my decease, ten pounds to 
buy them mournings. But if either of them shall happen to die in my life 
time I give only five pounds to the survivor of them. To Mr. Thomas 
Agge and Elizabeth his wife ten pounds to buy them mournings. To Mr. 
Edward Goodwin, merchant, and Elizabeth his wife twenty shillings apiece 
to buy each of them a ring. To my cousin Anne Gurdon the daughter of 
my uncle John Gurdon Esq. and Amy Gurdon her sister twenty shillings 
apiece to buy each of them a ring. To my cousin Robert Ilarley, the only 
son of my said brother in law Thomas Ilarley, fifty pounds, to be paid him 
when he shall attain the age of one and twenty years (if he shall so long 
live). To said brother Hercules Horsey such gelding or mare as I shall 
have at the time of my decease, and the further sum of one hundred pounds 
in consideration of the pains he shall be at in the performance of this my 
last will and testament, of which I make and ordain him, the said Hercules 
Horsey, sole executor, being confident of his integrity in the execution 
thereof. The residue (after payment of debts and discharge of my funeral 
expences) I give and bequeath to and amongst the children which my said 
brother Nathaniel Saltonstall, my said brother Edward Moseley and my 
said brother Hercules Horsey now have or shall have by their present 
wives before named living at the time of my decease, to be equally divided 
amongst the same children, share and share alike, to be paid to the sons at 
their respective ages of one and twenty years and to the daughters at their 
respective ages of one and twenty years or respective days of marriage first 
happening. Carr, 138. 

Richard Saltonstall of Chipping Warden in the County of North- 
ampton Esq 1 ", 18 August 1688, proved 2 October 1688. To be buried in 
the vault 1 have made in the church of Chipping Warden aforesaid with as 
little trouhle and charges as conveniently may be. I give my daughter 
Elizabeth Saltonstall the sum of four thousand pounds, to be paid her by 
my executrix at her age of one and twenty years or time of her marriage, 
which shall first happen, so as she marry with her mother's consent, if 
living. I give my dear wife Margaret all my plate, her jewels and gold, 
my coach, chariot and furniture and horses and all my stock of cattle. I 
give my said wife the use of my goods and household stuff" during her 
natural life, to be his or hers afterwards, at her death, that shall be my heir 
at law. To my son Richard Saltonstall and to my daughter Silence his 
wife I give an hundred pounds apiece to buy them mourning. And, 
lastly, I do ordain, constitute and appoint my dearly beloved wife Margaret 
executrix &c. Extou, 142. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 949 

Elizabeth Smith of London, widow, 13 April 1G93, proved 26 June 
1694. To be buried in the parish church of St. Lawrence Jewry, London, 
near the place where my son was interred, without imbalming. Reference 
to last will of late sister Anne Adam deceased, bearing date 31 January 
1675. Laud called Adam Court in the parish of St. Peter the Poor, Lon- 
don. A messuage in St. Mary Woolchurch Haw in Walbrooke, London. 
My late brother in law Henry Monger deceased. Messuage, tenement or 
Inn called the Angel in Isledon als Islington Middlesex. William Antrobus 
lately deceased. Robert Antrobus, his eldest son, my godson. His five 
other children, Anne, Jane, Mary, Dorothy and William Antrobus. 
Thomas Goodwin and John West of London, sc'riveners, to sell and dispose 
of the Inn called the Angel and apply the money received for it towards 
the discharging of legacies &c. I bequeath, order and appoint unto the child 
or children, or, in default thereof, to the nearest relation by consanguinity 
to my lute honored nephew Richard Saltonstall Esq., deceased, one hundred 
pounds, uuto three of the children of Robert Antrobus, late citizen and 
merchant taylor of London, deceased, viz' Frances wife of Benjamin 
Whiston, Easter and Dorothy (now Dorothy Bradley widow) ninety pounds 
equally and to Barbara and Henry Antrobus, the two other children of the 
said Robert Antrobus, ten pounds equally, the interest to be paid to their 
mother during her natural life. To the two daughters of my cousin Stod- 
dard deceased five pounds apiece. Frances Antrobus widow of the afore- 
said Robert Antrobus. Jane Antrobus widow of the said William Antrobus. 
All the children of the said William Antrobus. Dorothy Pryor, widow, 
my late husband's daughter. Box, 140. 

April 1748. On the twenty first day Administration of the goods, chat- 
tels and credits of Mart Saltonstall late of Haverhill in the County of 
Essex and Province of Massachusetts Bav in New England, deceased, was 
granted to Eliakim Palmer Esq. the lawful attorney of Richard Saltonstall 
Esq., the lawful husband of the said deceased, for the use and benefit of the 
said Richard Saltonstall, now residing at Massachusetts Bay aforesaid, being 
firat sworn duly to administer. Admon. Act Book (1748). 

August 1749. On the fifth day administration of the goods &c. of Mary 
Saltonstall, late of Haverhill (as above) was granted to Benjamin Pember- 
ton Esq., the lawful attorney of Richard Saltonstall Esq. (as above), the 
letters of administration (of the same) heretofore, to wit, in the month of 
April 1748, granted to Eliakim Palmer Esq. (as above) ceased and expired 
by reason of the death of him the said Eliakim Palmer. 

A. A. Book, 1749. 

November 1769. On the twentieth day admon. of the goods &c. of 
Mary Saltonstall (as above) was granted to Thomas Jekyll Esq., the natural 
and lawful broCher and next of kin, having been first sworn duly to admin- 
ister, the letters of Admon. granted in the month of August 1747 (sic) to 
Benjamin Pemberton Esq., as the lawful attorney and for the use and 
I benefit of Richard Saltonstall Esq. the lawful husband of the said deceased, 

being first ceased and expired by reason of the death of the said Richard 
Saltonstall. A. A. B. 1769 (Registers). 

John Colman the elder, of Little Waldingfield, 19 December, 1505, 
proved 5 March 1505. To be buried in the church of Little Waldingfield 
"bifore the qwere dore." To the high altar, for tithings forgotten, six 



1)50 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

shillings eight pence. I will the day of ray burying there be " yeven " to 
every priest coming thereto four pence. And I will have Placebo, Dirige 
and Mass every day during thirty days next immediately after my death, 
with the priest and with those of the parish that can help to sing the said 
Dirige and service, the said priest to have for the said thirty days ten shil- 
lings and every other of the said persons five shillings for the said thirty 
days. I will that " ayenst my XXX day " there be given twenty pounds 
to divers towns next adjoining, the money in every town to be divided 
amongst priests aud clerks, poor men, women and children within the said 
towns and there to pray for my soul, "my fader and my moder soules & for 
all o r childern soules." Also I will that at my said XXX day there be given 
to every peer household within this town "brede & vitaill," and to every 
creature within the said houses one penny, praying for my soul and for the 
souls before " reherced." Also I will that all mine honest neighbors within 
the said town, at my said XXX day have a good dinner. " I bequeth 
to A preest to syng at Rome at scala celi " ten pounds, praying for my soul 
and for the souls before rehearsed. To the four orders of friars, that is to 
say, Sudbury, Clare, Babwell and the White friars in Norwich, to each ten 
shillings. I will have an honest priest to sing for me within the church of 
Little Waldingfield four years. I bequeath twenty pounds to buy a whole 
suit, that is to say, a cope, vestment, "deken and subdekyu " for the said 
church, and my name and my wife's to be set thereon. I bequeath four 
pouuds for to buy "a peyre Chalys" for the said church. To Katherine 
my wife my tenement in which I dwell, with the dyehouse &c. for the term 
of her life, provided if any of my children males fall to the occupation of 
clothmaking they shall have free liberty to set in the said dyehouse &c. 
Other property to said wife. Also I bequeath to her " all myn hostill- 
mentes and utensilles of household dtiryng her lift, and aftir hir deth to be 
devided amonges my ij sonnes." To Edward, my son, my tenement which 
I dwell in &c. &c. after my wife's death, and a tenement &c. which I 
bought of William Foorthe of Iladley (and other tenements), with remainder 
to son William, the rents and profits to be collected till Edward come 
to the age of twenty one years, therewith to find the said Edward to school 
and to find him sufficiently in all other things reasonable and necessary and 
keep the reparations sufficient. To William my son my tenement which 
was my brother Richard's, in Little Waldingfield, tenements purchased of 
William Foorthe &c. (and other tenements), with remainder to son Edward. 
And if they both happen to die without heirs male &c. I will that my said 
lands &c. "bequethen" to my said sons be sold at the best value and, of 
the money therefore coming, the " oon " half to be done and disposed in 
good and virtuous deeds, for the well of my soul and of the souls before 
rehearsed, and the other half to be divided amongst my wife and children. 
The remnant of my lands to my wife, during her life, and then to remain 
to one of my sons which is best disposed and " towardest." To Agnes my 
•laughter fifty marks, at day of marriage, and to Alice my daughter fifty 
marks, at day of marriage; and if either die before marriage I will that 
she that overliveth have her portion ; and if they both die then the said 
money to be divided betwixt my two sons, at twenty one. To every of 
mine other daughters which be married five pounds. To Robert Colman and 
Richard Colman, my "broder" Richard's sons, to " everyche " of them 
twenty shillings and to Katherine their sister thirteen shillings four pence. 
To my prentices & godchildren. I will there be a " suer chest ordeyned " 
with three locks, wherein I will that all my money that I have in my pos- 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 951 

session and that shall be received of my debtors be put in the said chest 
and taken out at such times as it shall be occupied for the performance of 
this niv last will and testament, the said chest to " stonde " at my super- 
visor's place and eaeli of mine executors to have a key in their keeping and 
they to be at the putting in and taking out. The residue to Katherine my 
wile, and I ordain as executors the said Katherine my wife, Thomas Mauser 
and John Gurdon my son in law, to each of whom, for their labor, forty 
shillings. I make Roger Martyn my supervisor. Adeane, 4. 

Anthony Rous of Badingham, Suffolk, gentleman, 22 November 
1554, proved 19 July 1555. To be buried in the chancel of parish church 
of St. John of Badingham. My executors to hold my manor of Bading- 
ham Flail &c. for eight years, paying yearly during that time to Elizabeth 
Fuller, wife of Thomas Fuller of Finbarrow, my mother, thirteen pounds 
six shillings eight pence, in recompense of her jointure made and granted 
to her by Renold Rous my late father. At the expiration of said term of 
eight years I give the said manor &c. to Mary my wife, to have aud to hold 
during her life, she paying yearly to my sou Reynold Rous twenty pounds. 
And after her decease (the said eight years being complete and ended) the 
said manor &c. shall remain to my said sou Reynold. Other lands to him, 
he to pay to my four sons, Edward, Thomas, John and Francis Rous, his 
brethren, fourty shillings each year during their natural lives. To my brother 
Arthur Rous forty shillings a year during his life. My daughter Prudence 
Rons. I will that if any article, clatise &c. in this my present testament 
and last will he u imperfect" in any point then it shall be made sufficient 
and perfect by Richard Forcett of London, gentleman, and Robert Gur- 
don of Little Waldingfield, my brother in law, gentleman. I appoint as 
executors the said Mary, my wife, the Right Worshipful Sir Edmund Rous, 
knight, the Right AVorshipful Mr. Michael Haare of Browsyard Esq., the 
foresaid Robert Gurdon, my brother in law, and Robert Thorpe of Brinde- 
ley, gentlemen, and I desire the Right Honorable and Worshipful Sir 
Nicholas Haare, knight, to be supervisor. More, 29. 

Robert Guudon of Assington in the diocese of Norwich within the 
County of Suffolk Esq. 3 April 1578, proved 12 May 1579. I give and 
bequeath unto Rose my well beloved wife one hundred pounds by the year, 
half yearly to be paid by John Gurdon my son &c. in full satisfaction and 
" contentacon " of all her right and title of dower &c. (and furniture and the 
use of certain rooms &c). To Elizabeth Waldgrave my daughter my lease 
(unexpired) of the parsonages of Much and Little Coggeshall, Essex. To 
her three children. Thomas, John and Elizabeth, twenty pounds apiece, to 
be paid unto my son Thomas Waldgrave their father &c. To my son John 
Gurdon the tenements &c. which I lately purchased of John Wincoll of 
Waldingfield, for term of life, with remainder to Brampton Gurdon, son of 
the said John, and lastly to my right heirs. To my sister Wincoll ten 
pounds. To Mary the wife of John Glamfield ten pounds. To Frances 
the wife of John Duke six pounds thirteen shillings and four pence. To 
Robert Lawrence five pounds. To Mr. Welche minister of Little Wald- 
ingfield live pounds. To 'Sir. Knewstub and Mr. Crokes and Mr. Byrde 
forty shillings each. To the poor in Assington and thereabouts twenty 
pounds within six years. To my daughter Appleton. for and to the behoof 
of her son Isaac Appleton, twenty marks. To Thomas Jervis my servant 






952 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

ten pounds. Other servants. The residue of my goods and chattells &c. to 
my son John Gurdou whom I do constitute, ordain and make sole executor. 

Bakon, 19. 

Elizabeth Barrett widow, late the wife of Edward Barrett Esq. de- 
ceased, her will made 27 May, 36 Elizabeth, proved 1 8 October 1 594. I com- 
mend my body to the earth to be reverently and comely buried in the vault 
in ivlveley church where my said late husband lieth. All my plate (and 
household stuff &c.) to be bestowed upon such persons and in such manner 
as in a " scedule " or inventory in writing under my hand I have disposed &c. 
To my sister Ann Borlace, widow, six silver fruit dishes of the value of 
twenty pounds, having the arms of my father graven upon them. The 
poor of Bray. The poor of Barbara in Suffolk. The poor of Codden- 
ham (and other places named). To my son Bacon and my good daughter 
his wife one hundred pounds to be made into sundry parcels of plate as it 
shall best like them. And further to Mrs. Patieuce now the wife of Mr. 
Churchame thirty pounds. To Philip Bacon, son of my daughter Helen 
twenty pounds, to Nathaniel Bacon, another of her sons, twenty pounds 
and to Jane Bacon, her daughter, six and twenty pounds thirteen shillings 
four pence to make her a bason and ewer of silver with it. To Elizabeth 
Gurden, daughter of my son Brampton Gurden Esq. fifty pounds to buy 
her a chain and some jewels, to Amy Gurden, another of his daughters, 
twenty pounds and to Judith Gurden, another, twenty pounds. John Cor- 
bett, son of my son in law Thomas Corbett Esq., and Elizabeth Corbett, 
my god daughter, his sister. My cousin and god daughter Mrs. Elizabeth 
Riche. My god daughter Elizabeth Amcottes. John Gilford, son of Mr. 
George Gifford. Provision for a free Grammar School in Alveley. 
Leases my late dear and blessed husband Mr. Barrett made unto John 
Borlace and Edward Bacon Esquires. The manor of Bumstedd's in Alveley, 
Essex. Ilumfrey Foster " then esquire and sithens made knight" who had 
married one of my said late husband's daughters. Ann Barrett daughter of 
Charles Barrett Esq. deceased. Walter Barrett one of the sons of the 
said Charles. Edward Barrett sou and heir of Charles Barrett deceased. 
My lease of Belhouse. Elizabeth Gifford daughter of Mr. Michael Gifford. 
My son in law Edward Bacon to be executor, he refusing then my son in 
law Brampton Gurden, and failing him then my son in law Thomas Corbet. 
My loving kinsman Robert Beale and my good and loving friends Johu 
Butler, Humfrey Michell and Francis Ratrie esquires to be overseers, to 
each of whom one spout pot of silver, of the value of six pounds thirteen 
shillings four peuce, having the arms Sir Robert Litton, knight, my father, 
graven upon them. 

Published and declared 27 May 1594 and finished and again published 
24 June 1594. 

Then follows the Inventory (of plate &c.) referred to in the will. To 
daughter Elizabeth Gurden my best silver bason and ewer, three white 
silver salts, two silver tankards, the great broad bowl with the cover suit- 
able unto the bowl, a silver chaffing dish, three great deep bowls with 
cover, three little deep bowls with cover, one dozen of spoons parcel gilt, 
one silver ladle, a "maudline cuppe " which I do commonly drink balm 
water in, three broad silver saucers and one lesser saucer of silver (and a 
lot of household stuff enumerated, among which great backed chairs, low 
backed chairs, wicker chairs, stools, court cupboards &c). To my daugh- 
ters Elizabeth (Gurden) and Ann (Corbet) twelve chests to be equally 
divided betwixt them. Then follows a list of articles given to Ann Corbet. 

Dixy, 71. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 953 

Apollo Playne of Preston, Suffolk, gentleman, 4 September 1601, 
proved 20 November 1602. My son William Plaine, married to a daughter 

of Robert of Roughannam, Suffolk, Esq. Mr. Thomas Willis 

minister of Preston. Margaret my wife and William my son to be execu- 
tors. To the poor of Lavenham forty shillings so that they trouble me not 
at the day of my burial. My executors to pay Amye Dickens, at her full 
age of one and twenty years, a hundred pounds and to the rest of the 
children of my daughter Dickens, namely, George, Margaret and Bryant, 
a hundred pounds to be evenly or equally distributed amongst them at their 
full age; and if they die before they come to those years then I will my 
daughter, their mother, shall have their portion, over living; but if she die, 
my executors. I give my son Dickens his debts due at my death, so he 
claim no other. Hollinshead's Dictionaries, which I paid forty shillings for, 
T bequeath to my cousin John Guidon Esq., praying him my son may have 
" Chawcer and Maister Lamberte's Perambulacon of Kent," makiug him 
overseer of my will. Montague, 74. 

Anthony Drury of Besthorpe, Norfolk, Esq. 20 June 1616, proved 9 
November 1616. My body to be buried in the South Aisle of the parish 
church of Besthorpe and my grave to be covered with the marble stone at 
my porch door, with a superscription in brass and two escutchions of brass 
with my arms and my two wives' arms engraven thereon. To my wife 
Ajne (among other things) the ambling gelding which I bought of one 
Buckenham and the household stuff of mine remaining in my son Sir 
Anthony Drury's house in Besthorpe. Sundry hangings &c. in my parlor at 
my manor of Curson's to my said son Sir Anthony. Sundry household stuff 
in my houses at Weston, Norfolk, to my son William. My daughter Bur- 
man and my grandchild Anne Burman (at eighteen). My daughter Rooke- 
wood. My grandchild Bridget Rookewood (at eighteen). Other of her 
children. My eldest son's daughters, viz 1 Anne, Bridget, Elizabeth, Susan 
and Dorothy, at twenty or marriage. My daughter Elizabeth Harborne 
and her children. My son Pleasant's children, viz 1 Thomas, William, Anne 
and Dorothy, at eighteen. To my grandchild William Drury my chain of 
gold, to be delivered to him at his full age of one and twenty years, and 
after my decease the said chain to be delivered to Dame Bridgett Drury 
my daughter to have the custody and use thereof. To my said daughter 
my gold ring with my arms thereupon. To my grandchild Anthony Drury 
all my lands in Lynge which I bought of Mr. Dennye. My grandchild 
Robert Drury. My sister Chamberlaine. My loving cousin Mr. Arch- 
deacon Stokes. To wife Anne, for life, all that chief messuage &c. wherein 
my eldest son lately dwelt, called Gyles, whereof by deed indented dated 18 
August 14Eliz: I did en feoff e Nicholas Garneis and William Brampton 
Esquires and Thomas Brampton gen 1 to certain uses &c. Provisions for 
descent of real estate. Son Sir Anthony Drury to be executor and if he 
shall not, within three months next after my decease, lawfully prove this 
my last will and testament according to the due course of the Ecclesiastical 
laws of this Realm then all ray gifts and devises of goods &c. to him shall 
cease and be utterly void and I give the same to my son William whom I 
make executor in his place. And lastly I do desire ray loving brother 
Nicholas Garneis Esq. and my loving sous in law William Harborne Esq. 
and Mr. Doctor Burman to be supervisors. And I do give and bequeath 
unto my loving cousin John Gurden Esq., according to a loving and kind 
agreement between him and me, if he be living at the time of my decease, 



954 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

one gelding or colt or else forty shillings in lieu thereof, desiring him to 
take my small remembrance in good part. And unto my said brother 
Garneis and my sons William Harborne and Doctor Burman and to my son 
William Drury and to my son Rookewood and to my grandchild William 
Drury and to my loving kinsman and godson Mr. Thomas Drury and to my 
loving cousin Thomas Brampton Esq. I give, to each of them, a mourning 
gown. And to the rest of my friends or kin that my executor shall please 
to bestow cloaks upon I will that my nephew Raphe Chamberlain and my 
brother Constable shall have each of them one. And so an end of this my 
last will and testament &c. 

Ro : Constable and William Rookewood two of the witnesses. Proved 
by Sir Anthony Drury, knight. Cope, 109. 

John Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Esq. 6 December 1621, proved 10 
October 1G23. In former will had made my son Brampton (Gurdon) ex- 
ecutor. I have, upon very just occasions which I have imparted unto some 
of our indifferent friends, changed my purpose therein. To my grandchild 
John Gurdon, eldest son of my said son Brampton Gurdon by his first wife, 
all my lease or farm lands, advowsons, tythes &c. in Assington, parcel of 
the late Priory of Hatfield Peverell, Essex, which I did purchase of Thomas 
Winterflood gen 1 , lands which I did purchase of Sir Edwin Riche, knight, 
the messuage or farm house wherein one Thomas French doth now inhabit, 
called Garland's, and lands belonging &c, which I did lately purchase of 
Sir William W'aldgrave, knight, the elder, situate in Assington, lands which 
[ bought of the children of Edward Hamond, now in the occupation of John 
Hamond fand a lot of other lands &c. described) ; and my will, intent and 
desire is, which I would earnestly entreat my son Brampton Gurdon, even 
as he would have the love and favor of Almighty God, that he would per- 
mit and suffer all those manors, lands and tenements &c. to go, remain and 
be in such manner and form and to such person or persons &c. and for such 
uses as are expressed &c. in certain indentures tripartite made between me 
fhe said John Gurdon and Amye my wife on the first part, Elizabeth 
Barret, widow, Sir Drue Drurye, knight, and others of the second part and 
the said Brampton Gurdon my son on the third part, bearing date 2 Feb- 
ruary 30 Eliz : Reference to an instrument bearing date 25 June 1G0G, 
made by the said Brampton Gurdon upon or a little before his intermarriage 
with a second wife &c. To my grandchild Robert Gurdon, brother unto 
my said grandchild John Gurdon of the whole blood, messuages &c. in 
Letton, Cranworth and Shipdam &c. in Norfolk, with remainder to Edward 
Gurdon, whole brother unto the said Robert. Sundry lands &c. to said 
grandson Edward Gurdon. To my cousin William Playne of Lavenham, 
Suffolk, gen 1 , thirty pounds and to his mother Margaret Playne, widow, 
forty shillings to make her a ring. To my grandchild Brampton whom my 
said son had by his second wife, Muriell the daughter of Martin Sydley 
Esq. deceased, certain household stuff at Letton, at his age of four and 
twenty or day of marriage. To the said Muriell, the now wife of ray said son, 
twenty pounds to buy her a gown. To the rest of my son Brampton Gurdon's 
children by the said Muriell (excepting Edmund) twenty pounds apiece at 
their several ages of twenty years. Certain household stuff conveyed to Wen- 
ham. Gifts to James Springet and to Alice his wife, before Alice Somerlatid, 
my late .servants. Other servants. I make the aforenamed John Gurdon 
my grandchild sole executor and give and bequeath unto him the overplus 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 955 

of my money &c, and I nominate and appoint Sir Henry Mildmaye, knight, 
to be supervisor, to whom ten pounds iu money and my best gelding or 
horse, at his own choice. Also I do appoint as a thing by me especially de- 
sired that my said grandchild John Gurdon will mako some especial monu- 
ment or remembrance in Assington Church, not only of myself but of my 
father, mother and wife, being his grandmother, such as he in his discretion 
shall think meet and fit for our estate, condition and calling as we lived in 
this world. I give unto Edmunde Gurdon my grandchild the copyhold in 
Milford, to be surrendered to his use, and ten pounds also for to pay his 
fine and eharges of court. 

John Appleton one of the witnesses. Proved by John Gurdon the 
grandson. Swann, 99. 

Sir Calthorpe Parker of Erwarton, Suffolk, knight, 31 August 1618, 
proved 26 January 1618. I give and bequeath unto Dame Mercye, my now 
wife, my capital messuage or mauor house of my manor of Erwarton, with 
the orchards, gardens, mills, dovehouses &c. to have and to hold until my 
eldest son shall accomplish his full age of one and twenty years. The 
manor of Gayues and other estate to be in the charge of the executors, a 
portion of the rent to be employed for the benefit of the younger children. 
The, three hundred pounds paid to Sir Stephen Soame to be employed for 
me in the East Indian Company I give, with the profits arising of the said 
Adventure, uuto my daughter Anne Parker, to be paid at her day of mar- 
riage or age of one and twenty years. Other bequests to daughters Anue 
and Mary Parker. To my sister Dame Katheriue Cornwallis fifty pounds. 

I do name and appoint my assured loving brothers in law Nathaniel 
Barnardistou Esquire, Thomas Soame of London Esquire and my trusty 
and assured friends, William Cage of Ipswich, Suffolk, geutlemen, and John 
Gaseley of Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk, yeoman, my true and lawful execu- 
tors. I do give aud bequeath unto Dame Mercye my wife my capital and 
new built messuage in Great Wenham, Suffolk, and lands, meadows, pas- 
tures and fennes in said town of Great Wenham or Capell to have and to 
hold during her natural life. Aud after her decease I give them to Stephen 
Parker my second son aud to his heirs forever. Parker, 1. 

Dame Mercie Parker of Great Weuham, Suffolk, widow, 2 July 1636, 
proved 9 December 1636. To Henry Parker my second son those lands 
messuages &c. which I bought of Richard Daye, situate in Capell or 
elsewhere in said county. To my son Nathaniel Parker that hundred 
pounds which is in the hands of my cousin Henry Austin, and forty pounds 
more to buy him a chamber. I give to my son Thomas Parker and his 
heirs all those lands, which I bought of James Hopkins late minister of 
Great Wenham, situate and lying in Capel &c. I give to my daughter 
Sultinstall and my daughter Gurdon my pair of gold bracelets, viz 1 to each 
of them one bracelet. I give to my said two daughters all my childbed linen 
to be equall} r divided betwixt them. Also I give six silver plate trenchers to 
my daughter Saltenstall. And my meaning is they shall afterwards go to 
such children as she shall appoint or think fit. A similar bequest to daugh- 
ter Gurdon. To my son. Sir Philip, a dozen silver plate trenchers. The 
rest of my plate &c. to my three younger sous. To my daughter Parker 
my coach and my red and green quilt. All my other household stuff to 
my son Sir Philip. To John Saltenstall my grandchild fifty pounds to be 



956 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

employed to his use, and that, with the profits arising, to be paid him at his 
age of one and twenty years. To my brothers Sir William, Sir Stephen 
and Mr. Thomas Somes, Sir John Wentworthe, Mr. John Gurdon my son 
in law, my sister Wentworth and my sister Barnardiston, to each of them a 
ring of the value often pounds. I give to Sir Ridhard Saltinstall a ring of 
the value of forty pounds. To the poor of Great Wenham forty shillings. 
To the poor of Thurrington forty shillings, To the poor of Weekes in 
Essex forty shillings. Certain servants and others. All the rest of my 
lands &c. to be equally divided amongst my three younger sons, Henry, 
Nathaniel and Thomas, whom I constitute &c. executors. 

Proved by Henry Parker, power reserved to grant letters to Nathaniel 
and Thomas Parker the other executors named. Pile, 123. 

John Choppyne fifth son of Francis Choppy ne of Coddenham, Suffolk, 
gent' deceased, will made 17 December 1644, proved 8 Jauuary 1647. My 
cousin Judith Choppyne. My cousin John Southwell Esq. My dear and 
loving mother Mrs. Dorothy Dove. Richard Tallemach of Coddenham, 
yeoman. My beloved nephew William Harrison, the son and only son of 
my late dear and loving sister, and my only sister, Dorothy Choppyne, the 
wife of William Harrison gen'. My beloved niece and god daughter Anne 
Choppyne, second daughter of my late dear brother Tellemache Choppyne 
gen 1 deceased. My beloved niece Frances Choppyne, eldest daughter of 
my said brother. My beloved nephew John Choppyne, the youngest son 
of my said brother, unto whom the Lady Susan Crane, in performance of 
my cousin Sir Robert Crane's promise, hath given the sum of ten pounds 
per annum, issuing out of the farm where I now dwell, for thirteen years, 
whereof there is two years passed. My beloved nephew Robert Choppyne, 
eldest sou and heir of my said brother. All these nephews and nieces at 
one and twenty or days of marriage. Now my humble bequest is that my 
loving friends and kinsmen John Gurdon Esq., one of the members of the 
House of Commons, Francis Bacon Esq., Counsellor at Law, and Matthias 
Candler als Gillet, minister of God's word at Coddenham aforesaid, will 
take care of the tuition and education of my said brother Tallemach Chop- 
pyne his four children and guardians for my said nephew Robert Choppyne 
during his and their minorities, of whose tender care I have had experience 
and am fully persuaded that they will to the uttermost of their endeavors 
give my said brother's four children both pious, religious and virtuous edu- 
cation, which will be more precious in God's eye than anything I can leave 
them. And I appoint my said loving kinsman John Gurdon Esq., Francis 
Bacon Esq. and Matthias Candler als Gillet, clerk, to be my executors. 

Essex, 11. 

B^amptoN Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Elsq., 19 October 1647, with 
a codicil dated 1 February 1648, proved 16 May 1650. My copyhold lands 
and tenements &c. in Great Wenham, East Bergholt, Roydon &c. in the 
Co. of Suffolk I bequeath to my eldest son John Gurdon &c. My copy- 
hold lands and tenements holden of the manor of Shipdam and lying or 
being in Shipdam and Letton, or in towns near adjoining, in the Co. of 
Norfolk, I give and bequeath unto my son Brampton Gurdon &c. I give 
and bequeath unto Merriell my dearly beloved wife my best coach and five 
horses, with all the harness and furniture belonging unto it, and all my 
plate marked with Sidleye's and Knevitt's coats, or either of them, one 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 957 

deep silver bason, one silver sugar box. a silver chaffing dish, three great 
and three lesser silver drinking bowls, two broad silver bowls, a silver foot 
with a screw, six silver plates with Gurdon's and Sidlye's coats, six silver 
saucers, a caudle cup with a cover, a little silver tankard, four silver por- 
ringers, four trencher salts, fifteen silver spoons and the bell salt. To said 
wife (a lot of furniture and household stuff, including) a livery cupboard 
with a drawer, a high Turkey wrought chair and a little Turkey wrought 
chair, high stools and high chairs &c, napkins and linen marked B. G. M. 
and G. and M. G., the chaffer bought whilst I lived at Greeneford, one 
barrel] churn &c. As for the pewter my will is that all the pewter stamped 
or marked with Bannett's (Barrett's?) and Litton's arms do go to my 
executor, my son John Gurdon, and the residue of the pewter be equally 
divided betwixt my said son and my wife. To my son Brampton Gurdon 
all the furniture and household stuff in his chamber and also one hundred 
pounds in lieu of a gift given unto him by mother Sedley (and also certain 
armor). To James Gurdon, the son of my son Robert, one hundred pounds 
to be disposed of for his best advantage by binding him out apprentice, or 
otherwise. To my daughter Mildmay one little gilt bowl and twenty 
pounds in money. My son John's wife. My son Hill and his wife. 

Item, I give to my son Saltonstall fifty pounds, and to his wife fifty 
pounds, to be paid within twelve months after my decease. My son Robert's 
wife. My son Brampton's wife. My nephews Nathaniel and Francis 
Bacon. Mr. Walker my minister, Mr. Pechy, Mr. Newcomen, Mr. Ray- 
meut. To Mr. Rogers of Ipswich in New England five pounds and to Mr. 
Stansby of Ipswich in this County two pounds. Mr. Edes. The poor of 
Assington, of Dedham, of Newton, of Sudbury and of Boxford. Certain 
servants. My son John to be sole executor and my loving nephews Na- 
thaniel and Francis Bacon to be supervisors, to each of whom I give five 
pounds. 

In the codicil he mentioned others. To my loving brother Martin Sed- 
ley Esq. forty shilling to buy him a ring. Mr. Smith of Dedham. The 
poor of Stoke by Nayland, of Bures St. Mary and of Nayland. Mr. Eaton 
now living with me. Isaac Cooke my servant. Susan Hudson my servant. 
Edmund Jesupp and An Rayment, both servants unto my son Brampton 
Gurdon. Reference to the marriage of Brampton Gurdon, my eldest son 
by Merriell my now wife, with Mary, his now wife. Pembroke, 68. 

Roger Hill of Poundisford, Somerset, Esq., Sergeant at Law, 6 March 
1664, proved 26 April 1667. My body to be buried and laid up till the 
day of refreshment come, in or near the grave or place where the corpse 
or body of her that in her life time was the constant delight of my eyes, 
my late most honored and dear wife Mrs Abigail Hill, daughter of Bramp- 
ton Gurden Esq. deceased, then of Assington Hall in the County of Suf- 
folk, was laid up and interred, it being in the Church of the Inner Temple, 
London, close under the East window on the South side of the said church, 
under the monuments of Coke and Littleton, in which place was buried 
Gurdon and Meriel, my son and daughter which I had by my said wife, as 
also Jane my eldest daughter which I had by my first and dearly beloved 
wife Mrs Katherine Hill, daughter of Giles Grene of Cross Castle in the 
County of Dorset Esq. deceased. And my will is that my burial be in as 
private a manner as may be without any vain pomp or ceremony at all and 
that blacks or mournings be given to none but to her that is the desire of 



958 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

my soul, my now most honored and dear wife, Mrs Abigail Hill (daughter 
of Thomas Barnes deceased, of Alboro Hatch in the County of Dorset* 
Esq. and sister and coheir of James Barnes Esq. deceased) and to mine and 
her children and servants that shall be iD covenant and abiding and menial 
servants with me at the time of my death. My late honored father Wil- 
liam Hill Esq. deceased. My son William. My son Roger. My cousin 
Chaplein of Taunton. My friend and kinsman Sir Walter Yonge of Colly- 
ton, Devon. Baronet, my brothers in law Brampton Gurdon of Letton, 
Norfolk, Esq. and Edward Keighley of Alboro-hatch, Essex, gen', and 
William Chaplein of Taunton, Somerset, gen 1 &c. My brother in law 
John Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Esq. My brother Richard Saltonstall 
Esq. My good brothers Mr John Hill of Taunton, gen 1 , and Mr Richard 
Royle of London gen 1 . My good sisters Mrs Anne Butler, Mrs Jane Royle 
and Mrs Jane Hill, wife of said brother Mr John Hill. My kinswoman 
Mrs Mary Gully, sister to my cousin William Chaplein aforesaid. My 
son Roger Hill. His mother in law my wife. Carr, 44. 

Brampton Gurdon the elder of Letton, Norfolk, gen 1 , 10 February 15 
Charles II, A.D. 1662, with a codicil bearing date 21 February 1662, 
proved 10 February 1669. To my wife Mrs Mary Gurdon all those my 
two messuages &c. in Letton, Cran worth and Shipdham, to have and to 
hold for life, and after her decease I give one to my son Thomas Gurdon, 
for life, reserving unto my son Brampton Gurdon &c. free liberty of in- 
gress, egress, &c. into and from my grove lying withiu the said premises. 
To my said son Thomas one thousand pounds. One hundred pounds to 
wife Mary (and use of certain household stuff during her widowhood). To 
my brother John Gurdon Esq. and Anne his wife, to my sister the Lady 
Mildmay, to my brother Mr. Sergeant Hill and Abigail his wife, to my 
brother Richard Saltonstall Esq. and Meriell his wife, to my sister Mrs 
Joyce Gurdon, to my nephew Mr. Roger Hill and to my niece Mrs Meryell 
Moseley forty shillings to each of them to buy rings. To the poor of Let- 
ton forty shillings, of Crauworth forty shillings, of Southberch twenty shil- 
lings and of Shipdham three pounds. To all my servants living with me 
at the time of my death (except Anne Foulsham and Francis Stanham) 
twenty shillings apiece, and to the said Anne aud Francis forty shillings 
apiece. The rest of my goods &c. to my son Brampton Gurdon whom I 
make executor &c. 

(Codicil) To my daughter Elizabeth Gurdon ten pounds. To my 
brother William Skeffington Esq., my sister Skeffington. my brother Ger- 
vase Pigott Esq., my nephew Mr. Johu Thornhagh, my niece Mrs Jane 
Thornhage and Mrs Margaret Goodwyne, to each of them forty shillings 
to buy rings. To M r Murke Lewes, Mr. Martyn and M 1 " 3 Martyn twenty 
shillings apiece, and to Mr. Thomas Walker of Assington and M r Stephen 
Poole of Soutlibergh five pounds apiece, and to the scholar that shall live 
with me in my house at the time of my death forty shillings. Item, I givt 
unto my dear sister Mrs Meriell Saltonstall ten pounds. Penn, 21. 

* For Dorset we should read E-sex. Thomas Barnes of Aldborough Hatch in Barking, 
Essex, by his second wife, Isabella, daughter of James Harvey, Esq., had, among other 
issue, Abigail, a sister and coheir of James Barnes, who was married four times. Her third 
husband was this Roger Hill of Poundsford, Somerset, and her fourth husband Col. George 
Thompson, brother of Robert and of Maurice Thompson, whose will, as also that of his 
brother Maurice, I have ready for publication. H, F. Waters. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 959 

Dame Amy bllLDMAl of Graces in Little Badilovv, Essex, widow, 18 
May 1 6G9, proved 28 January 1670. To be buried in Little Badduw 
chancel and laid in my sister's grave. To my beloved daughter in law 
Mary Mildmay, my son Henry's wife, six pounds in gold. To my grand- 
daughter Amy Mildmay, my son Henry's eldest daughter, one hundred 
pounds. To Anne Mildmay, my sou's second daughter, five pounds. To 
Mary Mildmay, my sou's third daughter, five pounds. To Lucy and Eliz- 
beth Mildmay, my son's fourth and fifth daughters, five pounds apiece, and 
all my plate to be equally divided between them. To Fra : Mildmay, my 
son's sixth daughter, twenty mark in money. To Robert Mildmay of 
Terling, my son in law, ten pounds, to buy him mourning, and to his wife^ a 
ring of twenty shillings. To my grandson Robert Mildmay and his sister 
Amy Mildmay ten pounds apiece. To the said Amy, over and above the 
said ten pounds, the sum of one hundred pounds, to be paid her at her age 
of three and twenty years or day of marriage or six months after. 

Item, I give to my brother Jo: Gurdon of Asou in the County of Suffolk 
Esquire the sum of twenty mark in money and to his wife ten pounds. \ 
give to his four sons, Philip, Nathaniel, Brampton and Barrett, to each of 
them a ring of twenty shillings. To his three daughters, Judith Gould 
Anne Gurdon and Amy Forth, to each of them a ring of twenty shillings 
Item, I give to my sister Saltonstall a ring of twenty shillings. I give to 
my sister Joyce Gurdon six pounds and to her sou James Gurdon and John 
Gurdon the sum of ten pounds. To my niece Fisher a ring of twenty 
shillings and to my niece Leeds a ring of tweuty shillings. To my sister 
in law, my brother Bampton's wife, a ring of twenty shillings. To my 
daughter Wallopp five pounds. To my son Harlackendon a ring of twenty 
shillings and to his wife a ring of twenty shillings. To my cousin Reymond 
of Ipswich forty shillings and to her daughter Russell forty shillings. To 
my man Robert Hugerford six pounds. To my two maids Elizabeth Rey- 
mond and Anne Meade three pounds apiece and all my cloathes (&c. ). 
To the poor of Little Baddow four pounds. Lands, tenements &c. in Bul- 
mer, Essex, Lavenham, Preston or Breutely Suffolk to my son Henry 
Mildmay and his heirs forever. The residue of my goods to my son Henry 
whom I make and appoint my sole executor &c. 

I desire my son Henry to pay to the parties here under named the several 
sums of money that I give. To my cousin Lane, M r Walker, Mr. Gilson, 
Mr Wragg, Mr Willis, Mr Crow, Mr Clarke, Mr Reeve, Mr Folkes, Mr 
Oakes, Mr Benson, Mr Hollock, Mr Harrison, Mr Hicks, Joane Baker and 
Alice Bowne (sums ranging from one to ten pounds apiece). Duke, 6. 



John Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Esq. 25 June 1G77, proved 4 
October 1G79. To my dear and loving wife Anne Gurdon, for and during 
the term of her natural life, my mansion house wherein I now dwell, com- 
monly called Assington Hall, with all the outhouses, barns, stables, orchards, 
yards and gardens belonging to the same, together with the park and warren, 
with the deer and coneys; also the Priory ground late in the occupation of 
Abraham Ilayward, with all the tithes which I have now let to William 
Firrain of Assmgtoii. I also give her, for term of her natural life, the free 
disposition of the Vicaridge Of Assington so often as it shall be void (and 
certain farms in Assington and Stoke next Nayland). All which said 
farms were settled upon my said wife at her marriage with me, with three 



960 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

other farms in Great Cogshall in Essex and other towns thereto adjacent, 
which I do further confirm to ner by this my will and do give them to her 
for and during the term of her natural life. To my son Nathaniel Gurdon 
the farm in which the widow Sach now liveth and holdeth of me, lying and 
being in Great Cogshall and towns adjacent, after my wife's decease. I 
give him one hundred pounds and to his daughter Anne Gurdon, my grand- 
child, one hundred pounds, to be paid unto him for the use of his said 
daughter and paid to her by him at the age of eighteen years. To my son 
Brampton Gurdon one hundred pounds. To my son Barrett Gurdon one 
hundred pounds. To my son in law Mr. John Gould, merchant, and his 
wife my daughter, to each of them ten pounds apiece. To my son in law 
Mi-. John Jollife and his wife my daughter ten pounds apiece and to my 
son in law Dr. Thomas Jacornb and his wife my daughter ten pounds 
apiece. To my eldest son Robert Gurdon ten pounds, to my son Philip 
Gurdon ten pounds, to my son Nathauiel Gurdon and to his wife ten pounds 
apiece, to my son Brampton Gurdon ten pounds and to my son Barret 
Gurdon ten pounds. To my four grandchildren, the children of my son 
Nathaniel, of Woodham in Essex, viz 1 John, Elizabeth, Amy and Judith, 
twenty pounds apiece, to be paid within two years after my decease to their 
father for their use and benefit. To my sister Joyce Gurdon of London, 
widow, and to my sister Gurdon of Letton, in Norfolk, and to my brother 
aud sister Saltonstall forty shillings apiece. To my brother Robert Gurdon's 
two sons, James and John, and to their sister Anne Gurdon forty shillings 
apiece. To Mr. Walker, Mr. Samuel Cradocke and to M r Ashwell forty 
shillings apiece and to Mr. Hinde three pounds. To the poor of Assington, 
Nayland juxta Stoake and Bewers St. Mary and to the poor of Cornard. 
To Amy Hall who served my wife twenty years the sum of ten pounds. 
Bequests to other servants. My wife Anne Gurdon aud my son Philip 
Gurdon to lie my executors. 

Francis Quarles one of the witnesses. Kino-, 129. 

Anne Gurdon of Assington 23 August 1680, proved 16 July 1681. I 
desire that my body may have a private and decent burial. I give to my 
son Robert Gurdon my great seal gold ring which was both his grand- 
father's and his father's. I give to my said son Robert all my stock of deer 
and conies that shall be in the warren park at the time of my death. I 
give, more, to my said son Robert ten pounds. I give to my son in law 
Dr. Thomas Jacomb and my daughter his wife ten pounds apiece. I give 
to my daughter Gould ten pounds. I give to my daughter JollifF ten 
pounds. I give to my son Philip and his wife ten pounds apiece. I give 
to my son Nathaniel aud his wife ten pounds apiece. I give to my son 
Brampton ten pounds. I give to my son Barret ten pounds. Certain 
household stuff to Brampton and to Barret. To my dear brother Mr. 
Henry Parker forty shillings and to my nephew Mr. Henry Parker, his 
son, forty shillings. To my dear brother Mr. Nathaniel Parker forty shil- 
lings. To Ann Gurdon, my son Nathaniel's eldest daughter, thirty and to 
her (his?) daughter Eliza: twenty pounds, to be paid to them at the age of 
twenty years. If either of them die before that age, unmarried, her part 
shall go to the other. To Mr. Thomas Walker of Nayland forty shillings 
and to his wife twenty shillings. Sundry small legacies to others named. 
The remainder of my estate to be laid out in land or otherwise improved 
for the best advantage of my son Nathaniel's children, Ann, Elizabeth, 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 901 

John, Amy, Judeth ami Robert, to be paid to them when they attain to the 
age of twenty years. I do now declare my sun Philip Gurdon and my 
daughter Mrs Anne Jolliflfe to be my executors. Reference to a deed made 
to nephew Mr. Henry Parker and Mr. Thomas Walker of Nayland. 
Proved by both executors. North, 107. 

John Sedlf.y of Southflete, Kent, Esq. ''oon of the Kinges Auditours 
in His Exchequer and Citezein and Stacioner of the Citie of London and 
late Wardeyn of the Crafte of Stacioners," 23 February 1530, proved 15 
November 1532. '• I bequethe my soule to almighty god to our blissed 
Lady and to all the company of hevyn. And my body to be buried in the 
Churche of Southflete in the Trinitie Chapell in the tombe where as Eliza- 
beth my late wife lyeth buried Also I woll that there be as moche money 
dalte and gevyu to as many pour people at the day of my buriall, to euery 
pour man and woman ij' 1 and a halpenye loffe and to euery childe a penny 
and a halpeny loffe, as woll come and receyve it in the wey of almes. Also 
I woll that there be like dole dalt and gevyn to as many po r people and chil- 
dern at my monethes mynde twelve monthes mynde and twoo yeres mynde 
iu likewise as it is at my buriall as woll come and receyve it in the wey of 
almes. Also I woll that there be a Dyuer kept the said day of my buriall 
for all the Preestes and Clerkes and for all other people that will not take 
the said almes. Also I will that myu executours haue as mauey masses as 
they can haue preestes at the day of my buriall w c Deprofundis at euery 
masse at the Lavatory for my soule and for the soules of Elizabeth my wife 
my father my mother graunsers and graundams brothers and susters and all 
our Childern my frendes soules and for the soules of them that I haue fared 
the better by and all xpen soules. Also I will that there be at eu r y ordre 
of the fyve orders of the freres in London a Trentall of masses saide in all 
hast pos sible after my deceas w* Deprofundis at eu r y masse at the Lavatory 
to pray for the soules aforsaid And myn executours to paye to every ordre 
of th.3 said fyve orders of the ffreres X s for the said Trentalles. Also I woll 
that there be made by myn executours at euery ordre of the said fyve 
orders of the freres in London a Chauntrye foreuer to say masse euery day 
foreuer for twoo pence euery day for masse Sfii for euery ordre by yere 
iij h xiiij' 1 And to geve them money for the said Chauntries after xx li yeres 
purchase that is to say to eavy ordre lxj u iij s iiii' 1 And in like wise to haue 
at euery ordre of the said freres an obite and a Trentall of masses eu r y 
yere foreuer for x s a yere for euery ordre And to geve them money for 
the said obites and trentalles after xx tl yeres purchase that is to say to euery 
order x 11 to pray for the soules aforesaid. And myn executours to take 
sewertie cf them if it be not doon then to distreyn for a penaltie in suche 
howsing as is in their monastery for eu r y weke that it is not kept. Also I 
woll that as many prestes monkes ffreres and chanons that woll come as 
may save masse euery day during oon hole yere next after the day of my 
decesse at the awter in the said Trinitie Chapell where as my said wife is 
buried And also where as I by the grace of god shall be buried to say mas.se 
oon after another and eu r y preest to haue iiij' 1 as many as woll come and say 
masse with Deprofundis at euery masse at the lavatory and after masse at 
our Tombe Deprofundis never to be denyed to sey masse at that oon awter 
and at noon other awter during the said yere to pray for the soules aforsaid." 
Reference made to '• londes and tenementes at Rye that was myu the whiche 
was exchaunged with John Mayne for certeyn londes and Teuementes in 
London." " Also I woll and ordeyn that the Aunuitie of foure poundes 



962 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

that I haue graunted to the Priour and Covent of Rocliestre and to their 
successours for a Chauntrie to sey masse every day foreuer And an obite 
euery yere foreuer in their monastery of the profites issues and Revenues 
of all my londes and tenementes in Loudon I woll that it be truely paide 
foreuer daily wekelye monthly and yerely foreuer according to the teno r 
of twoo indentures therof made whereof oon is under their Couent Seall in 
my keping And thother is undre my Seall in their own keping And that the 
said Priour and Covent haue full power and auctoritie to do all thinges to 
the teno r of the said indenture. And if the said Prio r and Covent or their 
Successours at any tyme hereafter doo seasse and sey not the said diuine 
seruice as it is conteyned in the said indentures by the space of a weke then 
I woll that it shall be lefull unto myn heires executours and assignes as 
often and at eu r y tyme as the said diuine seruice doo ceasse and is not saide 
by the space of a weke to entre into the mauo r s of ffiendisbury and Wold- 
ham And to distresse for vj s viij' 1 in the name of a peyn for euery weke 
that the said diuine seruice doo ceasse and is not saide according to the said 
indentures. Also I will that there be an obite kept of x s by the yere 
foreuer in the Abbey of Langdon besides Dover where as my mother lyeth 
buried with dirige and tenne masses that is to sey Dirige of the evyn by 
note and the next day after mass of Requiem by note And the residue of 
the masses to be saide w l the Abbott and Chanons of the said Abbey and 
w l other prestes the Abbot to haue for his labour eu r y yere xij d eu r y Chanon 
preest vj d eu r y Chanon Novys iiij d And to en r y other preest that saith dirige 
and masse vj (l and to eury Childe that helplth the preest to masse a penny 
And for Rvncjing of belles after the custume of other obites And the said 
obite to be doon by the ouersight of the parson of Ryngwolde for the tyme 
being and to sey dirige and masse hauing for his labour euery yere xij' 1 . 
And the residue of the money of the said x s yf any then be lefte to be dalte 
and gevyn to pour people to pray for the soules aforsaid. And the said 
obite to be kept at the Day that my other obittes is kept." Provisions in 
case of "defawte of payment." Ten marks more out of the revenues &c. 
of lands &c. in London and elsewhere to make another ''Chauntrie" in 
Trinity Chapel in the church of Southfleet &c, "an honest preest to say 
masse euery day with Deprofundis at the Lavatory and after masse Depro- 
fundis at our tombe. And the said preest shall say Placebo and Dirige 
euery Munday Wenysday and ffriday in the yere foreuer for the soules 
aforsaid And to say masse euery day in the weke foreuer as it is con- 
teyned in the Indentures made bitwene the Priour and Covent of Rocliestre 
and me in eu r y condicion yf it can be lawfully doon Aud that the said 
Chauntrie of Southflete to be surely made with Induction and w l Institucion 
and a patron to geve it when It is voide " &c. '• Also I woll that thre tapers 
aboute the lampe before the blissed Trinitie be founde foreuer in the trinitie 
Chapeli at Soutliflete. Also I woll that the Churche of Southflete haue 
tenne mrces to repaire the said Churche. Also I geve to the church of 
Southflete xxx s for my tithes and offeringes forgotten. Also I will that 
sir Robert Carter shalbe my Chauntrie preest and begynne my Chauntrye 
at Southflete" &c. during his life, "orelles another honest preest during his 
life, and so oon after another." "Also I woll that there be gevyn to 
twelve pour men and woman at Southflete and Northflete euery Sonday 
foreuer xij' 1 And that eury of them to say a pater noster a ave maria and 
a Crede euery Sonday foreuer at my Tombe in the said Trinitie Chapeli 
to pray for the soules aforesaid." Directions to make and found a similar 
chauntry and obite in the parish church of Navestock, Essex. " Also I geve 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 963 

to the church of Navestoke a torche and iu redy money xl 3 to repaire the 

said ChuTche. Also I wolle that the Annuitie of xliiii s by yere owt of all 
my Londes and tenementes in Uorton be truely paide to the Priores and 
Coven t of Dertfort for an obite euery yere forever and a masse to be said 
euery Sonday and Holydaies in the yere foreuir to pray for the soules 
aforesaid." 

"Also I will that William Sedley myn eldest sonne haue Immediatly 
after that oon yere is fynysshed and ended next after my deceas all my hede 
tenement to dwell in with all the londes w* thappurtenSces in Southflete 
that I bought of Thomas Bayne late Maister Cressell londes and Lundisshe 
londes as John Mathewe and William Vmfrey late had to ferme for terme 
of his lyfe and to the heires of his body lawfully begotten And for defaute of 
suche heires to Remayu to Martyn Sedley my yongest sonne for terme of 
his lyfe and to the heires of his body laufully begotten. And for defaute 
of suche heires Then I wille that all the Revenues Issues and Profites of 
all the said londes and tenementes be equally devided bitwene the thre 
Abbeys and Monasteries of Rochestre Dertford and the Abbey of our 
blissed Lady of grace beside the Towr of London And the Churche of 
Southflete for the terme of fourscore and nyntene yeres seying thre masses 
in eu r y of the said Abbeys and in the said Churche of Southflete eu r y Day 
in the Weke every yere during the said yeres over and aboue the said 
masses for my said Chauntries and obites for the soules aforsaid with 
Deprofundis at the Lavatory and after masse. And after the said four- 
score and nyntene yeres ended and expired the said londes and tenementes 
to be solde by the Priour and Couent of Rochestre then being And by the 
Priores and Couent of Dertforde then being And by the Abbot and 
Couent of the said Abbey of grace then being And the money thereof 
comyng to be bestowed spent and dalte iu masses deades and in charitable 
dedes in their owne Abbeys and Monasteries and in the said Churche of 
Southflete, evynly to be devided in masses and in diriges, and in other places 
as it shall seme best the said Prio r and Covent Priores and Couent Abbot 
and Couent for the tyme being for the soules aforsaid and all xpen soules. 
Also I will that all my londes and tenementes that I bought late of Willrft 
Swan and of Joane Hunt sett lying and being at a place called the Hooke in 
Southflete as Henry Godfrey hath nowe to ferme holely after that oon yere 
is fynysshed and ended next after my deceese shall remayn to Martyn 
Sedley my yongest sonne for terme of his lyfe, and to the heires of his body 
lawfully begotten" (then follow provisions for entailing the remainder first 
on William Sedley and his heirs and lastly on the said three abbeys and the 
Church of Southflete for masses &c.) " Also I woll that all my londes and 
tenementes that I haue in Dertford shall remayn to Dorothye Sedley my 
dowditer being a Nonne in Dertford Abbey during hir lyfe soo that the 
Relations be kept to array hir with the Revenues and profites of it to pray 
for the soules aforesaid And after hir deceas to remayn as other my forsaid 
londes doo and shal Remayne after that my said Chauntries and obites be 
fynysshed." 

Dorothy, the daughter, to have also twenty shillings sterling a year of 
annuity during her life out of all the lands &c, except the two tenements 
given to the two sons, and William also to have, out of the same lands &c, 
twenty pounds sterling a year untill the Will be performed. "And then 
the said Willfn Sedley shalhaue all my londes and tenementes unbequeathed 
pfonrmyng this my will for terme of liis lyfe and to the heires of his body 
laufully begotten And so after to remayn as it is declared in this my wille. 



964 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Also I woll that all the money that I leve in my Coffers and all the 
Reuenues Issues and Profites of all my Londes and tenementes mano r s 
quyte Rentes and Rent chargis not gevyn nor willed nor beqnethed in 
Oxney Bekisborn Stapill Asshe or any other place parisshe or parishes 
within the Countie of Kent, the Rent charge of William Swan gentilman 
within the said Countie, And also of all my Mano 1 ' londes and Tenements 
Quyte Rentes Rent charges in Navestoke Loughton South hemeflete Thun- 
dersley ffobbyng and Corryngham or in any other place wHn the Countie 
of Midd and olleswhere in Englonde to perfourme and fynysshe all the said 
buriall monethis mynde twelve-monthes mynde and twoo yeres mynde doles 
masses Chauntres obittes and all other thinges and bequestes aforerehersed 
and here after rehersed and to pay Immediatly after my deceas all such 
money to the gsones undre written as hereafter foloweth that is to say to 
William Sedley my sonne fourty poundes to fulfill my will truely Martyn 
Sedley my sonne fourty poundes to see my wille truely gfourmed James 
Sedley my brother tenne poundes Elizabeth Sedley my dough ter five mrces 
John Sedley William and Robert the sonnes of William my sonne tenne 
poundes And I woll that the said sonnes of Willm my sonne shalhaue a 
Annuitie of tenne mfces sterlinges by yere when any of them cometh to the 
age of twenty yeres during their lyves and the lenger lyver out of all my 
londes and tenementes, except the twoo tenementes that I haue gevyn to 
my twoo sonnes, ffraunces Sedley tenne poundes and all my wifes apparell 
Dorothy Sedley my doughter a Nonne tenne mrces to pray for me." (Then 
follow sundry bequests to a lot of servants and others.) Sir Robert Carter 
to be ou r seer of this my wille to see it truely pfourmed and to pray for me, 
xl s Deff Sir Robert nowe my prest x s to pray for me," " Henry Godfrey 
of Southflete my ffermo 1 ' to be ouerseer of this my wille to see it truely 
pfo'med And to pray for me fyve mfces And I wolle that the said Henry 
shalhaue my housing and londes that he now dwellith in to ferme for xi 
yeres as he had it of me to ferme before according to Indentures therof 
made. The wife of said Godfrey to pray for me xiij s iiij' 1 ." " Also I will 
that William Axton late my fferrnour at Mailing haue xxx s to pray for me 
And in recompens of the distresse that was taken from him and solde." 
" Also I will that there be an yerely obite foreuer of iij s iiij' 1 of the Issues 
and profites of all my londes in London kept yerely in the Churche of 
Guston beside Dover where James Sedley my graunsir and Jqane my 
grandam lyeth buried to pray for the soules and all the soules aforesaid 
The said obite to be kept w' Dirige and thre masses, every preest to haue 
vj' 1 for dirige and masse the parishe Clerk ij' 1 for Rynging of belles after 
the olde custume And the Residue of the money to be in bred and drynke 
amonge the people at the said obite. And for defawte of payment it shalbe 
lefull unto the Curat and Church Wardeyns of Guston for the tyme being 
to distresse in and upon all my londes and tefites in London and upon all 
my londes in Oxney beside Dover for the terme of fourscore and xix yeres 
yf they doo kepe truely the said obite in manner aforsaid. Also I woll 
that the curate of Guston doo pray in the Pulpitt eu'y sonday in the yere 
foreuer for the soules of me and my wife my father mother Graunsir and 
grandam by name and for all our Childern and see my obite there truely 
kept, And to haue euery yere for his labour viij' 1 Also I geve unto Guston 
Church towarde the Repacions therof xxvi 8 viij' 1 Also I will there be an 
yerely obite foreuer of iij 9 iiij' 1 of the profites of all my londes in London 
kept yerely in the chirch of Westeclyff beside Dover where Robert Sedley 
my father lyeth buried The said obite to be kept with Dirige and thre 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 9t>5 

masses" (then follow instructions similar to those given ahout the obite in 
the Church at Guston). Provisions for keeping the Chauntry and obite 
in the Abbey of Graces near the Tower of London. "Also I woll that 
myn executours doo close and amend w l wynscott the Chapel of saint Anne 
in the said Abbey for the said Chauntrye there to be kept foreuer after the 
teno r of the said indentures. Also I woll that all my yerely Chaun tries 
obittes and masses afore rehersed to be begynne and saide immediately 
after my deceas and so to contynue foreuer and to be truely paide. Also 
I woll that all my evidences and bokes shalbe putt in a great Chest, And 
I woll that the said Chest shall stande w'iu the said Abbey of Dertford in 
our lady Chapell next the ffermery orelles where it shall please my lady 
Priores best and my sonne William to haue the keyes of the said Chest in 
keping and free goyng and comyng therto untill this my will be pfourmed." 
Bequests made to the churches of Oxney, Northflete, Meapham and Hor- 
ton. Prayers to be made for self and wife every Sunday forever. "Also 
I geve unto Milton Churche next gravesende a Torche price V s And the 
preest to pray for me and my wife in the pulpitt as it is abouesaid." Simi- 
lar bequests to the churches at Gravesend, Asshe next Dartford, Brasted, 
Bekesborne, Stapill and Loughton. " Also I geve to the parishe of Al- 
halowes the litle in London toward the Repacions of the Churche there xl s . 
Also I woll when all thinges aforesaid and hereafter rehersed is fynysshed 
and ended, Then I woll that all my Londes and tenemcntes w l thapp r tennces 
in Thundersley Loughton Southbemeflete Corringham and ffobbyng in the 
Countie of Essex shall rcmayn to Marty n Sedley my yongest sonne for 
terme of his lyfe and to the heires of his body lawfully begotten And for 
the defawte of the heires of the said Martyn of his body laufnlly begotten, 
th^n I woll the said Londes and tenemeutes Ileraayn to Willm Sedley 
myn eldest sonne for terme of his lyfe and to the heires of his body lau- 
fully begotten. And for the defawte of suche heires Then I woll that all 
the Reuenues Issues and profites of the said Londes and tenemeutes be 
equally devided bitwene the said thre Abbeys Dertford Rochester and the 
Abbey of Towrc Hill And the said Churche of Southflete for the terme of 
fourscore and nyntene yeres for the maynteynyng and keping of the said 
thre masses in euery of the said thre Abbeys and in the said Churche of 
Southflete euery day in the weke euery yere during the said fourscore and 
nyntene yeres over and aboue the said masses for my said Chauntries and 
obittes to pray for the soules aforsaid and after that the said fourescore and 
nyntene yeres is ended, Then I woll yf the said londes and tenementes can 
be mortised to the said Abbeys and to the said Church of Southflete eu r y 
oon their owne parte, then to mortise it, And to sey three masses euery day 
in the yere foreuer in euery of the said Abbeys and in the said Churche of 
Southflete, ouer and aboue the said masses for my forsaid Chauntries and 
obittes. And yf the said Londes and tefites cannot be mortised as it is 
aforsaid Then I woll that it be solde by the said Prio* and Couent, Priores 
and Couent, and Abbot & Couent or by their Successours, And the money 
thereof to be bestowed spent and dalte in almes and Charitable dedes and 
in masses and diriges in their owne Abbeys and in the said Church of 
Southflete evynly to be devided in foure partes to pray for the soules afor- 
said and all xpen soules." My brother James Sedley to have ten marks a 
year during his life. "Also I woll that my doughter Dorothe Sedley haue 
my pott of siluer with the kever that is w* Rynges in the topp of the kever, 
my r doughter Elizabeth Sedley to haue my gilte goblet, John Sedley to 
haue my grettist siluer pott, ffraunces Sedley to haue the litel! pott of siluer 



966 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

with the kever. My sonne William Seclley to haue oon of the grettist Cup- 
pis of siluer w l a kever. My sonne Martyn Seclley to haue the secunde Cupp 
of siluer without a kever after the first yere is ended n^xt after my deceas. 
Also I wille that all the residue of my siluer plate ant all my householde 
stuffe and bedding, And all myn apparell And all my Corne and Catall he 
equally devided hitwene my twoo sonnes at thende of the ye e next after my 
decesse." " I woll to Thomas Ilurtcn doughter that hath naried oon Wil- 
liam Olyff and to a nother doughter of the said Thomas Hurton that the 
said Willffi Olyff can tell whom she hath maried and where she dwellith 
haue eche of them fyve mrces, And if they he decessed then to their heires 
and childern." Certain bequests for the improving of highways. " Also 
I woll that if any psone woll swere upon a boke that I doo owe him any 
money and myn executours doth thinke his owthe not trewe, then the said 
psone to bringe laufull witnesse before my Lordes the twoo chief Juges or 
before any other twoo Juges to prove the said dett, And then myn executo r s 
w'xnit any further delay to paye asmoche money as the said twoo chief 
Juges or other ij Juges shall awarde after their conscience." Conditional 
provision for a chauutry in the Abbey of Dertford. 

"Also I make and ordeyn myn executours of this my last wille and tes- 
tament William Sedley my eldest sonne Martyn Sedley my yongest sonne 
and my Lady Priores of Dertford for the tyme being, oon after another 
successyvely to perfourme and fulfill this my wille in euery condicion, And 
I woll that noon of myn executours shall medill with the perfourmaunce 
and fulfilling of this my said will and testament but oonly the said William 
Sedley my sonne to medill during his lyf, And after his deceas none but 
oonly the said Martyn Sedley my sonne to medill during his lyfe, And 
after his decesse my Lady Priores of Dertford for the tyme being, And 
after hir deceas the next Priores oon after a nother successively to medill 
till this my will and testament be pfo r med in eu r y condicOn And I make 
and ordeyn the Priour of Rochester, the Abbot of Towre Hille, sir Robert 
Carter and Henry Godfrey my Ouerseers of this my last wille and testa- 
ment to see it tritely perfourrned and fulfilled in euery condicion, And yf by 
Lerned councell that this my wille be made shorter for great ease to the 
Reders and the executours of it, soo that the entent and the trewe meanyng 
of this my last wille be not chaunged I am content, but that thentent herein 
nowe written shall always be as it is nowe written." Thower, 20. 

William Sedley, son of John Sedley of Southflete, Kent, Esq., 28 
November 1553, proved 4 December 1555. My body to be buried in the 
Church of Southflete whereas my father, my mother and my wife are buried 
and " withe suche service as shalbe used to he doon in the churche for deade 
lolkes, And like service to be doon to the Laude of god at my monethes 
mynde, two yeres minde and tine yeres minde, for my sovvle, my frendes 
and all xpen sowles. And I will that there be given and delte in the 
parishe churche wheare I shall be buried, at the daie of my buriall, of my 
monthes minde, of my yeres minde, two yeres minde and thre yeres mind:', 
by myue heires or executors, to euerie poor marine a penny lore of breade, 
to euerie poore woman a penny lofe and to euerie poore childe a halfe 
penny lofe of breade, at euerie of the said Daies to as many poore folkes as 
will cum and receiue hit in the waie of alines to praie for the saide sowles. 
A 'id I will that there be made and kepte by myne heires and executors a 
dinner at the daie of my buriall and at the daie of my monethes minde, for 
all suche personnel as do not receiue the saide Almes and will cum to din- 






vft 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 907 

nor, to praie for my sowle, mv frendes and all xpen sowles. Also I will 
that there be a Sermon made by a well learned manne of the woorde of 
god in the churche wheare I shalbe buried the daie of my buriall and 

monthes minde." Sundry bequests to the poor of various parishes. "Also 
1 will that John my sonne, or my sister or either of them, do giue, within 
thre yeres nexte after my decease, to poore maidens marriages, And to 
other poore folkes their deuocion after theire discretion, untill the somme 
of five poundes be fully given to praie for the saide sowles. Also I will 
that the saide John my sonne shall geue within the saide thre yeres to tenne 
Studientes of Diuinitie in the Vniversitees lackinge exhibition, whome my 
saide sonne shall thinke to be godlie, x s apece, to praie for my sowle, and 
all the said sowles." Provisions to carry out, if possible, the pious bequests 
made by his father iu his last will and testament. To Master William 
Wombwell, my godson, thirteen shillings four pence. To Mistress Kath- 
erine, my god daughter, forty shillings. To Sister Elizabeth Cressener 
forty shillings. To my cousin Androwe Ilawes twenty shillings. To my 
cousin Androwe Cooke, her* niece, to her marriage, forty shillings. To 
my cousin Thomas Betenham, of the money he oweth me for his annuity, 
twenty shillings. To his brother and three sisters twenty six shillings eight 
pence. (To others, named, various sums, among whom a Suster Efllyn 
and a Suster Mary Benham). To John Sedley my son, to see my will 
performed, one hundred pounds. To my daughter Anne, my son's wife, 
one hundred shillings. To Robert Sedley, my son, to see my will per- 
formed, one hundred marks. To Nicholas, my son, to see my will performed, 
one hundred marks. To my daughter Elizabeth, she to marry at her 
pleasure by the counsel of her aunt, my sister, and of John my son, her 
brother, and to have meat, drink and lodging till she be married or 
else be found in a good service, three hundred marks. To my brother 
Martin, to see my will performed, fifty marks. To my sister Darothy, to 
see my will performed, twenty pounds. To my nephew Marten, my 
brother's son, five marks. To sundry churches for repairs. To the amend- 
ment of highways. To my sister Dorothy Sedley an annuity of ten pounds 
a year during her life. To John Sedley, my eldest son, Robert Sedley, 
mj r second son, Nicholas Sedley, my youngest son, my sister Dorothy, my 
daughter Hyde and my daughter Elizabeth (sundry pieces of silver plate). 
I give to my brother Mai ten Sedley my manor of Morley Hall in the 
County of Norfolk (being of the yearly value of fifteen pounds clear above 
the charges) wherein my brother dwelleth, late bought of Sir Harry Parker, 
knight, to have and to hold freely during his natural life, and after his de- 
cease to remain to my nephew Martin Sedley, his son, and to his heirs of 
his body lawfully begotten, upon condition that my said '• Nevy " and his 
heirs &c. shall yearly pay or cause to be paid, at the Feasts of the Annun- 
ciation of our blessed Lady and of St. Michael the Archangel, five pounds 
of good money to my son and heir John Sedley and to his heirs &c, and, 
for lack of such, to my right heirs &c. I give to Elizabeth Sedley, my 
daughter, all my lands &c. in Frensbury &c. in Kent. To my son Thomas 
Hide and to Frances Hyde his wife, my daughter, during their natural 
lives and the longer liver of them, an annuity of five pounds a year that I 
have out of his manor of Willesthorne, Herts, and after their decease the 
said annuity to remain to George Hyde their son &c. remainder to the 
right heirs of the said Frances for ever. To my sister Dorothy Sedley 

[* This phrase (" her niece ") makes nv, suspect that the names I have written Androwo 
were meant to be AihIiowc, which would be another reading for Audrey. H. F. W.] 



968 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

my tenement at the church in Southflete that Bull now dwelleth in, to have 
and to hold &c. during her life, the remainder to John Sedley and his heirs, 
he keeping it in repair during my sister's life. Reference made to testator's 
property, which seems to have included dwelling houses, inns, dye-houses, 
brew-houses, farms &c. (in numerous parishes in Kent) and in Merifelde 
and Fletchinge, Sussex, and Navestocke, Loughton and Wisden, Essex, 
also in Staunford, Coriugham, Fobbinge, Thundersley, Bemsflete and Ilad- 
ley in Essex. My cousin Thomas Breteuham of Pluckley (Kent). Lands 
in Tottenham, Middlesex, which I late bought of my brother Martin Sedley. 
I make aud ordain John Sedley, my son, Dorothy Sedley, my sister, 
Robert and Nicholas Sedley, my sons, to be my executors &c. and Martin 
Sedley, my brother, and Thomas Hyde, my son, and Frances his wife, my 
daughter, and Elizabeth Sedley, my daughter, and John Hudson of South- 
fleet to be my overseers. More, 37. 






Nicholas Sedley of the Charterhouse, Middlesex, Esquire, 14 May 
1574, proved 1 February 1574. To be buried in the parish church of St. 
Pulcres. I give and bequeath all my lands, tenements and hereditaments 
being and lying in Mepsham, Kent, to Jane my wife, for t«rin of her life, 
remainder to the heirs of my body, then to Robert Sedley, my brother, and 
his heirs. Lands in Surrey, Herts and Hampshire. My daughter Susan 
to be in the custody and under the government of ray wife until her 
full age of twenty one or marriage. My godson William Sedley. My 
brother John Sedley. My sister Elizabeth Culpeper. My cousin George 
Hyde. My cousin Martin Sedley. My godson Nicholas Hyde. My wife 
Jane to be executrix. William Sedley Esq. father unto me the said Nicho- 
las. Pyckering, 5. 

John Sf.dley of Southflete, Kent, Esq., eldest son of William Sedley 
late of Southflete deceased Esq., 29 March 1581, proved 23 August 1581. 
To be buried in the church of Southflete "in the chappell there where- 
as my graundfather and my graundmother my ffather and my mother lye 
buried layinge there a stone upon me makinge mencion by gravinge in 
brasse thereuppou that my bodye is there buried." To my wife Anne Sed- 
ley all those my lands and tenements &c. in Kent mentioned in a pair of 
Indentures made between me and my said wife's natural brethren Richard 
Colepepyr and John Colepepyr. My eldest son William Sedley. Lands 
that were his grandfather's or great-grandfather's, in London, Essex or 
elsewhere. My second son John Sedley and my youngest son Richard 
Sedley, Elizabeth aud Dorothy Sedley, ray two daughters. My natural 
brother Robert Sedley. The heirs of the body of my natural brother 
Nicholas Sedleye deceased. My sister Elizabeth Colepepir. The heirs of 
the body of my sister Frances Hide deceased. I will aud give unto Mr. 
John Tufton my son in law, to make him a ring with, twenty shillings. 
Also I give unto Anne, Elizabeth and Margaret Tufton, my said son Tufton's 
daughters, to every of them when they shall accomplish the age of sixteen 
years forty shillings to buy them some Jewell, six pounds. To my brother 
Robert twenty shillings to make him a ring and I will that a bill of four- 
score pounds or thereabouts which he oweth me be unto him delivered. To 
my brothers in law M 1 . Thomas Colepepyr and Mr. John Colepepir twenty 
shillings each (for rings). To ray natural sister Elizabeth Colepepir, wife 
of the said Mi-. John Colepepir, to make her a ring, ten shillings. To my 
brother in law Mr. Richard Colepepir, to make him a ring, forty shillings. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 9G9 

Also I give unto my "cosigne" Mr. Martin Sedley, to make him a ring, 
twenty shillings. To my brother John Colepipir's son, my godson, twenty 
shillings. I make my wife Anne and my eldest son William my executors. 

Proved by the oath of Anne Sedley, relict and executrix, power reserved 
for William Sedley. the other executor named &c. 

Commission issued 20 April 1 G38 to Sir John Sedley, Baronet, grandson 
of the said .John Sedley deceased, to administer the goods left unadminis- 
tered by Anne Sedley the relict &c, now also deceased. Darcy, 31. 

Martyn Sedley of Morley, Norfolk, gen 1 ., 12 May 1608, proved 5 
March 1G09. My body to be buried in the church of St. Peter's in Morley, 
I have already conveyed and assured my manor of Morley Hall (and other 
lands &.c.) in the said County unto my son Martyn Sedley and to his heirs 
male &c, unto whom I do hereby give and bequeath all my deeds, charters, 
evidences, ffeoffments, escripts and muniments, court books, court rolls, 
Accompts, Indentures of Bargains and Sales and all other my writings 
whatsoever that do belong or do appertain unto all the said manors and to 
every of them. Certain lands in Shimpling and Dickleborowe, Norfolk, un- 
to Robert Sedley my son and to his heirs forever, and all deeds &c. belong- 
ing to the same. I have by my deed indented long since granted unto 
Raffe Sedley my son, now Sir Raffe Sedley, knight, one annuity or yearly 
rent of twenty pounds, to be issuing and going out of my manor of Some- 
hall and Burfford Hall, otherwise Flynt hall, Norfolk, &c. I do hereby 
utterly make void, frustrate and to be of none effect the said deed and grant 
of twenty pounds by year &c. (as in the condition or proviso in the said 
deed expressed). Certain servants named. The poor of Wemondham, 
Hingham &c. The residue of my goods &c. to my wife Abigail, whom I 
appoint executrix. Wingfield, 22. 

Sententia proconfirmacione was declared 28 June 1G10 in a cause between 
Abigail Sedley, the relict and executrix of. the above will, on the one part 
and Sir Raphe Sedley, knight, Martin Sedley, Robert Sedley, Ann Smith 
ah Sedley and Meriale Gurdon ah Sedley, sons and daughters of the de- 
ceased. Wingfield, 53. 

[I have given a large space to my collection of wills illustrating the pedigree 
of the Saltonstalls and one or two of the families into which they intermarried, 
it being the accumulated gatherings of nearly a dozen years' gleaning among the 
wills stored in Somerset House. And I have quoted largely from the will of 
John Sedley (1530-1532) for the reason that it is a very good specimen of the 
will of a pious gentleman of that period, and it may interest the many "good 
Bostonians" and others of New England and New York and elsewhere in the 
United States who can claim a descent from him to learn what pains he took 
for the welfare of his soul, his father's and mother's souls, the souls of his 
grandfather and grandmother and all Christian souls, by founding charities, 
establishing obites and directing the saying and singing of masses and diriges. 
It was his great-granddaughter, Muriel Sedley, who became the second wife of 
Brampton Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Esq., and the mother of Muriel Sal- 
tonstall. 

In Ilavleian MS. 4G30 (page 512) is given a pedigree of Saltonstall of Hunt- 
wickc (bearing Arg : a bend Gules between 2 eaglets displayed Sable) beginning 
with Gilbert Saltonstall who purchased Kookes in Ilipperholme and other lands 
and had issue Samuel and Richard. The younger was afterwards knighted, 
served the office of the Sheriff of London A.D. 1583 and was Lord Mayor of that 
city in 1597. His elder brother, Samuel, son and heir of Gilbert, married three 
wives : First, Anne, daughter of Mr. John Ramsden of Longley ; second, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Mr. Thomas Ogdeu; and third, Mrs. Elizabeth Armine of 
Hull, widow. By the last wife he had no issue. The issue by the other two 
wives is given. His eldest son and heir (by his first wife) was our Sir Richard 



970 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Saltonstall, the friend of Winthrop and one of the founders of Massachusetts 
Bay Colony. He is described as Justice of the Peace and Treasurer for Lame 
Soldiers in the West Hiding of Yorkshire the first year of the Reign of King 
Charles the First. We are told that he married Grace, daughter of Robert 
Kaye of Woodsome Esq., and had issue several children, sons aud daughters. 
After her death he sold his lands and went with his children into New England 
where he lived and (as was said) married the daughter of the Lord Delaware 
and in the troublesome times came into England and resided at London. In the 
same MS. is given a pedigree of Ramsden of Longley near Hothersfield (Hud- 
dersfleld?) in which Anne Saltonstall is shown to be the daughter of John, sou 
of Robert Ramsden, The arms are described as Argent, on a chevron Sable 3 
rams' heads couped of the First. 
See also Hunter's Collection in Additional MS. 24,458 (265). In Harleiau MS. 




(1' 

MS. 12,471. See Signet Office Docquet for note of Pardons granted to John 

and Brampton Gurdon (Vol. 13, August, 16G0). 

From the late Col. Chester's extracts from the P. R. of St. Leonard's, Shore- 
ditch (through the kindness of Dr. Marshall) I gathered the following : 

Mar: 1617 June 18 Richard Saltonstall Esq. aud Elizabeth Bassano 
(Hoxton). 

Sir Richard Saltonstall, the Lord Mayor of London, was a member of the 
Skinners Company and a Merchant Adventurer. He was admitted to Freedom 
18 December 5 th Edw. VI. (1551). John Saltonstall, son of Edward Saltonstall 
of Staines, Middlesex, yeomau, was apprenticed to him Xraas 1564 for eight 
years. Richard, son of Richard, Saltonstall was sworn 31 May 1580 by patri- 
mony of his said father and paid for his admission. Under date November 20, 
1599, I found this : " M d . that whereas at the Request of the Right honourable 
S r . Richard Saltonskall late Lord Maior, on the behalf e of the Lady Maioresse, 
by order of the Court of Aldr'en the XXVI of October 1598, y l was ordered that 
John Held shoulde be admitted into the frcedomc and liberties of th« City of 
London by redemption in this Companie of Skinners as p' Copie of record under 
the Towne Clerkes hand appeareth Thsirc Wo™. p r nta at this Courte according 
to auncient custome in that behalfe have admitted the said John Held a free 
brother of this Compauie of Skynners by redorapcon and the said John paied 

for his admission iij 3 iiij d And then the said John Helde did 

promise my M rs . the Wardens a hoggeshed of the strongest bere whensoeuer 
they wold demaund it." Henry F. Waters.] 

Elizabeth Grave, June 18, 1587 (ante, page 935). — 

[I have no doubt that the above widow, Elizabeth Grave, was that unnamed 
wife of Richard Grave referred to in the will of John Elyott of Stortford par- 
sonage (1557) of which I gave an abstract in the Register for July 1S94 (p. 390; 
an«e, p. 898), and John Elvott, her eldest son (likewise referred to) was, we 
may infer, her son by a previous marriage. If this is a correct inference we 
are still left in the dark as to the name of her former husband and his exact 
relationship to the rest of the Eliot family. Henry F. Waters.] 

William Willougiiby, Portsmouth, 1 August 1650, signedand sealed 
28 November 1650, proved 6 May 1651. My wife Elizabeth to be execu- 
trix. To my eldest son Francis Willoughby two hundred pounds, to be 
paid him within twelve months after my death. If my foresaid wife should 
at any time after my death be married again to another then I do hereby 
give to my said son Francis three hundred pounds more of my lawful 
moneys. And I give him half of my movable goods whatsoever and half 
my plate; which said moneys and goods he shall receive at or about the 
time when my wife Elizabeth shall be married to another or any time after 
when he shall appoint. I do give and bequeath unto each of the three 
eldest children of my son Francis that are now remaining alive fifty pounds 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 971 

apiece, which for all three amounteth to au hundred and fifty pounds, to 
remain in the hands of Elizabeth my foresaid wife, except she marry her- 
self to another, which if she doth then it shall be forthwith, at or about the 
time of her marriage, made over to my son Francis, to be by him paid unto 
the male children when they shall come to the age of twenty years and to 
the female children either at the day of marriage or at eighteen years of 
age. To my son William ten pounds for his portion and no more till it 
shall please God to gire him grace, or till he be ciyilized, betaking himself 
to some lawful calling to live in the world as a man should do, which if he 
do and after one year's experience thereof there shall be testimony brought 
concerning the truth of the same under four godl} T men's hands, I no hereby 
give and bequeath unto him one hundred pounds besides the ten pounds 
forementioned. Another bequest of a hundred pounds in case he live for 
another twelve months a reformed and civilized life, testimony being had to 
that effect. Provision made for his children in case of his remaining " in 
his present deboisht and wicked condition, not reformed" &c. To my 
cousin Lawrence Hamond twenty pounds, to be paid when he shall be 
twenty years of age, and if he die before he come to that age my wife 
Elizabeth to dispose of it as she pleaseth. A provision for an augmenta- 
tion of this legacy. To such poor kindred as doth belong unto me and to 
my wife twenty pounds to be divided amongst them. To poor house- 
keepers in Portsmouth five pounds. To poor housekeepers in the Hamlet 
of Wapping in Middlesex, London, where I forrnerty dwelt, five pounds. 
To John Greene five pounds for his care, helpfulness and assistance to my 
wife in the management of my business and settling my accompts, which 
he shall receive of her as soon as it is finished or at her discretion. My 
eldest son Francis Willoughby and my special friends Mr Maurice Thomp- 
son and Mr John Tailor to take upon them the charge and to be the over- 
seers of this my will &c. 

John Greene and Laurence Hamond witnesses. Grey, 104. 

William Willoughbie of Portsmouth in the Co. of Southampton gen 4 , 
6 December 1657, proved 5 March 1658. I give to my dear and loving 
wife Mary Willoughbie my two dwelling houses situate and being in Ports- 
mouth, with the malt house and appurtenances, and all goods of mine what- 
soever freely to enjoy during the term of her natural life. And my will is 
that she should have all the abovementioned goods whatsoever with my 
little house in Watlington Street and my malt house, with all appurtenances 
&c, to her and her heirs forever and my now dwelling house she shall have 
during the term of her natural life only. If my wife Mary Willoughbie 
doth marry again my will is that she should pay, upon the day of her mar- 
riage, or cause to be paid unto Jonathan Willoughbie, my brother Wil- 
loughbie's eldest son, the sum of fifty pounds of currant English money. 
Item, my will is that then my wife should pay unto Nehemiah, my brother 
Willoughbie's son, the sum of fifty pounds &c, and that she, at the foremen- 
tioned day, pay to William Willoughbie, my brother Willoughbie's youngest 
son the sum of fifty pounds &c, provided that if any of these forementioned 
kindred of mine do die before the time appointed for payment of these 
legacies I have bequeathed them then my will is that the deceased's legacy 
should remain to my wife, provided moreover that though those foremen- 
tioned legacies be set to be paid at one set appointed time yet I leave the 
payment thereof, that is the time of payment, to the discretion of my over- 
seers. Item, mv will is that after the decease of mv wife mv kinsman 



i 



972 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

William Willoughbie, my brother Willoughbie's youngest son, should have 
my now duelling house, garden and backside, with the appurtenances 
thereunto belonging to him and his heirs forever. And my will is that 
there should he paid by my wife, or her executors, fifty pounds &c. to the 
other three of my kindled forementioned, to each of them fifty pounds, this 
payment to be made after my wife's decease. I give to my brother 
Lydyate's son Timothie the sum of five pounds. I give to Ilenricke Lleff- 
ton the sum of five pounds with some of my wearing clothes, which my wife 
shall think fit. I give to my servant Susanna Trill five pounds. I make 
my loving wife Mary Willoughbie my full and sole executrix. Item, I 
would not have my wife exceed the sum of fifteen pounds for my funeral. 
I make my loving brother Willoughbie and my brother Lydiat overseers of 
this my last will and testament. 

Wit: John Beeston, Sam: Williams. Wootton, 188. 

Mary Brickenden of Tile-hurst, Berkshire, widow, 29 May 1688, 
proved 13 June 1688. I give and devise unto my nieces Mary James, 
spinster, and Anne James, spinster, daughters of my brother Mr. Philip 
James late of Portsmouth in the Co. of Southampton, mercer, deceased, 
and to their heirs and assigns for ever all that my house and late malt 
house, now used as a store-house or magazine, situate and being in Wack- 
lington Street in Portsmouth, now in the tenure or occupation of the Master 
of the Ordnance belonging to the King's Majesty or his assigns, to hold to 
them the said Mary James and Anne James and their heirs &c. for ever, 
provided that the rents, issues and profits of the said house and premisses 
shall be received by my executors, hereafter named, during the minority of 
the said Mary and Anne and until they shall attain their several and re- 
spective ages of one and twenty years, these rents to be employed for their 
best advantage &c. I give unto my said two nieces fifty pounds apiece, to 
be paid them at their several ages of one and twenty years or days of mar- 
riage, which shall first happen, with legal interest for the same in the mean 
time, the legacy of the one dying before her legacy becomes due to go to 
the survivor of them. I also give them the old debenters of thirty pounds 
due to me for the rent of my said houses in Portsmouth. And I do give 
unto my said two nieces five pounds apiece to buy them mourning. 

Item, I desire that my executors do pay the one hundred pounds which 
ray first husband Mr William Willoughby gave unto his nephew Nehemiah 
Willoughby and to his niece Sarah Kempfeild to ba equally-divided between 
them upon my decease. I do desire that my executors do pay the one 
hundred pounds which my last husband Mr. John Brickenden gave unto 
his sister Mrs Mary Ilalfheid in case she do outlive me. I give unto my 
niece and god daughter Mrs Letitia Maria Brickenden ten broad pieces of 
gold. I give unto my servant Elizabeth Trill, in case she do continue to 
live with me till my death, ten pounds of lawful money of England with 
all my woollen clothes and some part of my wearing linen. All the rest 
and residue of my personal estate, money, plate, rings, jewels &c. I hereby 
give and bequeath unto my niece Mrs Sarah Norris, wife of Mr Samuel 
Norris, rector of Tilehurst aforesaid, and to my niece Mrs Margaret Lloyd, 
now wife of Mr. Nathaniel Lloyd. And I do hereby make and appoint 
the said Mr. Samuel Norris and Mr Nathaniel Lloyd to be joint executors 
of this my last will and testament.' I desire to be buried by my last hus- 
band at Englefield and that my funeral expenses may not exceed twenty 
pounds. I give the sum of thirty shillings to buy bread to be given to the 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



973 



») 



poor of Engl en eld at my funeral and also the sum of forty shillings to buy 
bread to be given at the same time to the poor of Tilehurst. Lastly I de- 
sire my loving neighbours Mr Thomas Mason of Sulham and my loving 
friend Mr. Richard Twitchin of Inckpen to be overseers &c. Exton, 74. 

[I have had for many years the notes of the wills of Col. William Willoughby 
ami William Willoughby, his son, the father ami brother of our Deputy Gover- 
nor Francis Willoughby. Only recently, however, have I come upon the "will 
o( Mrs. Mary Brickenden who, it is evident, had been the widow and executrix 
of the second William Willoughby. Her description of the house and malt 
hou>e in YVackliugton (or Watlington) street, Portsmouth, and her mention of 
her husband's uephew Nehemiah Willoughby, will be considered sufficient proof 
of that. She also mentious her former husband's niece Sarah Kempfeild. This, 
of course, was that " daughter Camfleld" mentioned in our Gov. Willoughby's 
Mill. It was my good fortune to find, a good many years ago, in the office of 
the Clerk of the Courts for Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at East Cam- 
bridge, in the Bundle of Court Papers for Sept.-Dec. 1681 (fie Francis Wil- 
loughby's executors vs. Laureuce Hammond), a Bond of Francis Willoughby of 
Charlestown, merchant, given 1 February 16G7, unto Mrs. Parnell Nowell of 
Charlestown, in the sum of two hundred pounds, for the payment of one hun- 
dred pounds on the 1 st day of February 1668 ; signed ffr : Willoughby witnessed 
Laur. Hammond and Richard Waldron, assigned by Mrs. Parnell Nowell to 
her daughter Mrs. Mary Long, the relict of Mr. John Long, 26 Dec. 1684, and 
endorsed with a receipt by Parnell Nowell, July 7, 1671, in part payment from 
Mrs. Margarst Willoughby. fifty pounds. Attached to Gov. Willoughby's sig- 
nature was an impression of his armorial seal : Fretty : Crest, a lion's head 
between two wings expanded. This crest, differing from those usually given 
to the Willoughby families, was, I found, somewhat similar to that given in 
Burke's General Armory (edition of 1878) to Sir Francis Willoughby, knighted by 
Sir Arthur Chichester, Lord Deputy of Ireland, 30 October 1610. Later, finding 
that Mrs. Salisbury, of New Haven, Connecticut, was interested in this family 
and gathering all she could about them, I made known my discovery to her, 
referring also to Burke's General Armory, and at her request and by permission of 
the Clerk of the Courts for Middlesex, I secured the services of my friend Mr. 
Henry Mitchell, the well known seal engraver of Boston, who got a good im- 
pression and made an excellent fac-simile of the seal. I have since recalled to 
mind that I have seen an impression of the same seal (or one vastiy like it), in 
the Probate Files either of Suffolk or Essex Co., and it has been depicted in the 
Heraldic Journal (a copy of which I have not hoav at hand), as a seal bearing 
arms which had not then been identified. 

In the same bundle of Court Papers to which I have referred, I found also a 
copy of the will of Mrs. Margaret Hammond, 21 August 1680, and a Declaration 
of a Trust 12 May 1662, Thomas Bragne of Southwick, Co. of Hamps. Clark 
and William Webb, citizen and grocer of London, beginning — " Whereas ffran- 
cis Willoughby of ye Citty of London. Esquire, by one obligacon in writeing 
under his hand and scale, bearing even date w th these presents, stands bound 
unto us, ye said Thomas Bragne &. William Webb, in ye summc of fower hun- 
dred poundes, for ye paiement of Two hundred poundes unto Margarctt his wife, 
in case she should Survive him the said ffrancis, or to such of the Children of 
ye said Margarctt as she shall in her life tyme appoint by word of month or 
writeing " &c, &c. This document was signed by Thomas Bragne and William 
Webb, with their armorial seals attached, and witnessed by Nathaniel Camfleld 
and Nehemiah Willoughby. 

Many years ago, also. I found in the Registry of Probate at Salem (Essex Co. 
Prob. Reg. 303 L. 270) a copy of the will of John Arnald of London, in Thames 
Street dweller, mariner, but now resident in New England, in the town of Salem, 
and bound to sea, 12 October 1G80 (proved 28 January 1691-5) who mentioned 
cousin Nehemiah Willoughby of Salem, referring to a legacy left by " my 
grandfather John Tailer of Woppin shipwrite " deceased, with legacies left to 
brothers Thomas and Samuel, both deceased, " falling to me their survivor." 
Ever since I came to England I have kept a note of this at hand, hoping, some 
time or other, to come across that will of " John Tailer of Woppin shipwrite," 
the grandfather of John Arnald and possibly grandfather also of Nehemiah 
Willoughby. It gives me pleasure now to present this will as well as that of 



974 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Thomas Taylor, his brother, and of Joane Locke of Wapping who mentions 
" ray nncle John Tayler of Wapping." Henry F. Waters.] 

Joane Locke of Wapping, Middlesex, singlewoman, 10 October 1640, 
proved 29 June 1641. I give and bequeath to my loving brother Robert 
Locke the sum of twelve pounds to be paid him out of twenty five pounds 
in his own hands. I give to my sister Elizabeth Locke three pounds, to 
my sister Ruth Sparke three pounds, to my sister Anne Gwyn three 
pounds, to my sister Susanna Woodcocke two pounds, to my sister Faith 
Woodcocke two pounds, to Edward Lester my cousin forty shillings, to my 
cousiu Robert Lester forty shillings and to my cousin Judith Lester forty 
shillings. My five sisters' money, my will is, shall be paid out of the 
twenty five pounds that is in my brother's hand, within six mouths after 
my decease, and my cousins' to be paid when they come to age or at their 
day of marriage. I give to Catherine Rogers and Margaret Harrison 
twenty shillings between them. I give to my loving friend Mr. Thomas 
Spurdinge forty shillings for a sermon which I desire he may preach at my 
funeral. To my uncle Lock's daughter's son's child which I was witness 
to I give twenty shillings. I give to my friend Lucy Honor ten shillings 
and to Mrs Renall ten shillings. And I make and ordain my uncle John 
Tayler of Wapping my full and sole executor of this my last will and testa- 
ment. Evelyn, 77. 

Thomas Taylor of Wapping, Middlesex, shipwright, 15 December 
1658, proved 10 January 1658. Son Jonathan in the P^ast Indies, whither 
he is gone on a voyage. Son Caleb Taylor. Son Jonathan's daughter 
Elizabeth (at one and twenty). His wife. My wife Sarah. My freehold 
lands, tenements &c. in Essex. My copy hold lands &c. in Essex. My 
fee farm rents arising out of the manor of Wighton in Norfolk. My lands, 
tenements &c. in and about Han worth in the said County of Middlesex. 
My adventure in the ship wherein son Jonathan went forth on the voyage. 
My wife to bring up son Caleb until he shall attain the age of one and 
twenty years. If the father of the intended husband of my daughter Han- 
nah Taylor shall (as hath been propounded) settle for my said daughter's 
jointure thirty pounds a year in lands or tenements &c. My daughter 
Ruth Taylor at marriage or age of twenty one. My daughter Wiliner and 
her daughter lately born. My daughter Wilson and her child. My broth- 
ers and sisters children and my wife's sisters children. Master Matthew 
Chafey and Master Robert Lambe. To the church of -Christ in Wapping 
whereof I am a member five pounds to be disposed of at the discretion of 
the said Master Chafey and Mr. Lambe. My apprentices Nathaniel Prest- 
land and Richard Goffe. Master Hansard Knowles my son Caleb's school- 
master. Wife Sarah to be sole executrix and my brother Master John 
Taylor and ray cousin Richard Arnold to be overseers. Pell, 8. 

[Young Caleb Taylor's schoolmaster, Mr. Hansard Knowles, or Knolles, is a 
person well known to those acquainted with the early history of New England. 

* H. F. Waters.] 

John Taylor of Wapping, Middlesex, Esquire, 1 February 1669, proved 
1 8 February 1 Gi'A). I give unto ray son John Taylor all that my mansion house 
wherein myself and he now dwell and all those six new erected tenements 
on the East side of the Dock yard, together with the Dock yard, cranes, 
storehouses &c. to the same freehold belonging, according to a former deed 
by which I did assure it to him and the heirs of his bodv by him lawfully 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. i»75 

begotten on the body of Abigail his first wife, and for want of such heirs 
then to any other his children or others to whom he shall dispose it, and 
all deeds and writings that I have concerning the same premisses; all which 
premisses are situate, lying and being on the South side of Wapping Street 
in the parish of St. Mary Matfellon als Whitechapel and were by me lately 
bought, the one moiety thereof of John Dearsly deceased and the other 
moiety thereof of one William Startute, who purchased his part of Thomas 
Dearsly deceased, as by the writings and deeds relating to the same pur- 
chases will appear. I give all that my yard called the Reed yard situate 
on the North side of Wapping Street, which I bought of Mr. Warren, and 
do hold the same by lease for the term of four hundred years to come 
(or thereabouts), unto my grandchild John Taylor, and all deeds, assurauces 
and writings concerning the same. Provided that if my said son John Tay- 
lor shall pay or cause to be paid to my said grandchild John Taylor the 
sum of Two hundred pounds when my said grandchild shall arrive to the 
age of one and twenty years or day of marriage, which shall first happen, 
then the Heed yard with the appurtenances shall come and be to my said 
son John Taylor &c. But if my said son shall refuse to pay the said sum 
of two hundred pounds unto my said grandchild at the time herein before 
limited for the payment thereof and yet shall have desire to occupy and 
make use of the same yard then and in such case my will is that my said 
son shall pay the yearly rent of twenty pounds to my graudson for and 
during the time he shall so hold and use the same. But if my said grand- 
child shall happen to die before such his arrival at age or marriage, and 
withont issue of his body lawfully begotten, then and in such case I give 
the same to my said sou John Taylor and the heirs of his body lawfully 
begotten &c, and, for want of such heirs, to such of my daughter Arnold's 
children as shall then be living (except my son John shall before his death 
give or " ascertaine " to my daughter Arnold's children two hundred pounds, 
which if he do then it shall be lawful for him to dispose of the said yard at 
his pleasure). I give to my said son John Taylor and Rebecca his now 
wife my three fifths parts of and in all those seveial houses, yavd and 
dock, in Wapping, the fee simple whereof I lately bought (viz 1 .) one fifth 
part of Mr. John Woolhouse and the other two fifths of Mr. John Kemp- 
sail, to have and to hold to the said John Taylor and Rebecca his wife for 
their lives and that of the longest liver of them and then to their children, 
part and part aake. But if my said son John happen to die without heirs 
of his body then I give and bequeath the reversion of the premisses (after 
the death of said Rebecca) to be equally divided among my said daughter 
Arnold's five children or those of them then living. I give to son John 
and his wife my right &c. in four houses &c. which I hold by lease from 
Mr. John Catlin, being of the yearly rent of forty eight pounds, I give &c. 
to Elizabeth and Johanna, the daughters of 'my sou Joseph Taylor four hun- 
dred pounds apiece, to be paid, for them, into the hands of Mr. Gregory 
Page, Mr. Thomas Hayter and Mr. James Porter, as trustees and guardians 
till they shall arrive at the age of one or twenty years or be married. 
Other bequests to the said children. When disposed of in marriage or 
arrived at said age they are to have their portions if they carry themselves 
civilly, and not before. Provisions in case of their death. These childrens' 
portions of eight hundred pounds shall be paid out of the debt of one 
thousand one hundred and -eventeen pounds which is owing me from the 
City for building the ship Loyal London &c. I give to my three grand- 
children Thomas, John and Samuel Arnold two hundred pounds apiece, to 



976 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

he paid into the hands of my said Trustees, one moiety thereof out of my 
cash in house aud the other moiety out of my said City deht. The children 
to be paid at one and twenty years of age or marriage. To my grand- 
daughter Elizabeth Haddilow one hundred and fifty pounds, and my will is 
that her husband Haddilow shall have nothing to do with it. I give to Mary 
Arnold one hundred pounds over and besides what I gave her at the time 
of her marriage. To my grandchild John Taylor one hundred pounds at 
cwne and twenty or day of marriage. To my grandchild Abigail Jennings 
five pounds more than what she hath already had of me, to be paid her 
out of the said City debt. To my grandchild Rebecca Taylor, daughter 
of my son John, one hundred pounds at one and twenty or day of marriage, 
but if she die before then I give the same to her sisters and brothers^ if 
she then have any, and if none then to her mother. I give to Jonathan 
Taylor, son of my son John, that one fifth part of the said houses, dock and 
yard which I also bought of the said John Kempsall and his mother in 
law besides the said first three parts of the same premisses above devised. 
Item, I give to my grandson Jonathan Willoughbie one hundred pounds, 
fifty pounds thereof to be paid within three months next after my decease 
out of my own money and the other fifty pounds out of my City debt. I 
give to Nehemiah Willoughbie fifty pounds and to William Willoughby 
thirty pounds and the sum of five pounds apiece to the two children of my 
son in law Mr Francis Willoughbie which he had by this his last wife. 
Item, whereas there is yet due unto me from and out of my brother Wil- 
loughbie's estate the full sum of sixty pounds. Now I do hereby give the 
same and all my right, title and interest therein to my three grand children 
Jonathan, Nehemiah and William Willoughby, to be equally divided 
amongst them. It is my further will and meaning that the legacies herein 
before given to my son Willoughbie's four children last before mentioned 
(that is to say) Nehemiah, William and his said two children by this his 
last wife, shall be paid unto them within ten months next after my decease. 
Provided always that their father, Mr. Francis Willoughby do first give a 
full and general release to my executors of all accompts, debts and demands 
whatsoever, except only in matters about the trade wherein I am concerned 
with Sir William Warren, touching which affair I desire Mr. Gregory Page 
to see that right be done unto me and my executors. I give to my grand 
daughter Sarah Camfeild the sum of sixty pounds to be paid unto her out 
my City debt so soon as the same can be received. I give and bequeath unto 
Owen Taylor the sum of ten pounds and to his brothers and sisters twenty 
shillings apiece. I give unto my cousin Caleb Taylor forty shillings and 
to each of my servants that shall be with me at the time of my decease 
twenty shillings apiece. I do give unto forty ministers in a list named and 
here inclosed twenty shillings apiece. I give unto M r . Ryder ten pounds. I 
give twenty pounds to Captain Potter, William Hooper and Thomas French, 
to be distributed and disposed of by them and others of my Christian friends 
in Wapping. with whom in a special manner I walked and had Christian 
society in my life time, being met together &c. My executor to pay forty 
shillings for a dinner to be had at such their meeting together upon that 
occasion. I give forty pounds to be distributed amongst poor suffering 
godly ministers who are laid aside and cannot hold their liberties for 
preaching whereby they got their livelihoods. To my daughter Rebecca 
Taylor thirty pounds as a token of my love to her. To my said three trustees 
ten pounds apiece as a token of my love to them. To my daughter in 
law Hannah ten pounds in case she survive two months next after 









GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1)77 

my decease. To Mrs. Judith Bowrey and Mrs. Jorden ten pounds apiece. 
I make my son John Taylor executor. Penn, 29. 

[According to the foregoing will Mr. Taylor seems to have been the maternal 
grandfather of four of Gov. Willoughby's children, viz. : Jonathan, Nehemiah 

and William Willoughby and Sarah Camfleld. The two children of Gov. Wil- 
loughby by his last wife, referred to by this testator, were, I suppose, Francis 
and Susanna, who also, it may be noted, were mentioned in the will of their 
aunt Jane Locke, giveu in my Gleanings for July 1893 (Reg., Vol. 47, p. 418; 
ante, p. 763). Mr-Thomas Bragne, whose name appears in that Declaration of 
Trust which I have referred to, married Hannah Locke, another sister of Mrs. 
Margaret Willoughby. Ou pp. 415-41G of the same number of the Register 
(ante, p. 761) may be found the will of John Dersley of Stepney, who mentions 
John Taylor of Wapping as occupying certain tenements in Wapping in which 
Mr. Dersley had an interest. He was undoubtedly the father of the John and 
Thomas Dearsly referred to in M r . Taylor's will and was the father, likewise, 
of Anne the wife of Mr. William Ting. As he mentioned also Capt. Edward 
Johnson and as the Johnsons of Kent were evidently connected with the Locke 
family, to which Gov. Willoughby's last wife belonged, I think I have, in these 
two groups of wills (i. e. those now presented and the wills given on pp. 415-418 
of Reg. for July, 1893; ante, pp. 761-63) introduced the reader to an interesting 
connection of New England families. 

I find that Admon. was granted 20 January 1680 to Matthew Todd, principal 
creditor of Jonathan AVilloughby, lately of the parish of St. Catherine, Coleman 
Street, London, but at Tangier, in the parts beyond the seas deceased, to admin- 
ister the goods &c. of the said deceased, Elizabeth Willoughby, his relict, first 
renouncing. Henry F. Waters.] 

Roger Cole of the parish of St. Saviour, South wark, Surrey, gen 1 . 2 
September 1G25, confirmed 14 July 1626 in a codicil of that date, proved 
3 May 1628. My wife Anne shall have all my lands, tenements and 
hereditaments &c. (luring her life, and after her decease I give my mansion 
house and the garden house belonging &c, now in my occupation, in the 
said parish, unto Susan Lock my daughter, during her life, and after her 
decease to the children of her body lawfully begotten or to be begotten", 
equally amongst them or their lawful issue, charged nevertheless with five 
pjounds yearly which I give to Mary Clemence my ancient servant, during 
her life, from and after the decease of my wife. I give the rooms &c, par- 
cel of the messuage now in the occupation of Katherine Simons widow, in 
the said parish which late were in the occupation of William Oland my 
late son in law deceased, unto Elizabeth my daughter his late wife, during 
her life and after her decease to her lawfully begotten children. The rest 
of the said messuage I give unto Catalina Johnson my daughter, during 
her life, and after her decease to her lawfully begotten children. Pro- 
visional bequests to the Free Grammar School of the same parish, the poor 
of the College of the same parish and the poor of the Liberty of the Clink. 
All the deeds, evidences &c. concerning the said messuages &c. shall, after 
the decease of my wife, remain in the hands and custody of my said daughter 
Susannna Lock for the good of the parties concerned. To my daughter 
Elizabeth an annuity of four pounds to be issuing out of my mansion house 
and garden house &c. 

In the Codicil ten pounds apiece to each of the three children of daugh- 
ter Elizabeth, like sums to each of the five children of daughter Susanna, 
forty shillings apiece (for rings) to sons in law William Lock, John John- 
son and William Ayscough, the seal ring "I usually weare" to cousin Ed- 
ward Cole of Winchester, forty shillings (for a ring) to brother Olave 
Masters &c. Wife Anne to be sole executrix. Harrington, 46. 

[The above testator was the M r . Roger Cole referred to in will of William 



i> 78 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Lock published iu my Gleanings for July 1893 (Reg. Vol. 47, p. 417; ante, p. 
7G3). He was the maternal grandfather of Mrs. Margaret Willoughby. 

H. F. Waters.] 

John White ah Wampers late of Boston in New England, mariner, 
5 September 1079, proved 1 October 1G7'.». I do give, devise and bequeath 
unto my very loving kinsmau John a Wonsamock, Pomhamell and Nor- 
warunnt all that my estate lying and being in New England, commonly 
called or known by the name of Assenham East-stock, and all lands, plan- 
tations, &c — thereunto belonging &c, to have, hold and enjoy unto them 
and their heirs for ever, they and every of them observing &c. all such 
articles and conditions as rav father and I have or ought to have observed 
&c. 

I give &c. to my very loving friend George Owen of the parish of S l . 
Alhallowes the Wall (sic) in London, Chirurgeon, four hundred acres of 
that my land situate &c. in Bedford in New England, which said land doth 
abut upon the lands of Nicholas Warner. 

I give &c. to my very loving friends Edward Pratt of St. Paul, Shad- 
well, Middlesex, victualler, and John Blake of Plymouth in New England, 
husbandman, the rest and remainder of my lands, tenements, plantations, 
grounds, feedings, pastures and hereditaments whatsoever &c. &c. iu the 
Country of New England or elsewhere. And I give them all my goods 
and chattels and make them joint executors &.c. 

Proved by the oath of John Blake, one of the executors named in the 
will, to whom was administration &c, power reserved of making a similar 
grant to Edward Pratt, the other executor when he should come to seek it. 

King, 136. 

[In the Probate Act Book testator is called John White lately of Boston in 
New England, but on a voyage (in intinere) in the parish of Stepney, Middlesex, 
deceased. The reference to this will was given me by my late friend, Mr. 
Francis Grigson many years ago. H. F. W. 

This will is that of one who doubtless was one of the first of the pupils of 
John Eliot, the Apostle. He was brought to Eliot by his father, also named 
Wampus, requesting he be educated by the English and taught to be obe- 
dient. The first part of the request seems to have been accomplished, as Wam- 
pus became proficient in English ways and customs. Through his knowledge 
of English his relatives and other Indians gave him authority to look after their 
land interests, and the attention lie bestowed on the matter evidently gave him 
an idea that he had an ownership in the same, as evidenced by his will and vari- 
ous documents, among which may be mentioned those in the Mass. Archives, 
in which are given depositions on the subject by different Indians, as early as 
1G72. His wife, whose name was Ann Fraske, was the daughter of llomanock, 
the sachem of Aspatuck and Sasquaugh (Fairfield, Conn.), and through this 
marriage, which is recorded in the Boston records, he claimed rights there 
which were a subject of correspondence between the Connecticut authorities 
and the home government, and proceedings were pending in Connecticut at the 
time of Wampus's death. 

His wife Ann's estate was probated in Suffolk County, Ma<s., in 1G7G, aud the 
couple also had property in Boston, as evidenced by the Suffolk Deeds. 

The will mentions land in New England, which the writer of the will calls 
Assenham East-stock, this is Assanamascoek of the Nipmug country, or the 
Hassanamisco Indian tract, and this is the key to the Sutton (Mass.) Indian 
grant, which solution evidently escaped the reverend authors of the history of 
that town. This bequest was the subject of much controversy in the Massa- 
chusetts General Court, and was finally settled in favor of the Indian grantees 
through the admission of the Dudley family to an interest and share in the 
grant. The fable of Sutton deriving its name from a Dr. Sutton who kindly 
ministered to Wampus on a return voyage from England, and that Wampus 
suggested the name through gratitude, hardly looks plausible, as Wampus had 
been dead a quarter of a century before Sutton received its name. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 979 

Wampus was imprisoned in England for debt, in Massachusetts for riotous 
and unruly conduct, and breaking jail in Boston, created excitement at Cam- 
bridge meeting-house in King Philip's War by his behayior. 

The story of his Life and adventures make a more lengthy article than this 
note will allow, and seems to have escaped the notice of previous writers. Mr. 
Drake, in his History of the Indians, does not mention him, and Savage, in his 
Genealogical Dictionary, makes but a line of mention. 

Walter K. Watkins.] 

Washington (Register, vol. 43, pp. 379-424, ante, pp. 352-404): — 

[The Hartford Courant for September 30, 1894, has an article with the title 
" An Account of an Ancient Document with the Washington Arms," from which 
we quote : "The Courant has the privilege of giving an account of two docu- 
ments of great interest and i^reat value which have lately come into the posses- 
sion of James J. Goodwin, Esq. One of them bears the signature of a remote 
ancestor of General Washington as a witness to a deed of quit-claim, the other 
is a deed or lease executed by the same ancestor and his son, and bearing on 
one of its seals, in an admirable state of preservation, the Washington arms." 
Then follow some remarks on Mr. Waters's discoveries printed in the Register 
at the above reference, a description of the two documents, and remarks 
suggested by them. The deed with the Washington arms is a lease for two 
thousand years, on the payment of one red rose each St. John the Baptist's day, 
of land in Sulgrave. It is dated 43 Elizabeth and signed by Robert Washington 
and Lawrence Washington. "The deeds were found," says the Courant, "in 
searching among a heap of documents belonging to certain ladies, and a friend 
of theirs showed them to Mr. J. C. C. Smith of the Probate Registry, Somerset 
House, London Through Mr. Smith they came to their present owner." 

The Courant adds : "The New York Tribune of the 19th instant gives from 
the London Times a long account by Ernest G. Atkinson, of certain depositions 
found in the Exchequer Records bearing on matters connected with the Wash- 
ington family. The first witness named is Anne Washington, widow of Robert 
Washington, and the name Pargiter also occurs. The whole article is of in- 
terest, but if the writer had had before him the genealogical chart prepared by 
Mr. Waters which accompanies his paper, . ...he would have seen that he was 
looking for the descent of the emigrants of Virginia along a wrong line." 

Editor.] 

Abraham Halsted of Rotterdam, merchant, 5 April 1651, proved 2 
May 1651. I do ordain Darkes Halsted my wife and William Schapes my 
brother, merchant, jointly executors and to choose a third person to their 
assistance as they shall agree upon. My debts first to be paid. To my 
wife Darkes one full third part of my remaining estate. One other third to 
my two sons Abraham and Isaac, equally to be divided between them. I 
give and bequeath unto my sister in New England five and twenty pounds 
sterling, and if she be dead to the nearest of her friends there. To Rebecca 
Wliiternan my wife's sister fifty pounds sterling. To the three children of 
William Cochroft deceased each ten pounds. To the poor of the church in 
general thirty pounds. To my wife's brother James Whiteman twenty 
pounds. My servant Lister. To the children of my brother Armye and 
brother Cocke (Cooke?) each child ten pounds. To my former wife's 
mother Mrs Rebecca Kinge five pounds. To the children of Mr Davies 
my father in law each five pounds. To my brother William Scapes twenty 
five pounds. To Gemiiiell his children each five pounds. 

Proved at London by the oath of _ Dorcas Whitman ah Halsted, one of 
the executors &c. reserving power to the other executor. Grey, 88. 

Richard Cutt of Portsmouth in Piscataqua 10 May, 1 075, proved 11 
July 1G82. To my wife Elinor Cutt my now dwelling house with the 
bake house, brew house, barn and all housing thereunto belonging, with log 
warehouse and whuifing (my storehouse warehouse only excepted), to- 



980 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

gether with my garden, orchard aud all the laud in fence in the home field 
adjoining to my house, as also my corn mill with my house and barns up at 
the creek, with all the upland and meadow thereunto belonging so far as 
home unto that land which I bought of Ilubertus Mattoon (excepting the 
tan yard and the building thereunto belonging and the land on that side of 
the floorn). All these to my wife during her natural life and after her de- 
cease I give and bequeath the whole estate aforesaid unto my grandson Cutt 
Vaughan, to be to him and his heirs forever. And it shall come into his 
hands at the a"e of twenty one years, with remainder to the next heir male 
and if there be no heir male then to the next heir that shall survive. To 
wife (certain household stuff) with all my stock of cattle and the five negro 
servants. To my daughter Margaret Vaughan my stone warehouse and 
that part of the wood field joining to that which was John Pickering's and 
reaching home to William Ilearls on the West with mv brother John Cutt 
also on the West, the way that goes to the Creek on the North and Chris- 
topher Jose on the East, together with the tanyard, housing and stock 
therein and the little field on the South of the floome, always excepting and 
reserving the highway as it is now to the farm and to the other mill, which 
is to be kept free for the use of the mill and the houses by it; all which I 
give to my daughter Margaret and her children, if tbey fail then to my 
daughter Bridget and hers. To mv daughter Bridget and her heirs 1 give 
the remainder of that field commonly called the Great Field, to say all be- 
sides what is already given to her and her husband and already sold to 
sundry persons. I give her also that part of the wood field on the South 
of the highway unto the Creek as it is now fenced. The other part be- 
tween the highway and the creek her mother shall have liberty to use 
during her natural life; and that part also shall be Bridget's after her 
mother's decease. Likewise I give to Bridget my land in the Long Reach 
next to that which was Cap* Pendleton's, being thirty three poles broad 
front on the River and so back the whole depth; this to Bridget aud her 
heirs, with remainder to the heirs of her sister Margaret. To son William 
Vaughan my land on the great Island bought of Mr. Mason and that acre, 
given me by the town, which was laid out with an acre of Mr. Fryer's. I 
give him also two hundred pounds out of my estate and also my housing at 
the Isle of Shoals on Starr Island, together with that estate, both in stock 
aud debts, that is in partnership with him. To beloved son Thomas Daniell 
two hundred pounds. To my grandson Cutt Vaughan one hundred pounds. 
To my grandchild Elinor Vaughan the house and land I bought of Mr 
Mattoon, with that part of my land that comes from the "Pulpit, the whole 
breadth of Mattoon's land till it come to my brother John Cutt's land on 
the North, together with two hundred pounds. To my grandchild Mary 
Vaughan two hundred pounds in money and the one hundred and fifty acres 
of land and the meadow belonging to it as I bought of Edward Hilton, as 
appears by bill of sale of John Wedgetts. 

I will further that what remains of my twenty pounds per annum, sub- 
scribed as a gift to the College for myself and sons, be carefully discharged 
by my executors. 

I give to my brother John Cutt ten pounds, to buy him mourning, and 
ten pounds to his wife and five pounds to each of his children. I give to 
my sister Anne Shipway ten pounds to buy her mourning, and five pounds 
to my brother Shipway and five pounds to his son John Shipway. I give 
to my brother Robert Cutts' widow and to each of his five children five 
pounds, as also I do forgive the debt due on my book. To Mr Joshua 












GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 981 

Moodey thirty pounds and to his five children ten pounds, i.e. forty shil- 
lings each. To my cousin John Hole and his wife five pounds each. To 
the church of Portsmouth ten pounds to buy a piece of plate for the use of 
the church. Wife Eiianor and my two daughters Margaret and Bridget to 
be executors and brother John Cutt, Mr Joshua Moodey aud sons William 
Vauffhan aud Thomas Daniel overseers. 

John Wincoll and John Fletcher attest as witnesses. Cottle, 82. 

William Blick, of St. Martin's in the Fields within the City and 
Liberties of Westminster in the County of Middlesex, gentleman, 27 July 
1720, proved 2 January 1724. To be privately but decently buried at the 
discretion of my loving wife Elizabeth Blick. I am possessed of six several 
messuages and tenements in St. James Street in the parish of St. James 
Westminster for a certain term of years yet to come and unexpired. I 
give the same to my wife for life, charged nevertheless with the several 
payments mentioned in the last will of Mrs Jane Wilkinson late of St. 
James Westminster deceased, bearing date 20 July 1 7 1 8, as follows ; twenty 
five pounds per annum to Philadelphia Pope, wife of John Pope, for her 
life, and after her decease twenty pounds per annum to her husband John 
Pope if he survive her, and also twenty pounds per annum to Ann Par- 
tridge, daughter of the said Philadelphia Pope and wife of John Partridge,* 
during her life, in case the said term of years in the said premises shall so 
long continue. And in case my dear wife should die before the end of the 
said term I give the unexpired residue of said term to my sou William 
Blick. [I give to my son W m Blick twenty pounds, to my eldest daughter 
Elizabeth Barnes wife of Daniel Barnes twenty pounds, to my daughter 
Susannah Blick twenty pounds, to my son in law W m Richardson, son of 
my wife Elizabeth Blick by her former husband, five pounds.]! I give to 
Elizabeth Godwin now in Virginia, daughter of my wife Elizabeth Blick 
by her former husband, ten pounds to pay for her passage back into Eng- 
land &c. 1 give to my beloved friend William CookeJ a gold ring, value 
ten shillings and also my cane with a black studded head. To my son 
William my linen and Woollen apparell. The residue to my wife Eliza- 
beth whom I appoint executrix &c. 

Then follows a deposition of one of the subscribing witnesses (dated 30 
December 1724) certifying as to the several obliterations and alterations. 

Romney, 1. 

I am indebted for reference to the above, as well as for others of the same 
period, to H. W. F. Harwood, Esq. — Henry F. Waters. 

Agnes Hackham (of Membury) 2G February 1605, proved 10 Decem- 
ber 1608. To be buried in the churchyard of Membury. To my daughter 
Johane Palfrey my sidesaddle with a covering belonging to the same, my 
best gown, my second beat petticoat, my second best partlett, my best apron 
and my second best waistcoat and fifty shillings in money, which sum is in 
the hands of William Palfrey the now husband of the said Johane. I give 
to Marrian Clape my daughter my third best gown, my third best petticoat 
&c. and fifty shillings in money. To Agnes Palfrey my daughter my second 
best gown, my fourth best partlett &c &c. and fifty shillings. I give to 

* This bequest to Mrs. Fartridge has been ruled through with a pen, and on the margin 
of page against it there is written " My grandson W m Blick, My grand daughter Elizabeth 
Nye, to Eliz. Godwin now in Boston New England." 

t These bequests within brackets have been ruled through with a pen. 

X This bequest to William CooUc has also been ruled through. 



982 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Peter Palfrey, my daughter's son, one iron cronck. To my (laughter Ellen 
&c. J give also to Agnes and Marie (sic) my daughters one foslett of 
linen, to be divided betwixt them, and either of them a holidays smock. I 
give to my four daughters four saucers of tin, to either of them one. The 
rest of mine apparel to my four daughters (equally). Gifts to sons in law 
William Palfrey and Walter Hackham. My godchildren. The poor in 
Membury. Agnes Hackham, my sou's daughter. Nicholas Bagbere, 
curate. Son Walter Hackham to be executor. 

Richard Davye a witness. Windebanck, 110. 

Edward Palmer, of London and late of Lemington in the County of 
Glocester Esq.. 22 November 1G24, proved 15 December 1624. To the 
parish church of Todenham, towards the reparations of the same and of the 
chapel belonging to Lemington house, commonly called the Place, in the 
parish of Todenham, where I was born, forty shillings. A seemly monu- 
ment to be erected in the same chapel for a memory of John Palmer Esq., 
my late grandfather, and of Mary his wife, sister of William Grivell, one 
of the Judges of the Common Pleas, and of Sir Giles Grivell, knight, both 
Jong since deceased. To my daughter Margaret Elton five pounds (in a 
piece of plate). To my daughter Mary a piece of plate of same value. 
Another to my daughter Charlton and another to my daughter Rutter. To 
my sou Richard Palmer seven hundred pounds, in hope my said son will 
provide for the good education and maintenance of Bridget his only child 
and daughter. Reference to indentures between testator, Lisley Cave Esq. 
and others. Reference to the bargain and sale of the manor of Over Lem- 
ington, sold by my father to Richard Palmer of Berton, gentleman, my 
wife's father. The manor of Nether Lemington sold by myself to the said 
Richard Palmer. Certain assurances and releases of the manor of Middle 
Ditchford to Ralph Sheldon Esq. from my father and others. Certain 
entails thereof heretofore made by my grandfather and my uncle William 
Palmer, sometime one of the gentlemen pensioners to King Henry VIII. 
and Edw. VI. The manor of Churchhill sold by my father to Sir Chris- 
topher Ilatton, knight. My son Giles Palmer to be sole executor, or, if he 
die, then my son Thomas Palmer. For supervisors I appoint Sir Giles 
Overbury, knight, Sir Matthew Palmer, knight, George Lascells Esq., 

Laurence Maidewell Esq., Mr Lea, citizen of London, and Richard 

Croftes, gentleman, to each of whom a ring of gold of four angels. And 
my will and mind is that if I shall happen to give unto my said son Richard 
the sum of two thousand pounds or more out of my profits of Virginia and 
New England, then the seven hundred pounds (as aforesaid) shall not be 
charged upon my personal estate &c. And as touching my castles, manors, 
lands, tenements and hereditaments which now or hereafter shall be built 
and erected in Virginia or New England in the parts beyond the seas I 
give the same to my son Giles &c. with remainder to my son Thomas &c, 
then to Edward Palmer only son of my brother William. And for default 
of all such issue males &c. all the aforesaid castles, lands &c. shall be and 
remain for the founding and maintenance of an University and such schools 
in Virginia as shall be there erected and shall be called ACADEMIA 
VIRGINIENSIS ET OXONIENSIS and shall be divided into several 
streets or alleys of twenty foot broad; and all such as can prove their law- 
ful descent from John Palmer Esq. of Lemington aforesaid, my 

grandfather deceased, or from my Into grandmother, his wife, being sons, 
shall be there freely admitted and shall be brought up in such schools as 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 983 

shall be fit for their age and learning and shall be removed from time to 
time as they shall profit in knowledge and understanding. And further my 
will is that the scholars of the said University, for avoiding of idleness at 
their hours of recreation, shall have two painters, the one for oil colours and 
the other for water colours, which shall be admitted Fellows in the same 
College. And further my will and mind is that two grinders, the one for 
oil colours and the other for water colours, and also colours, oil and gum 
waters shall be provided from time to time at the costs and charges of the 
said College, beseeching God to add a blessing to all these my intents. 

Byrde, 114. 

George Shurt of Bideford, Devon, merchant, 9 February 1655, with 
a codicil dated 6 May 1057, proved 11 June 1658. To my sister in law 
Mary Shurt. widow, who was wife unto my brother John Shurt, and her 
heir all that house and tenement in the High Street wherein sometime 
Robert Chape (sic) lived, with the garden belonging, wherein I have granted 
an estate and term of two lives, and the rent thereof ten shillings per an- 
num, which house is in the possession of Robert Choape (sic) butcher. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my brother Abraham Shurt now in New 
England, God send him home from thence to live in Bedford (sic), all that 
new house and tenement &c. or the new Key, to hold for life after his re- 
turn. To my cousin John Efford the younger, now living and being in our 
house, that house &c. in High Street wherein Heury Amory now liveth. 
To my cousin George Efford, my godson, brother unto the said John, now 
beinc ''tabled" with John Mugford in the parish of Abbotisham, the house 
&c. wherein William Davye lately lived, in the High Street, next adjoining 
unto the house on the High side (sic) wherein my uncle Andrew did live 
sometime. My wife to be a mother to these two (John and George Efford) 
until of age. To the town of Bideford ten pounds to be lent to five poor 
artificers, forty shillings each for one whole year. To my cousin John Ford 
the elder of Burrington, to Dorothy, his wife, to my cousin Margery Pen- 
rose of Chumlye (sic) widow, my cousin Sibilla Curry, the wife of William 
Curry of Hols'worthy, to each of them a gold ring of twenty five shillings 
with a death's head thereon. John Ford, the eldest son of the said John, 
and every other of his children. The children of my cousin Margery Pen- 
rose. The children of my sister Johaue Purser deceased which lived in 
Brampton. My cousin Francis Facy of our town, town clerk, and Francis 
Havdon, my brother in law who married my wife's sister. Each of my 
apprentices. Edward Gurst, water bayliff of our town, and Johaue Rigg 
widow. Master Johnson of our to-wn who was schoolmaster therein. John 
Efford the elder of Littleham. Master Shibber and Master Petter, Doctor. 
Wife Margaret. Abraham Heyman, her son, now in the island Fayall. 
Richard Guy son unto George Guy of Torrington deceased, whose mother 
married with Master Richard Medford of Barnstable. My godson George 
son of Gabriel Shurt of Littleham. Wootton, 301. 

[Abraham Shurt. who is named by testator as a brother, was early at Perna- 
quid. See a valuable article on " Abraham Shurt and John Earthy," by the late 
Prof. John Johnston, LL.D., in the Register for April, 1871, pp. 131-135.— 
Editor.] 

Kkmpo Sybada of London, mariner, 19 March 1658, proved 18 April 
1659. To my daughter Anne Sibada, in case she shall prove a dutiful and 
obedient child unto her mother (my executrix hereafter named) fifteen 
pounds at age of twenty one, to be paid out of my estate in England, Hoi- 






984 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

land and other parts of the Low Countries. And concerning my lands, 
houses and plantations in Africa (To wit in New England and Jameco (sic), 
I give one eighth part thereof to my said daughter, when the same shall be 
obtained and°recovered (less the proportionate cost of collecting &c). My 
loving friends Capt. John Wentworth of Bermudas, at present residing in 
Loudon, mariner, and John Penny of London, mariner, commander of the 
good ship called the America, to be overseers and ffeoffees in trust of this 
my will. The residue to wife Mary, whom I appoint sole executrix. 

Pell, 189. 

[I am indebted to Mr. W. S. Appleton for the reference to the above will, 
and also to that of George Shurt. H. F. Waters.] 

George Rayment of the parish of St. John's in Glaston in the Co. of 
Somerset, 26 June 1651, proved 30 October 1651. My body to be buried 
iu the churchvard of St. John's &c. To my daughter Dorothy Robyns 
and her child forty shillings, and all the goods that I have in the house that 
I lived in, in the churchyard, I give to said daughter Dorothy Robins, and 
my best breeches and jacket and my best shoes to my daughter Dorothy's 
husband of Streete. To the wife of my son Maurice Rayment and her 
child forty shillings. 

Item, I give and bequeath to William Rayment my son that is in New 
England six pounds, to be paid if ever he doth come to Glastou to demand 
it. Item, I give and bequeath to Elizabeth Rayment my daughter that is 
in New England twenty shillings, to be paid if ever she doth come to 
Glaston to demand it. To John Seemer, the son of William Seemer, 
twenty shillings. To Luce Seemer. the daughter of William Seemer of 
the said Glaston, twenty shillings. Twenty shillings I give to discharge 
my funeral expences. All the rest of my goods &c. I give to Maurice 
Rayment my son, whom I make my whole and sole executor. For over- 
seers I do appoint William Seemer and William Billocks. (Then follows 
the date.) Item, I give to John Rayment my son that is in New England 
one shilling. 

The witnesses were William Seemer, William Zealee (by mark) and 
George Rosier. Grey, 196. 

[Here we have the familv of William and old John Rayment of Beverly, well 
known to searchers of the records at Salem. And I am glad to see the spelling 
conform to the pronunciation as I remember it from earliest childhood. Present 
representatives of that family now write their name Raymond. There was a 
Richard Raymond of Salem, who lived on the south side of Essex Street, and 
afterwards removed to Norwalk and Saybrook. But I have never seen the 
slightest evidence of a relationship between him and these Payments of Beverly. 
The above will confirms me in this. I cannot, here and now, without my Essex 
Co. notes, tell what became of Elizabeth Rayment, the sister of William ami 
John, who also went to New England. Perhaps some of my friends at home 
(for instance the Hon. John I. Baker) may be able to tell us. John Rayment, 
I believe, succeeded to the ownership of the farm belonging once to Thomas 
Scruggs, one of the Old Planters, and the old Rayment house (I hope) stands 
there to-day. I have often passed it in my walks. Henry F. Waters.] 

Thomas Smith of West Clandon, Surrey, yeoman, 13 June 1651, proved 
28 October 1651. To the poor of West Clandon fifty shillings and to the 
poor of Cranley, Surrey, fifty shillings. Item, I give and bequeath to my 
brother John Smyth, now in New England (if he shall be then living) sixty 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 985 

pounds within one year after my decease, and in case he be dead before 
that time then I give the said sixty pounds to my cousin Rachael, daughter 
of my said brother John Smyth, and to her heirs, to be paid within one 
year &c. To my sister Susanna, widow of my brother Jeremy Smyth de- 
ceased, five pounds (in one 3'ear). To my cousin Richard, son of my brother 
John Smyth, five pounds (in one year). To my cousin Thomas, son of my 
brother Jeremye Smyth deceased, fifty pounds (in one year). To my 
brother William Smith fifty pounds, in one year, if he shall then be living, 
but if not then his wife shall have ten pounds of it and the other forty 
pounds shall be equally divided between the children of my brothers John 
and Jeremie aforesaid, to be paid in one year &c. To each of my god- 
children two shillings and six pence, to be paid within half a year &c. I 
do appoint my cousin Jeremy Smith, sou of my brother Jeremy deceased, 
my sole executor, to whom all the residue, and if he be dead then his chil- 
dren shall be joint executors. My very loving friends Mr Thomas Mascall 
of West C'andon and Richard Ticknor of Holhurst in the parish of Crauley 
to be overseers. And I bequeath unto either of them fifty shillings for their 
pains and such necessary charges as they shall be at. 

Proved at Loudon, by the oath of Jeremy Smith the nephew and only 
executor named in the will. Grey, 197. 

Samuel Hitchins, citizen and draper of London, 16 March 1676, with 
a Codicil made 27 July 1679, proved 3 December 1679. To my dear and 
loving wife Sarah my two messuages &c. in the parish of St. Lawrence old 
Jewry, London, which I hold by lease from the Company of Clothworkers, 
and if she die before the expiration of the term &c. then to my son Giles 
Hitchins or to my grandson Robert Hitchins, which of them my said wife 
shall think fit to give or bequeath the same. To wife ra3 r freehold mes- 
suages in Robin Hood Court, St. Mary Aldermary, London, and the rents 
&c. for her life, and then to my grandson Robert Hitchins, remainder to 
son Giles Hitchins and next to my two nephews Daniel and Joseph Hitchins 
(sons of my brother Daniel Hitchins) who are now living in New England 
near Boston. To my loving brother Daniel Hitchins one annuity of ten 
pounds for life, payable quarterly. To my nephew Nathaniel Hitchins one 
shilling in full discharge of all claims &c. To my son Giles Hitchins my 
freehold messuages &c. in All Hallows Barking. Reference to stock and 
credits abroad. The said messuages to be chargeable with the ten pounds 
per annum given to my brother Daniel and also with the payment of one 
and thirty pounds per annum unto my loving cousin Robert Hitchins for 
and during the term of his natural life, according 'to certain writings be- 
tween the said Robert and me. To my said brother Daniel and my said 
cousin Robert to each of them four yards of black cloth to make them 
mourning. To my said cousin Robert and to my loving friends M r Daniel 
Morse and Nicholas Morse, son of the said Daniel, twenty shillings apiece 
to buy them rings. The residue to wife Sarah, with five pounds to buy her 
mourning. My said cousin Robert and my friends Daniel and Nicholas 
Morse to be executors. King, 1 t»l. 

[Here we have indicated plainly enough the Daniel and Joseph Hitchins whose 
names are to be found on the records of Lynn, Massachusetts, and of JSssex 
County, at Salem. Henry F. Waters.! 

Mart Coquell alias Le Mercier dwelling in the town of Rochell, 
widow of the late Martin Winder Bist merchant, also there dwelling, her 



986 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

will made 27 February 1608 (and translated out of the French) proved 3 
November 1G31. My body to my friends and kindred to the end they may 
take care for my burial, with credit and ceremony requisite to a woman 
of my quality, according to the form and custom of the Reformed Church, 
whereof I do make profession. To the poor of this place if I die in this 
town to the poor of the French Church fifty L. tournois. To the poor of 
the Hospital fifty L. tournois. More to the advancement of the ministry 
fifty L. tournois. More to the box of the Dutch poor fifty L. tournois. 
More to the son of late Henry Vanlo my godson forty L. tournois, if he 
die nothing. More to the son of Quemond Van Wert, also my godson, 
forty L. tournois, if he die nothing. Similar bequests to Hellen Vanlo, my 
late husband's god daughter and to the son of John Chanan, named Gyles, 
my godson. To the son of the widow Bloc, named John, also my godson, 
one hundred Lyvers, and if he die and that his mother be living the same 
shall be given unto his said mother, for she hath many children. More to 
a girl which doth serve me named Rachel de la Loy, in respect of the love 
which I do bear her, I do also give her one hundred L. tournois, if she die 
nothing. More unto Mr and Mrs de Vogel dwelling in this town, in regard 
of the good and hearty friendship which we have borne one another, I do 
give them fifteen hundred Livers to give unto their children, which as seven 
in number, unto every one of them two hundred Lyvers and one hundred 
Livers unto the said M ns de Vogell, and unto her my diamond cut " fasset" 
which I do wear upon my little finger, and whether any of their children 
do die or not I do will and understand that the said sum of fifteen hundred 
Lyvers shall be given unto them for the bettering of the part of the others 
or so much as shall be to remain unto the fathers or mother, and if the said 
M ris de Vogel do die the said diamond shall be given to one of their daugh- 
ters, that is to say to Sara or Katherine or Anne, and if one die the other 
shall succeed, or unto Susan if the others be dead, who is also their sister, 
fifteen hundred L. And if the said Mr and Mris de Vogell do die I pray 
you enquire where their said children are, to the end you may cause the 
said sum and the said diamond to be delivered unto them. More unto the 
nephew of my late husband, named Martin Vauder Bist, who hath dwelt 
with us from the age of seven or eight years, in regard of the love that I 
do bear him I do give him five hundred Lyvers tournois and a ring of his 
deceased uncle's set with a red stone cut like a " harte" which did serve 
for a seal to his said uncle, and if he die nothing to his heirs. 
Moreover to my brethren and sisters. 
First unto my brother Paul le Mercier who hath not auy charge and is 
not married, being by the grace of God in very good estate, and hath not 
any need of my succession but for remembrance of me, I do give him my 
great diamond which is set in a ring of gold and which I wear upon my 
first finger, being a stone which hath been always esteemed at five hundred 
Livers. More unto my brother Peter le Mercier in regard he is unaccom- 
modated I do give unto him for his daughters, if he have any, if not unto 
his sons, two thousand and five hundred Livers tournois and unto my said 
brother a Turky, which is a ring with a little blue stone, which I wear on 
my little finger. More unto my brother Francis le Mercier, who is not, 
married, I do give unto him one Gimboll ring of two rings and is round, I 
do wear it on my first finger, and eighteen hundred Livers Tournois. More 
unto my brother Daniel de Le Mercier, who is married, I do give him a 
Gimboll ring of three rin<:s, which is a ring which I wear on my finger 
next my little finger. I do also give him eighteen hundred Livers tournois, 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 987 

and because it is not long since he was married and that he cannot have 
many children and that I hope without doubt that he will endeavor to ad- 
vance himself by the vocation wherein it hath pleased God to set him, 
whom I do pray to bless him and us all, I do refer to the discretion of you 
my brethren, executors of this my Testament by the grace of God, to give 
him a part of this my gift or to put it forth at profit for his daughters in 
case he have any, if not, his sons, as you shall find good. More unto my 
sister -lane le Mercier. the wife of my brother Priaux, I do srive unto her 
my saphire, which is a ring which I wear on the finger next the little finger 
and is like a diamond. Also I do give uuto her for her daughters or sons 
I do likewise refer to your discretions in regard she hath many children, 
how be it, God be praised, she is in good estate, nevertheless I do give unto 
them eighteen hundred Livers for the advancement of her said children. 
More unto my sister Elizabeth Le Mercier who is a widow, and, God be 
praised, also in very good estate and hath not any great charge of children, 
I do give unto her my ruby, which is a ring which I wear on ruy^first 
finger, and uuto her daughters one thousand Livers tournois, or in default 
of her daughters unto her or her sons as you shall find good, for her eldest 
son, named John, is already well provided for of his father's goods and 
therefore it seemeth unto me to advance her son Paul in case his sisters do 
die, I do refer it to the two executors of my said Testameut. More unto 
my sister Judith le Mercier a little diamond which is on a ring which I 
wear on my first finger and unto her for her daughters, in case she have 
any, if not, to her sons eighteen hundred Livers tournois. More unto my 
sister Anne Le Mercier in regard I have brought her up with me I pray 
you my brethren and sisters take it not ill in case I do advantage and pre- 
fer her before you in regard of the good and faithful service which she hath 
done me, I being not able to do it when she was married in regard I was 
under the Law of my late husband having not since that time wanted affec- 
tion towards her but power, which I do desire to witness unto her in this 
my last will, I do give unto her for her daughters, or in default of daugh- 
ters unto her sons, the sum of three thousand Livers tournois and unto her 
my ewer of silver gilt and my little silver cup which my godfather gave me 
(and other articles). More unto her daughter Mary, my god daughter, 
five hundred Livers tournois and a little ring of gold which I do wear upon 
my little finger, which her mother gave me when she was married, being a 
love ring of gold, also my silver girdle with all those things which depend 
thereupon. And if her said daughter Mary do die and that she have not 
any other daughters my said girdle shall be given unto the eldest daughter 
of my sister Hester and my said sister Anu shall' inherit or have the five 
hundred Livers aud the said ring. More unto my sister Hester le Mercier 
my pointed diamond, which is a ring which I wear on the finger next my 
little finger, and eighteen hundred Livers Tournois for her daughters in 
case she have any, if not, to her sons. God bless you all aud me. More- 
over if it shall happen that any of my brethren or sisters do die without 
children I do desire that that which I have bequeathed uuto them shall re- 
turn amongst you my brethren and sisters to be equally divided amongst 
you unless any amongst you were unaccommodated and that those which 
are in good estate did assign or give them their part of their free will. 
And if the fathers and mothers of the children of my brethren and sisters 
here before mentioned be in good estate I desire that the interest of the 
money be added to the principal sum of the said children for the augment- 
ing of the said sum for the said children, but if their fathers or mothers be 






988 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

unaccommodated the said fathers or mothers shall enjoy the said interest 
for the bringing up of their said children in the fear of God, which God 
grant. I do will and understand that my said brethren and sisters here be- 
fore named shall be heirs of their children but I will not, if any of my said 
brethren do die without children, that the succession which they shall have 
had or enjoyed by me shall go to their wives or out of the " Linage " nor 
also if any of my sisters do die without children they may not give the said 
succession unto their husbands but I will that the same shall return amongst 
those which shall remain of you to be given to your children and that you 
share all equally together. Moveables to be sold to make up these suras 
if not ready money enough. And if it shall please the Lord so much to 
favour us as to give us peace and that I can be wholly out of the business 
and that I knew what were due unto me for some unclear parcels, as you 
shall perceive by an extract herein enclosed, I might (God willing) more 
amply and clearly declare my will. And when I shall have news that my 
moveables sent into your quarters are well arrived I may also (God willing) 
dispose of my said moveables, plate and apparrell belonging to my head, 
but until then I leave the same uudisposed, for the making up of the said 
sums &c. 

Now the reason that T do rather give unto my nieces than unto my 
nephews is that the fathers and mothers which do love their children ought 
to have a care to cause their sons to learn some honest vocation to the end, 
with the help of God, in time to attain unto that which shall be praise- 
worthy, for ordinarily daughters are not employed in such vocations, and 
specially those which are come of good families, unless necessity do there- 
unto urge them and therefore when they have some thing for their mar- 
riage they are sought after by honest men, howbeit I will not give this 
vanity unto myself that that little which I give them may greatly advance 
them but I prais God for his goodness which he hath done unto me and do 
pray him with all my heart to continue them unto me in his blessing and to 
his honor and glory the salvation of my poor soul and the edification of my 
neighbor, in all charity beseeching him also to give me grace to live and 
die in his fear and to grant me his heavenly kingdom at the end of my 
days and that my brethren and sisters, nephews and nieces and others my 
friends may after my death enjoy thereof in all prosperity and blessings of 
God to the grace and salvation of their souls. Amen. I do pray my 
brother Paul Le Mercier and my brother Francis Le Mercier to be execu- 
tors of this my Testament, for my brother Peter Le Mercier doth not dwell 
in those places but in Ireland, God give us all grace to do well, and if I do 
not die here the two hundred Livers which I do give unto the poor I do 
will that the same be given to the poor of the church of Hampton in Eng- 
land. 

Proved by the oaths of Paul and Francis Le Mercier, Letters of Admin- 
istration .vhich had been granted to the said Paul 22 September 1628 as if 
she had been intestate having been first brought in and renounced. 

St. John, 120. 

[Here we have the whole family of Mercers already referred to (Reg. Vol. 
47, pp. 511-514; ante, pp. 784-787) but bearing a French name. They may 
have migrated to Southampton either from France itself or from the Channel 
Islands, from which the allied family of Pryaulx seem to have come. We 
lind here Paul, Peter, Francis, Daniel* Jane (Pryaulx), Elizabeth (Blauchard), 
.Judith (Johnson), Anne (Strowde?) and Haster (Bachiler), only the testatrix, 
like a Frenchman, refers to his sisters by their maiden family names, not by 
those acquired through marriage. — II. F. Waters.] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 989 

Gideon Delawne of Loudon Esq., of the age of fourscore and nine 
years, or thereabouts, 19 June 1G54, proved 20 — 1G59. My body to be 
decently buried according to the wisdom of my executors in the rank of 
an Alderman of London in the Church porch of the Blackfriars, Lon- 
don, under the stone in that place where is written in great letters 
Sepulchrum Launeorum. to the better performance of which solemnity of 
my burial I do hereby order and appoint one thousand pounds to be 
expended therein. My manor of Roxton in the Co. of Bedford I give 
to my grandson William Delawne, son and heir of my deceased son 
Abraham Delawne &c, forever, as it is already settled on him upon his 
contract of marriage, upon condition that such manors, lands &c. in the 
said County as are settled and disposed of for the jointure of Mistress Ann 
Hugessen, the now wife of Master William Hugessen and formerly the wife 
of my said son Abraham, upon his contract of marriage with the said Anne 
by indenture tripartite dated G July 1G27, made between me, the said 
Gideon Delawne, and Judith my then wife, since deceased, of the first part, 
my said son Abraham Delawne and the said Ann Hugessen, by the name 
of Ann Sonds. one of the daughters of Sir Richard Sonds of ... in 
the Co. of Kent, sithence deceased, of the second part, and the said Sir 
Richard Sonds deceased and Sir George Sonds, sou and heir of the said 
Sir Richard Sonds, of the third part, shall be possessed and enjoyed by the 
said Ann Hugessen during her life for her jointure. I give the manor of 
Chersted in Kent to the use &c. of my said grandson William Delawne &c, 
remainder to George Delawne, second son of the said Abraham deceased, 
by the said Anne, then to Michael Delawne, third son &c, next to Gideon 
Delaune, fourth son &c. &c. I bequeath my mansion house, with shop, 
garden, round shop and round chamber towards the street, passages, stable, 
hayloft &c. in Blackfriars, to my daughter the Lady Ann Sprignell, the wife 
of Sir Richard Sprignell, baronet, upon condition that the said William De- 
laune shall have the four chambers next over the dining room in my said 
mansion house, for habitation &c, with free ingress &c. After the decease 
of the said Lady Ann Sprignell I give these premises to my said grandson 
William Delawne and his heirs forever. Other messuages &c. in Black- 
fryers (one occupied by brother Paul Delawne, Doctor in Physick) to my 
said grandson. I give him also my three shares of land in Virginia and 
my two shares of land in the " Barmoedas or Sommer Islands." I give to 
my grandchildren George, Michael and Gideon Delawne (sons of Abraham) 
five hundred pounds apiece, to be paid to each at his age of twenty and 
one years. To Anne Delawne, the second daughter of my said son Abra- 
ham, four hundred pounds and to Elizabeth Delawne, his youngest daughter, 
three hundred pounds, each at twenty one or day of marriage. To Richard, 
Gideon and William Sprignell, the sons of the said Sir Richard Sprignell 
and the said Lady Anne, three hundred pounds each at twenty one. To 
Susanna, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Hester and Judith, the daughters of the said 
Richard and Anne, three hundred pounds each at day of marriage or age of 
twenty one. To Abraham Chamberlaine, the son of my grandchild Mistress 
Chamberlaine, the eldest daughter of my deceased son Abraham and now 
the wife of Master Abraham Chamberlaine the younger, ten pounds to buy 
him a piece of plate whereon it is my desire my arms may be engraven. 
Certain silver vessels to grandson William Delawne. Two thousand pounds 
each to said grandson and to said daughter, the Lady Ann Sprignell. Fifty 
pounds to my brother Peter Delawne, M.D. To my nephew Henry De- 



990 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

lawne one hundred pounds, to his wife twenty pounds and to every one of 
his children ten pounds. Bequests to sister Vancourt and to her children 
Nathaniel Vancourt and Judith Vancourt. To my sister Chamberlaine 
forty shillings to buy her a ring. To sister Katherine Delawne, widow of 
brother Nathaniel Delawne, and her sons Nathaniel, John and Gideon. 
Master Jenkins, minister of St. Ann's Blackfryers and the two ministers of 
the French church. Sundry poor. The Company of the Apothecaries in 
Loudon. My cousin John Mary. Others mentioned. The executors to 
be Lady Ann Spriguell and grandson William Delawne. Pell, 380. 

Gideon Delawne of St. Anne Blackfryers. London, apothecary, 13 
November 1658, proved 10 January 1G58. To my loving wife Jane De- 
lawne the lease of the house wherein I now live, and all my household 
goods, money, plate &c, she to have the care and tuition of my daughter 
Anue; and I appoint my said wife sole executrix. Pell, 6. 

[Gideon Delaun, apothecary of London and Chersted, Kent, eldest son of 
William Delaune, a French Protestant pastor and doctor in phjsic. He was 
born in Itheims about 1565, came with his father to England, and vsas appointed 
apothecary to Anne of Denmark, queen of James I. In 1G10 he was granted the 
arms of the family of Launey of Belmesnil in Normandy, from which he was 
descended. 

He was a prominent member in the Apothecaries Company, and his fame was 
transmitted to succeeding ages as an originator of a long-famous pill. 

He married Judith, daughter of Henry Chamberleine ; his son married Anne, 
daughter of Sir Richard Sandys of Northbourue Court, Kent, Eng. 

TV. K. TV ATKINS.] 

Daniel Mercer of London, merchant, 22 November 1687, proved 
12 May 1692. Wife Rebecca. Marriage contract dated 26 May 1676. 
Sister Elizabeth Dodson. Sister in law Magdalen, the. relict of my de- 
ceased brother Benjamin Mercer. My sister Judith — . My cousins Peter 
Ducane, Christopher Lethieulier and Jacob Foitre. Son Thomas. Lands 
belonging to me in Ireland, for which my honored father, deceased, paid 
about four hundred pounds. The rest of my children. My house at Lime 
street, London, and my house at Peckham, Surrey. My five children 
Thomas, Daniel, Elizabeth, Anne and George Mercer. Brother George 
Dodson Esq. Friend Ralph Fordham. Fane, DO. 



John Priaulx of New Sarum, AVilts, gen'., 10 April 1695, proved 19 
April 1698. Houses and hinds in Pennington and Mil ford, Southampton, 
the town of Southampton, and the city of New Sarum. My three daughters, 
Katherine, Ann and Sarah Priaulx. My godson Edmond Naish, son of 
Edmond Naish. My wife. My sister M 1S . Katherine West. My kins- 
woman Mrs. Ann Priaulx. 

In a schedule or codicil, added 12 May 1697, others are named. Niece 
Katherine Aderly. Godson John Rowle- Sister Marchant. Sister 
Lamport. Sister Rowle. Aunt Priaulx. Cousin Ann Priaulx and her 
brothers, my cousins, John and Peter Priaulx. All my nephews and 
nieces. Daughter Katherine married to Edward Stephens, gen 4 . 

Lort. 106. 

[Other wills relating to this Mercer family of New Hampshire have been 
given in vol. 47 (pp. 510-15) (ante, pp. 783-788) and in vol. 48 (p. 274) (ante, 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 991 

p. 878). I take this occasion to correct a typographical error in the footnote 
on p. 274 (vol. 48) {ante, p. 878). For Mercor read .Mercer. The will of Mrs. 
Mary Cornell alias Le Mercier seems to me so very interesting and important 
that I have made a large abstract of it. It shows a probable French origin 
for this family. Henry F. Waters.] 

Martin Roberts of Truroe borough within the County of Cornwall, 
merchant, 1 March 1594, proved 5 March 1598. My mother Joan Roberts. 
My father in law John Catcher, alderman, and Ellen his wife. My 
brothers John and Richard Roberts, my sister Philip Robertes, my aunt 
Elizabeth Saundell, my brothers in law Jo :n Catcher, Edward Catcher, 
Ambrose Roiston and Thomas Modie, my nephews Richard Roberts, Josias 
Robertes and John Thomas, my cousins William, John and Simons Roberts, 
my brothers in law Martin Thomas, Roger Tucker, Balthazar Williams, 
John Michell and Henry Nanspian, my sister Anne Tucker and her 
daughter and every of my other sisters, viz. Jane, Elizabeth, Margaret and 
Christabell, and every of their children, as also Jane, my brother Richard's 
daughter, my sister Jane Catcher and my cousin Richard Jefferie and 
Grace Barges. Wife Ellen. Kidd. 22. 

Sententia pro confirmaQoe in the matter of the foregoing will was declared 
19 May 1599, the parties in the case being John Roberts a brother and 
Johaue Roberts the mother of the deceased, on the one part, and. on the 
other, Ellen Roberts the widow and executrix &c. Kidd, 43. 

John Robertes of the town and borough of Trewro, Cornwall, merchant, 
2G April 1603, with a nuncupative codicil, proved 8 February 1605. To 
my father Ronolde Robertes forty shillings a year for life. To Mary my wife 
twenty pounds a year for life and twenty pounds a year more so long as she 
doth continue widow and bear my name. My meaning is that she shall have 
but twenty pounds a year if she shall marry, otherwise forty pounds a year. 
Other bequests to her. To John Pendarves my brother in law one signet 
of gold to the value of forty shillings. To my brother William Robertes 
one signet of gold to the value of forty shillings. A similar bequest to 
brother Symon. To my sister in law Jane Robertes one gem of gold to 
the value of twenty shillings. To Mary Robertes my sister iu law one 
"em of gold to the value of thirteen shillings four pence. To John Pen- 
darves my godson one hundred pounds. To William the sou of Samuel 
Pendarves two hundred pounds (and certain leases). To Robert Peu- 
dervas one hundred pounds. To Grace Borges my sister forty shilliugs a 
year during her life. To John Roberte my nephew a heifer and a calf. 
To John Borges my godson a heifer and a calf by her side. To the rest 
of Grace Borges' children an ewe and lamb to each of them. To John 
Frye one ewe and lamb. Also I will have one gravestone '' to be settle " 
upon the place of my burial, at the charges of my executor. I give ten 
pounds to the end that it may be lent out at ten for a hundred and that the 
use may be given forever at Christmas and Easter to the poor. The rest 
of all my goods aud lauds and leases I give and bequeath unto Grace Pen- 
dervas my daughter and her I make my whole executor. 

Iu the codicil he enlarged his bequests to his wife Mary and sister Grace 
Burges, gave three of Samuel Pendarve's children three hundred pounds 
and made Samuel Pendarve and Grace his wife joint executors. 

Stafford, 16. 



992 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Thomas Burges the elder of Truro, Coruwall, merchant, 20 September 
1619, proved 12 December 1623. To be buried in the chancel of Truro 
church if I be within ten miles of the same at my death. To my wife 
Homier Burges her chest with all moneys and Jewells or things in the same 
as was hers at the time of my death, and two large silver bowls and one 
large gilt tankard which she herself brought in my life time. I give her also 
during her natural life, twenty pounds sterling per annum; and if she re- 
fuse the Duchy land that falleth to her by custom then I give her ten pounds 
per annum more. Other bequests to her. To my son Henry Burges, dur- 
ing his life, ten pounds per annum. If Jane Burges, now wife of my son 
Henry, shall survive her husband then I bequeath to her twenty pounds 
sterling. To my daughter in law Elizabeth Burges, mine executor's wife, 
for a remembrance of me two of my best and " valuablest" pieces of plate, 
to be chosen by herself. To my son Humfrey Burges fifty pounds. To 
my son Richard five pounds. To Thomas Burges, the son of my son 
Richard, twenty pounds at one and twenty. To my daughter Ann Trethe- 
wey fifty pounds. To John, Thomas, Richard, Barnard, Margery, Judith, 
Honnor and Joane Trethewey, sons and daughters of Robert Trethewey, ten 
pounds apiece at marriage or age of one and twenty. To my daughter 
Jane Poynter ten pounds. To all my godsons tweuty shillings apiece. To 
Josias Burges, at one and twenty, five pounds. To four of the poor of the 
town of Truro two pence apiece to begin the next Sabbath after my death and 
to continue forever. Six shillings eight pence for a sermon to be preached 
the next Sabbath after my burial and so yearly to continue forever; and for 
performance thereof mine executor shall tie the land, by order of law, unto 
the Town aud Borough of Truro for performance thereof. Mine executor 
shall give it himself and after his decease the Mayor of the said Borough. 
My brother in law M r . Anthony Pye, my son in law Mr. Robert Trethewey 
and my brother in law Mr. Peter Sidnam shall be the overseers of this my 
last will &c, to each of whom I give one gold ring worth thirty shillings 
apiece posy memento mori. The residue to my eldest son Thomas Burges 
whom I make and appoint sole executor &c. Swann, 127. 

[Thomas Burges, merchant, of Truro, married Honnor, daughter of Hum- 
phrey Sidman of Tregonie. 

At the Herald's Visitation of Truro, when the city arms were confirmed, i. e. 
October 9, 1G20, Thomas Burges was one of the four aldermen, his son, Thomas 
Jr., was one of the Burgesses, and Hugh Boscawen, mentioned, as will be seen, 
in George Phippen's will as a beneficiary and near kinsman to his wife, w r as 
Recorder of the city. The certificate of the arms aud seals was signed by 
the Mayor and Thomas Burges, and two others of the government. Fees, £3 
Gs. — George D. Phipfen of Salem, Mass.] 



Robert Trethwy, of the parish of St. Stephens in Brannell in the 
County of Cornwall, gen'., 26 November 1623, proved 27 April 1624. 
To the poor of the parish ten shillings. To the vicar for tithes forgotten 
ten shillings. To my wife Anne Trethwye my messuages &c. in Trevior 
aud Penbegle for the term of fifty years if the lives contained in the original 
lease live so long, with all such " fucum luce" * as now is in my inner par- 
lor in Treveor and the best bed whereon I use to lie performed with sheets 
and all other complements thereunto belonging and her own chest and ap- 

* I must look upon this strange phrase as a misreading for " furniture." 

Henry F. Watebs. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1)93 

navel 1. John Trethwye ray eldest son and heir shall have all my purchased 
land in all places within the County of Cornwall. To my daughter 
Margery two hundred pounds. To my daughter Judith two hundred 
pounds. To my sou Richard the right and term of years, after the decease 
of the said Anne my wife, at Treveor and Peubegle and twenty pounds in 
money. To my son Barnard Trethwy one hundred and fifty pounds. To 
Elizabeth Pye rav daughter ten pounds. To my daughter Ilonnor twenty 
pounds. To my daughter Joue ten pounds, with all such right as I have 
in Treneage &c. To my son Thomas the messuages in Eggto shellinges 
(sic), during the continuance of the lease, with the license of drawing and 
selling wine there. Sundry servants. The residue to my son John whom 
I make executor. And as overseers I do ordain and appoint Anthony Pye 
the elder of Bodinnicke Esq., Anthony Pie my son in law and Henry 
Pownd, to whom I do give for their care and pains therein twenty shillings 
to each of them. 

Sealed, signed and delivered to my son in law Anthony Pie the younger, 
gen'., in trust &c. Byrde, 06. 

[Robert Trethewey, will proved 1624, was son of Richard T. of St. Stephen. 
He married Anne, daughter of Thomas Burges of Truro, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Anthony Pye, Gent. 

Robert's children, a large family, are given in a note under his pedigree and 
arms in Visitation of Cornwall, 1620, pp. 237 and 8, and 306 arms. " Or. a chev. 
Sa. betw. 3 trefoils slipped Az." — G. D. P.] 

Thomas Burges of Truroe, Cornwall, merchant, 22 April 1626, with a 
Codicil of the same date, proved 20 June 1626. To the poor of Truro, 
Clemce (Clements) and Kenwin forty shillings. To my daughter Honor 
Burges three hundred pounds sterling, the one half to be paid her at the day 
of her marriage the other half within twelve months after, and in the mean 
time to be maintained by mine executor as shall be fit for her degree. To Anne 
Buries my daughter two hundred pounds (in similar payments). To my 
other two daughters Constance and Isabel Burges eight score pounds apiece 
(paid in similar way). To my son John two hundred and fifty pounds, to 
be paid at three years end after my decease, and my will is that he spend 
those three years abroad in the wars either in the low countries or elsewhere, 
during which three years my will is that mine executor allow him for his 
maintenance twenty marks sterling per annum, payable quarterly. To my 
son Henry my estate and interest in Kenwin Closes and the house, commonly 
called Thomas Glover's house, which I hold of the Borough of Truro. I 
give him also one hundred pounds to be paid him at eight years end &c. 
Provisions for binding him apprentice. To my other six sons, Caleb, Josua, 
Humphrie, James, Elisha and Thomas, to each of them two hundred marks 
sterling to be paid as they severally accomplish the age of one and twenty, 
and my will is that they be brought up in some honest calling and course 
of life. To my wife Elizabeth forty pounds sterling per annum during her 
life. Other bequests to her (including) one piece of plate called the " bar 
rell canne." The residue to my son Robert whom I constitute sole execu- 
tor. To my two brothers in law Anthony Pye of St. Stephens iu Brannell, 
gen 1 ., and George Phippen, rector of Truro, the mauor of Trethosa and 
the barton of Millador in trust to satisfy the legacies &c. 

George Phippen one of the witnesses. Hele, 91. 




994 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS EST ENGLAND. 

[Thomas Burges, son of the above, married Elizabeth Pye, 
March 27, loitS. Pedigree and arras of the Burges family is 
given in Visitation of Cornwall, 1G20, pp. 26 and 303. " Ckequy 
Gu. & Or, on a Chief Ar. 3 Cross Crosslets Az." (Same as in 
Phippen Genealogical Chart.)— See Heraldic Journal, vol. 4, 
frontispiece. 

The authors say in a note under the pedigree, p. 26, that 
Thomas Burges w'as Mem. Pari, from Truro, 1 & 21 of James 
1st, or in 1602 and 1G23. Perhaps this honor may have been 
shared by father and son, both of the same name. Other 
Burges impaling p^. notes on the same page jjives the baptism of his children, a 
large family, taken from the Truro Parish Records between 1509 and 1616. 

In his will he mentions his brothers-in-law, Anthony Pye and George Phippen, 
rector.— G. D. P.] 

John Trethewet of Truroe, Cornwall, gen'., 20 July 1626, with a 
codicil dated 7 August 1626, another 12 of August 1626, another 14 August 
1626, proved 15 January 1626. To the poor of Truro twenty shillings, to 
the poor of St. Stephen's twenty shillings, to the poor of Clemence ten 
shillings and to the poor of Kenwin ten shillings. To my mother Anue 
Trethewey ten pounds sterling. To my brothers and sisters, Elizabeth, 
Margery, Honor, Joane and Barnard, ten pounds sterling apiece (in six 
months after my decease). To my brother Richard thirty pounds sterling. 
To my godson Robert Pye forty shillings. To my goddaughter Joane 
Trethewey twenty shillings. To Joane Trethewey sometime a servant in 
my house twenty shillings. To every child of my brothers and sisters a 
noble apiece. To the boy Hugh Webbe which attendeth on me forty shil- 
lings to bind him apprentice to some honest trade, if it may conveniently 
be done, howsoever to be paid unto him or some friend of his for his good. 
For payment of debts and legacies and the discharge and payment of cer- 
tain debts and legacies of my father Robert Trethewey deceased, not yet 
satisfied, as they shall appear to be due I give and bequeath all the rest 
of my goods, chattells, lands, tenements &c. unto my brother Thomas 
Trethewey, merchant, whom, on this condition, I make and constitute my 
sole executor. If he refuse then I give unto my brother in law Anthony 
Pye of St. Stephens gen 1 , my house, also my laud called Riddle and my 
estate in Tregurgas &c, to raise money out of the same sufficient for the 
payment of the said debts and legacies. And that being done all the said 
houses and tenements to be and remain as the proper estate of the said 
Thomas Trethewey mine executor. 

Wit: Geo. Phippen, Honor Burges. 

In the first codicil he bequeaths to his uncle Richard Burges three 
pounds sterling, to his grandmother Honor Burges thirty shillings to buy 
her a ring, to his aunt Catherine Sidname five shillings and to his aunt 
Bennett two shillings six pence. In the third and last codicil he ratifies 
and allows of the last will and testament of his sister Judith Trethewey 
deceased. 

George Phippen was a witness to each codicil. Skynuer, 2. 

[John Trethewey (will proved 1626) was son of the above Robert, mentions 
the Burgesses and his brother-in-law, Anthony Pye, who married his sister 
Elizabeth; also his aunt Sidnam, which name appears in the Burges pedigree. 
George Phippen and Honor Bnrges were witnesses to his will. See Vis. Cor- 
wall, p. 26.— G. D. P.] 

William Catcher of Truroe, Cornwall, merchant, 13 December 1627, 
proved 26 March 1628. To my wife Margrett there will descend all my 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 095 

" Dutchie " land, whereby she will be provided for. I give and bequeath 
unto her all her wearing apparell and all her rings, Jewells and those trunks 
and chests which she now useth. I give her such household stuff, plate and 
necessary utensils as my brother in law George Phippen shall think fitting 
for her, also, for a testimony of my love, I give her that diamond ring which 
was my own and hath been long in her custody. As for my eldest son 
Edward Catcher, being but young and sickly, if he live unto it the said 
Duchy land will descend unto him, which will be a competent means for him. 
To John, my second son all my leases except that of my now dwelling house, 
which I ordain to be a dwelling house for my wife and all our children 
in common until God shall be pleased otherwise to dispose of them. To 
William, my youngest son, my right and interest in Newington house and 
lands, being copyhold lands, to hold according to the custom of the manor, 
from the time that he shall accomplish the age of twenty four years for- 
ward. Bequests of money &c. to '• my seaven " daughters, Constance, 
Matilda, Ellen, Margrett, Jane, Marie and Honor, at days of marriage or 
age of twenty four. My two youngest sons John and William to be joint 
executors. I appoint unto them and the rest, as overseer and guardian, 
my beloved brother in law George Phippen, ratifying and desiring to be 
ratified what he shall do, who I assure myself will do his best for this my 
family. 

Commission issued to the widow Margaret Catcher during the minorities 
of John and William Catcher &c. Barrinoton, 20. 

[William Catcher, merchant, who married Margaret Pye, daughter of Anthony 
Pye of St. Stephen's, was an alderman of Truro in 1G20. Will, proved 1G28, 
speaks of his property in Duchie land and other R. E. , and makes bequest to 
his seven daughters, the same whom George Phippen remembers in his will made 
thirty years afterward. He appoints his younger sons, John and William, to be 
executors; the mother, however, had charge while they were in their minority. 

George Phippen, his brother in law, to be overseer and guardian. 

It was this man's sou, John Catcher, who " pretended " against him, as Mr. 
Phippen says, gave him all his trouble, resulting in his imprisonment, loss of 
property and health. — G. D. P.] 

John Catcher (intending now a voyage for the Barbados) 23 June 
1630, proved 16 November 1631. To my cousin William Challouer a 
bond of two hundred pounds which my cousin John Smith of London, 
leatherseller, and Brian Coole of London standeth bound to pay unto me 
on Michaelmas Day 1634 (the sum of one hundred pounds), he giving 
bonds unto my cousin Smith to pay unto my father Thomas Catcher six 
pounds, thirteen shillings eight pence a year for life &c. Reference to 
debts and estates of late uncle Edward Catcher of Trinity Hall, Cam- 
bridge. To my loving cousin Edward Catcher, the son of my late uncle 
William Catcher late of Truro, Cornwall, twenty pounds; and if he die 
before my father then the said sum shall remain and be to his two brothers. 
Cousin Smith attorney to receive of my aunt Margaret Catcher, adminis- 
tratrix of my uncle William Catcher for the legacy which my aunt Ursula 
Catcher gave me by her last will and testament &c. and to receive of 
my cousin Richard Mowsdale ten pounds, being part of a legacy of thirty 
pounds given unto me by my late uncle William Brooke Esq. late of London, 
skinner. St. John. 120. 

[John Catcher, bound for Barbadoes in ItioO, was the son of Thomas, a 
brother of William.— G. D. P.] 



996 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

George Fitzpen ah Phippen, 20 July 1050, pioved at London 1 
March 1651 by Mary Phippen, relict and executrix. 

Whereas John Catcher pretending against me an Oxford decree (void 
in itself), during the time of my imprisonment, for mine adhering to the 
Parliament, plundered me iu corn and goods of all kinds, according to a 
schedule hereunto annexed, of the value of two hundred and ten pounds 
and seven shillings, for recovery whereof against him and other his agents 
I leave it to mine executrix hereafter named. Item to his sisters which had 
no portions, viz*: M 1 ' William White, for his deceased wife Constance, to 
Margaret, Ellianor. Jane, Mary and Honour, I give and bequeath freely 
all those my lands in Perausand (by me dearly paid for) which were their 
father's; and all this I do for them (God be my witness) not out of 
any check of conscience that I ever wronged that family, for I did supply 
and support them for many years with mine own estate; so as they have 
spoken against me without a cause for my love they are my adversaries, 
but I give myself unto prayer the good God give them repeutance and for- 
give them. Reference made to fifty pounds lent unto M rs Margaret Catcher, 
widow. Item 1 forgive unto Henry Pye of Stephent, gentleman, all the 
money which he oweth unto me (about one hundred pounds). I forgive unto 
M r . Henry Edmonds and Thomas Drake all the cost in law for a suit begun 
in the consistory of Exon and finished with sentence for me in the Arches. 
I formve unto the executor or administrator of one Hercules Ash the 
money which he owed me. To M rs . Mary Woolcott (sheep) — to certain 
servants &c. To Joane Phippen widow (sheep). To Ellinor Phippen, 
now Ellinor George, and Francis George her husband. To my honored 
friend Hugh Boscawen Esq. I give my cabinet press, and unto his honor- 
able lady my clock, and I humbly pray his assistance unto my wife, his 
near kinswoman and to my heirs. To Anne Grosse the daughter of my 
brother in law Edward Gross of Trurow land in Kenwyne street, Somer- 
set, in the tenure of John Rankin and John Daniell. To my kinsman 
and brother's son, Roger Phippen of Penny com quicke I give that silver 
bowle which was M 1 ' Upcott's if it be not redeemed with fifty shillings 
before my death, and I give unto him my land in Enoder &c, now in the 
tenure of Mary Thomas. 

Item — for my brother David Phippen in New England I do give and 
bequeath unto his eldest son the lesser Trewoone, unto his second sou that 
Trevossa whereon Nicholas Clemowe liveth, unto his third son the other 
Trevossa called Petherickes because it was sometimes in the tenure of one 
William Petherieke &c. ; and if either of these three brothers die without 
issue my will is that that tenement shall descend unto the fourth son, and 
so on ; and to his daughter or daughters twenty pounds. Also to the eldest of 
these brothers I give my signet ring and to the second the silver seal which 
hangeth at my purse. To my sister Cicely Reignolds my two biggest silver 
spoons, my ring with Death's head unto her husband. To Edmond Braine 
ten pounds and to each of his brothers six pence and to his sister six pence. 
To my kinsman Thomas Phippen of Clemence all my right in a field in 
Kenwyne which I hold of M r Pearce Edgcombe and which William Priske 
holdeth of me from year to year (and other property)- 

Item, my prayer is that God would provide some able and faithful min- 
ister to succeed me in Lemoran. Certain legacies to wife Mary and she to 
be executrix. I desireHugh Boscawen Esq. aforenamed, John Penros Esq. 
and Edward Grosse gentleman to be overseers, and to each forty shillings. 
Reference to jointure promised to wife in marriage (thirty pounds per year). 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



997 



Truly her virtuous and respectful deportment towards me deserves well at 
my hands. To the poor of Weymouth in Dorset five pounds, of Melcombe 
there ten pounds, of Comborne three pounds, of Enoder forty shillings. 
I pray my brother John Penros to distribute of my moneys twenty pounds 
in. >re unto the poor of twenty parishes, when he shall think fit, twenty 
shillings to each. I give to every of his children twenty shillings apiece. 
Wit: Hugh Boscawen, John Penros. Thomas Harney. Bowyer. 57. 

[Rev. George Fitzpex als Phippen, Rector of St. Mary's Church at Truro, 
will proved in 1651, was the son of Robert Fitzpen of Weymouth in Dorset- 
shire, who married Cecelie, daughter of Thomas Jordan, 18 September 1580, 
and great grandson of Henry Fitzpen and Alice Pierce of St. Mary Overy in 
Devonshire. His brothers were Owen and David. Owen was born at Mel- 
comb in 15S2 j married Annie Coinie 3 July 1G03. (Weymouth and Melcomb, 
united by a bridge, were under one government or mayoralty). 

Owen Phippen was a great traveller; he was taken by the Turks in 1620, and 
after seven years bondage, he, with ten other Christian captives under his lead- 
ership, overcame sixty-five Turks in their own ship, which he took to Cartagene, 
sold all for .£0000, returned to England and died at Lamorran, 17 March 1636. 

A tablet was erected to his memory in St. Mary's Church at Truro. See 
Ilutehins's History Cornwall, Vol 2 ; 648. 

David Phippen, from whom the writer of these notes is descended, came to 
New England and was one of thirty persons who began the settlement of Hing- 
ham, September 18, 1633, where sundry lots of land were granted him. He 
removed to Boston in 1641, and died there about 1650. His son, Joseph Phip- 
pen, removed from Boston to Falmouth, Casco Bay (Portland) about 1650, 
thence to Salem in 1665. Joseph's son David, having large landed possessions 
at Casco Bay, remained there till slain (1703) in the Indian and French war. 

George Phippen, A.M., while master of the grammar school in Truro, one of 
the first seminaries of England, furnished and certified to the arms and pedigree 
of his family at the Herald's Visitation of Cornwall in 1620, as given below. 
See Drake and Vivian's Visitation of Co. Cornwall in 1620, published in London 
in 1847, p. 71. Arms, " Argent two bars in chief 3 escallops, sable." 




FITZPEN al's PHIPPEN. 
Arms. — Arg. two bars, in chief three escallops, Sa. 

Hen. Fitzpen = Alice Da. of 



of St. Mary Ov'y 
in Devon. 



Jo. Fitzpen = 



Peirce of Ireland. 



Da. of 



llobt. Fitzpen als. Fippeu = Cicilie Da. of 



of Wamouth in 
Com. Dorset. 



Tho. Jordon of 
Dorsetsh. 



George 3 sone 
of Trewro in 

Cornwall 
liveing 1620. 



I 
David 

2 sone. 



Owen Fitzpen 

of Ireland 

1 sonue. 



I 
Cicilie 

a da. 






998 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



Ill 

SI - 


£99 







The Rev. George Phippen was persecuted for his Puritanic tendencies and his 
adherance to Parliament, being driven from his charge of 2G years duration over 
St. Mary's Church at Truro, and that of Lamorrau, a village a few miles dis- 
tant. How long he was imprisoned we know not. In ] is will he complaius 
bitterly, though forgivingly, of his persecutor, who wa s of his own connec- 
tions, as may be seen in the record of the family of Anthony Pi<^ of St. Stephen, 
who married Constance Pound. This family was of good soc al position, and 
was probably divided by the bitter party feeling of those roublous times. 
"Arms, Ar. on a fess Az. 3 escallops of the first," — same as on Phippen 
Genealogical Chart. 

William Catcher married Margaret Pie ; these were the parents of John Catcher 
who " pretended" against Mr. Phippen, notwithstanding he had been guardian 
over liis youth. 
Henry Burgess married Jane Pye. 
Thomas Burgess married Elizabeth Pye. 

A son, Anthony Pye, married Elizabeth, daughter of Robt. Trethewey. 
George Phippen married 1st, Joan Pie; 2d, Mrs. Mary Penros, June 20, 1648, 
who survived him. 

Gilbert's His. Cornwall says, that the P} T es with the Spreys 
during the interregnum of Cromwell turned decimators and 
sequestrators upon the lands and revenues of the royal laity 
and clergy of Cornwall to that degree of hurt and damage 
that occasioned the making of that short litany, "From the 
Pyes and Spreys, Good Lord deliver us." 

Joseph Phippen above mentioned, with a forethought not 
common with pioneers, prepared a Genealogical Chart of his 
own and collateral families left in the old country, embla- 
zoned with coat-armor, etc., to which were added later 
puppen imping Pye. generations of the new. 

This chart suffered the loss of some of its tablets during the disturbances of 
the Revolution ; the remnants of Avhich were published in the 4th volume of the 
Heraldic Journal. 

The wills under consideration, obtained through the researches of Mr. H. F. 
Waters, have dropped the enquirer as it were, into the midst of these very 
families, and at times not remote from the period when the English part of that 
chart was prepared. Possibly the compiler was assisted in that portion of the 
collection by his uncle, George Phippen of Truro. Suffice it to say that so much 
has already been brought to light and corroborated regarding these English 
families, that we now place entire confidence in the ancient record, coat-armor 
and all. — George D. Phippen.] 

Anne Roberts of Woolwich Kent, widow, 4 January 1872. My debts 
and funeral charges discharged I give everything to my loving son in law 
David Phippen, full and sole executor &c. 

Commission issued 20 January 1672 to Anne Phippen wife of David 
Phippen now in the ship called the Revenge, sole executor &<\, to admin- 
ister according to the tenor and effect of the will during the absence and 
for the benefit of the said David Phippen. Pye> H- 

Mense Junii Anno 1673 
Vicesimo primo die emt. com Ax.vae Phippenny relict. Davidis Phip- 
penny imp de Nave Le Revenge in servicio dni uri Regis def. hentis &c. 

Admon. A.B. 1673, fo. 79. 

[This David may have been a descendant of Owen Phippen. There were 
several others of the family name, mentioned in the will of George Fitspeu, 
probably his cousins and sons of his uncles John and George, for the old chart 
say> that ••John Fitspen left issue Robert, John and George," though the two 
latter are not mentioned in the visitation pedigree. George's sister Cecilia, there 

mentioned, was hap. at Melcomb March 10, 1593, and md Reynolds. — 

G. 1). 1'. 

Note. — The illustration on page '.''.'4 for the arms of Burges of Cornwall, 
loaned by Mr. Phippen, is correctly drawn. — Committee on Heraldry of 
the X. E. Historic Genealogical Society.] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. H99 

Jam. Stolion of London, widow. 9 April 1640, proved 4 May IG47. 
T have settled my lands in Mayfield, Sussex, upon William Hayes of Little 
Horsted, Sussex, gen 1 , and John Maynard of Mayfield, clerk, and Nicholas 
Durant of Headlith (sic) and Thomas Turnor of Caginer (sic) in the same 
County, yeoman, and their heirs upon certain trusts, to dispose of the pro- 
fits as by me directed. My daughter Elizabeth Stolion shall have, for life, 
out of the. Lodge fields four pounds a year after the death of me and of my 
sou Abraham. And all my said lands and the residue of the profits, after 
my death, shall be to the use of my son Abraham and the heirs of his body 
&c, remainder to my son Thomas Stalion and the heirs of his body &c, 
and, for default of such issue, to the son and heir of John Edwards late of 
Cockfield, Sussex, gen 1 , and the heirs of his body &c, and for default of 
such issue to my sou Thomas Stolion and his heirs for ever. I make my 
son Abraham Stolyou executor and do give him all my personal estate 
which I have in New England. And I do further give &c. uuto my son 
Thomas Stolyou all my personal estate which I have in Old England. If 
my said son Thomas shall give and secure unto my said daughter Elizabeth 
ei°dit pounds a year (during her life) for her maintenance and support then 
and from thenceforth he shall be freed and discharged of and from all debts 
and demauds which I, my executors &c, may or can claim from him. 

Witnesses John White, John Phelpes and James Morgan. 

Proved, at London, by Abraham Stolyon, son and executor. 

Fines, 112. 

Thomas Stolyon of Warbleton, Sussex, gen 4 , 10 October 1679. To 
loving wife Susan and to Elizabeth the wife of Samuel Spatchurst of War- 
bleton aforesaid all my utensills and household stuff, to be equally divided 
between them by Richard Weller B.D., rector of Warbleton, and Edward 
Hawkesworth Esq. of the same parish. To my said wife Susan ten pounds 
yearly for life out of the rents and profits of all my lands in Mayfield, War- 
bleton and Heathfield, in the said County, she to relinquish and release all 
her right, title and dowery and claim to the thirds of my lands. I do de- 
vise and settle all my said lands upon Edward Polhill of Burwash in the 
said County Esq. and Richard Weller and Edward Hawkesworth &c. as 
ffeoffes in trust, for uses hereafter expressed, and if occasion be (for speedy 
payment of debts) to sell my house in Mayfield town, now in the occupa- 
tion of Samuel Paris and others, and more of my lands. After all debts 
paid then the said Trustees, their heirs and successors shall forever out in 
two or three years put out two poor boys or girls, inhabitants of Warbleton, 
apprentice to some good trades and at the end of their apprenticeship allow 
them a convenient stock for setting up and improving their trades; and also 
once in two or three years to portion out poor maids, inhabitants of War- 
bleton, in marriage. The said Richard Weller and Edward Hawkesworth, 
whom I appoint executors, to recover and sue for all my just debts which 
are recoverable either in law or equity from the ffeoffees of Henry Smith 
Esq. deceased upon the account of any damage by me sustained &c. and 
also what is due from any other person or persons either in old England or 
in New England. All such debts &c recovered to go towards the payment 
of my debts &c. 

Commission issued 26 November 1680 to Samuel Spatchurst, gen 1 , John 
Wood Sen 1 and Samuel Store to administer according to the tenor of the 
will for the use and benefit of the people of Warbleton, for the reason that 
the executors named in the will renounced &c. Bath, 73. 



1000 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Sentence for the confirmation of the foregoing will was declared 23 No- 
vember 1680, the parties in the case being Spatchurst, Wood and Store, 
Trustees for the people of Warbletou, on the one side, and Elizabeth Come, 
natural and lawful sister of the deceased, on the other. Bath, 183. 

[Our eastern friends will recognize the above name which has sometimes 
taken other forms, as Stallian, Stanyan, &c, &c. — H. F. Waters.] 

Susan Hamore, widow, executrix of the last will and testament of 
Raphe Hamore my late husband &c, 18 February 1G16, proved 19 
February 1616. To my brother Jonas Owen one hundred pounds. To 
my sister Sara Snelliug the wife of Francis Snelling twenty pounds. To 
Lyonell Barron and Susan Barron, the son and daughter of Christopher 
Barron and my daughter, one hundred pound the piece. Whereas my 
deceased husband gave to Birsaba Snelling, daughter of Francis Snelling, 
three hundred pounds to be paid her at her marriage my will is that imme- 
diately after my decease the said Birsaba shall have the use and benefit of the 
said sum for her maintenance and finding, and for the money to be paid and 
disposed according to the will of my husband. The poor of St. Buttolph's 
Aldgate where my desire is my corpse should be laid near the bodies of 
my father and mother. The five children of my brother Jonas Owen (at 
twenty one or marriage). I give to Thomas Hamore, Raphe Hamore and 
Jane Blackall, the sons and daughter of my late husband, ten pounds the 
piece. The residue to my daughter Sara Baron, the wife of Christopher 
Baron, whom I make my sole executrix ; and I nominate overseers hereof 
Mr. Richard Stocke preacher and Thomas Edney citizen and skinner of 
London, to either of whom I give five pounds the piece. Weldon, 10. 

William Pemberton of Rendlesham, Suffolk, Bachelor of Divinity, 22 
October 1598, proved 4 May 1599. To wife Elizabeth a!l my lands and 
tenements &c. in Suffolk during life and widowhood, she paying to my son 
Richard yearly, till he be one and twenty years old, twenty marks and after 
his said full age twenty pounds towards his maintenance at school and learn- 
ing. After decease of my said wife I give these lands &c. to my said son 
Richard. I give to Richard all my books, notes and writings. If wife die 
before Richard is of full age then I give out of said lands &c. one hundred 
marks to be paid by him, that is, twenty marks yearly for five years to my 
son Mathie, beginning two years after her decease. And for default of 
such payment, upon lawful demand &c, I give to said Mathie all my lands, 
free and bond, lying in Tunstall. If wife take another husband son Richard 
shall, upon her marriage, enter my lands presently, and then I give her, in 
lieu of her thirds, an annuity of twenty pounds. 

I give to my sons Joseph, Benjamin and Paul, at their several ages of 
one and twenty years, one hundred marks each; and to my two daughters 
Scholastice and Aune one hundred marks each, to be paid at their like ages 
or davs of marriage. Wife Elizabeth and son Richard to be executors. 

Kidd, 42. 

Paul Pembkrton citizen and haberdasher of London, 23 July 1625, 
proved 27 September 1 625. The poor of Stebbing. The poor of St. 
Michael's Crooked Lane. The poor of Mr. Stock's church in Bred Street. 
Ten pounds to he equally divided unto those men unto whom my brother 
Benjamin was indebted, according unto their several debts. Ten pounds 
towards the building up of Mi- Stock's church, it being now pulled down. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. ll)()l 

Twenty pouuds to ray brother Mr Carter. Twenty pounds to my brother 
Joseph Pemberton. My brother Mathias Pemberton and his daughter 

Elizabeth and his other two children. My brother Benjamin's two 
children Elizabeth and Joseph. I leave twenty pounds in my execu- 
tor's hands for to pay twenty shillings yearly for twenty years to come 
upon the fifth day of November for a sermon to be preached in the after- 
noon by the parson of St. Michael Church in Crooked Lane in London in 
a remembrance of God's great mercy unto our nation as on that day in de- 
livering us from so great a "daunger " as on that day we were subject uuto. 
Five pounds more to pay five shillings yearly for twenty years to come, to be 
given in bread to the poor of St. Michael &c. upon the fifth of November 
as aforesaid, at night after the sermon is ended. Twelve pounds to twelve 
poor ministers, to be given by my brother Joseph and my brother Mathias 
as they shall see where is most need. My mother Mary Whiskett of Nor- 
wich widow. Cox Tooke ironmonger, his wife and children. To Ellen 
Tucker, widow, a bond of twenty pounds that Mr Allen of Ipswich standeth 
bound for, the truth is it is her money and not mine. To my brother Mr 
John Fuller forty shillings to make a couple of rings, one for himself and 
another for his wife, to wear them for my sake. Elizabeth Pemberton the 
daughter of Mathias. To brother Joseph half my books and the other half 
I will Mathias may have. Item, I give my twenty pounds adventured into 
New England unto the Company to be employed by them towards the 
foundation of a church if ever God give them a settled peace there. The 
residue to brother Joseph whom with my brother Mathias I make my 
executors &c. Clarke, 100. 

Dame Anne Modlson (Register, vol. 48, page 405, ante, p. 913). 

The Moulson Coat of Arms. 

In addition to what has already been gleaned in England regarding Sir Thomas 
Moulson and his wife Dame Anne (Radcliffe) Moulson, Dr. Marshall, Rouge 
Croix Pursuivant, kindly contributes the following : 

" ' The arms and crest of Mr. John Moulson of Hargrave Stubs, in the Co. of 
Chester, and of Mr. Thomas Moulson of London his brother, being truly descended 
from the co-heirs of Rosengrave, Oreby and Hargrave — exemplified by Win. 
Camden, Clarenceux King of Arms.' The arms are taken from the original, 
which was then in custody of Mr. Thomas Moulson, nephew and heir of Sir 
Thomas Moulson, Knight, Alderman of London, and are quarterly : 

1. Gules a chevron argent frette sable between three mullets or (for Moulson). 

2. Or a fess wavy and in chief three martlets sable (for Rosengrave). 

3. Gules two lions passant argent, in chief a label or (for Oreby). 

4. Argent a griffin segreant per fess gules and azure (for Hargrave). 

Crest — A griffin passant per pale gules and azure, resting the dexter fore-claw 
or a mullet or." 

Dr. Marshall adds : " Argent two bends engrailed sable are the arms of the 
Radclitfes of Ordsall, from which family Anthony (father of Anne) Radcliffe 
descended." Henry E. Woods. 

John Woodbury of Beverley in New England, mariner, but now resident 
on board his Majesty's ship the Crown, 4 August 1G72. I give to my well 
beloved friend Mr Daniel Berry of Limehouse, Stepney, all my moneys or 
wages as shall be due for my service or wages in the ship Crown, but to the 
intent and purpose to pay and satisfy all such just and due debts as are 
owing unto him the said Mr Berry ami to any other person to whom I shall 
justly stand indebted unto; and, for the remainder of the moneys it is my 
will that my wife shall have and enjoy and to be sent her by the first op- 



1002 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

portunity into New England, which I desire Mr Berry to procure safe con- 
veyance of the same. I give and bequeath unto my said wife Elizabeth 
Woodbury all my books and sea instruments which I have now in my chest 
and also a new cloth coat, which, my will is, may be also sent to my wife with 
the first and safest conveyance; or that, if the said Mr Berry shall think 
convenient, to sell or dispose to sale all or any part of books, instruments 
or coat and to make return of the product of them unto my wife in money 
or goods. To my friend John Tayler mariner, one of the said ship's com- 
pany, all my wearing apparell &c. 

Commission issued to Daniel Berry 18 January 1672 to administer &c. 
no executor having been named. Bye, 13. 

William Traheune of St. Clement Danes, Middlesex, chandler, 29 
April 1658, proved 24 June 1658. Wife Dorothy. To my grandchild 
William Haisman fifty pounds (he under 16 years of age). The next child 
of my daughter Ellenor Haisman. To my brother Richard Trahorne now 
in Virginia ten shillings. The residue to Henry Haisman and Ellinor his 
now wife whom I make executors. 

Broved by Henry Haisman, power reserved to Elianor Haisman. 

Wootton, 296. 

Elizabeth Slaughter, 5 August, 1645. Am now fallen into a time 
of great " mortallitie." I now in perfect health. I do appoint that my 
true natural son William Clarke, son to my first husband Henry Clarke, 
shall have and enjoy all that I have if he be living and shall come to de- 
mand it within the term of seven years after my decease, excepting some 
certain things hereafter specified, which are these. I do give to my sister 
Francis, wife to William Gilbert, one pair of fince (sic) laced pillowbeers. 
To my cousin Elizabeth Elliott one flaxen table cloth. To my cousin Mary 
King one little cabinet. The rest of my household stuff equally to my 
cousins Mary and Rachel Cullom, daughters to my sister Jane Cullom, 
except one feather bed and boulster which I appoint for my son William if 
he come to demand it as aforesaid. If I die before the return of Isaac 
Walker from New England I give to my cousin Mary Cullome, before- 
named, full power to recover and receive fifty shillings due to me from the 
said Isaac Waker (sic) for her own use, whether my son come or not; but 
in case she die before she be married I then appoint the said fifty shillings 
for her brother Robert Collom. 

Now if my son William Clarke come not after my decease within the 
time limited or if otherwise by good and sufficient testimony it may be 
proved that he be dead then I appoint such moneys or goods that by virtue 
hereof appertaineth to him, the third part I give to the said Mary Cullome, 
the rest to be equally divided between my sister Sibbill Howell's children 
and my sister Francis children and my sister Jane Cullotn's children. To 
the poor of the parish where I shall be buried five shillings. And that this 
my said will may be faithfully fulfilled I do desire to entrust herein my 
brother Arthur King, my brother Joshua Slaughter and my brother Robert 
Cullom, to whom I give at my decease five shillings apiece. Witnessed by 
John Saniford and Mary Hart. 

Commission issued 20 June 1646 to Robert Culme, one of the trustees, 
to administer according to the tenor of the will. Twisse, 83. 

In the probate Act Book for 1646 the diocese of Bristol is indicated, but 
no parish. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1003 

Matthias Nicholls, preacher of God's word to the town of Plymouth, 
Devon (without date) proved 10 October 1G31. To the Governors of the 
New Hospital, called the poor's portion, ten pounds. To the Governors of 
the Hospital adjoining, called orphans' aid, live pounds. I give three 
pounds to be distributed among the poor of Plymouth. To the poor of 
the town of Buckingham forty shillings. Likewise I give unto the Com- 
mon Stock for New England, towards the advancement of that plantation, 
the sum of thirteen pounds. My land in Plymton Mary parish I give to 
my beloved wife, during her natural life, and after her decease to my son &c, 
remainder to son Matthias &c., next to son Samuel &c, then to daughters 
Johan and Hanna and their heirs forever. To daughter Johan fifty pounds, 
to be put into the hands of some trusty friend to be employed for her ad- 
vantage (and the remainder of certain lease) she to receive her stock at the 
age of twenty and one years or day of marriage. A similar bequest to 
daughter Hanna. To my two younger sons Mathias and Samuel one hun- 
dred marks apiece, at one and twenty. The residue of my goods &c. to my 
wife whom I make and constitute sole executrix. Reference to the lease of 
the new market house of the town, intrusted to beloved friends Mr. Robert 
Trelawny, Mr. Edmond Fowell and Mr. Richard Tapper, and " the two 
leases bought for mee by M r Jope of M ns Parker and her sonne." My 
desire is that my wife will reserve such of my books as shall be thought 
useful for my son John until he be fit to make use of them. And herein 
my desire is that she use the advice of my dear friend Mr. John Vincent 
who will, I doubt not, ease her of a great part of her care in his education. 
As for my papers and notes I commit them wholly to the disposing of the said 
M r . Vincent, my dear brother Mr. Ferdiuando Nicolls and my beloved cousiu 
Mr. Abraham Sherwill, desiring them to set apart such as they shall think 
useful either for the public good of the Church or for the furthering of my 
son John in his particular studies and to burn the rest &c. My cousin 
Abraham Sherwill to choose out of my best English books for his father, 
mother, wife, her brother and sister, each of them one such as he shall 
think most convenient for them as tokens of my love. 

Proved by Martha Nicholls, widow &c. St. John, 107. 

William Pittes, of the parish of Temple within the city of Bristol, 
clothier, 30 October 1592, proved 3 January 1592. My body to be buried 
in the church of Temple. The poor of the said parish. To William my 
eldest sou my house wherein I now dwell, with all the furniture thereunto 
belonging; that is to say, one standing bed, with a truckle bed uuder it, with 
a feather bed in the one and a flock bed in the other, two pair of sheets 
and a pair of blankets and the best coverlet which I bought of Lynzey the 
wait player. But Annes my wife shall have and hold the said house and 
furniture till William my son come to the age of twenty and one years. 
And after that, if the said Agnes remain a widow, she shall pay twenty 
shillings yearly for rent &c. To the said William the lease of the house 
wherein my mother now inhabiteth, the same to hold immediately after the 
decease of my said mother. Other legacies to the said AVilliam. Remainder 
to his brethren in order of age (Robert, Thomas and John). Special be- 
quests to them and to daughter Elizabeth, at one and twenty. My brother 
Richard Pitte's two daughters. Sir Richard Martyn of Temple. Wife 
Agnes to be executrix and Mr. John Pickes and Thomas Heywarde to be 
overseers. Newell, 1. 



1004 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Robert Owen of the city of Bristol, merchant, now bound on a voyage 
into the parts beyond the seas, 5 September 1614, with a codicil dated 4 
September 1615, proved 16 February 1615. To wife Mary four hundred 
pounds and the messuage wherein I now dwell situate upon the " Kaye" 
within the said city, to hold for life ; and after her decease I give the said 
messuage to my son Robert Owen. I give my said son all my lands, mes- 
suages &c. in Bristol and in Portbury, Somerset, or elsewhere, and also two 
hundred pounds. To my daughter Mary Owen three hundred pounds. 
The same to daughter Johane Owen and the child wherewith my wife now 
goeth, yet unborn. A great part of my estate is in Adventure at sea, part 
insured by Policy of Assurance recorded in the Royal Exchange in Lon- 
don and part upon mine own adventure not insured. Wife Mary to have 
the use and keeping of my children's legacies until they shall accomplish 
their several ages of one and twenty or be married, she putting in sureties 
to be bound in double the sum to pay the said legacies together with the 
benefit and use for the same at the rate of nine per cent for one whole year 
until such time as they shall be paid. My brother GrifFeth Owen. My 
sister Mary Owen. My brother George Owen. My sister Ellinor Owen. 
My brother Griffeth Owen to pay his brother and sisters at the town of 
Carmarthen. Wife Mary and sou Robert to be executors and loving cousin 
Rice Davies Esquire and loving brother in law William Pitt, merchant, and 
good friend William Baldwyn, brewer, to be overseers. In the codicil he 
increases the legacies to his daughters Mary and Johane by two hundred 
pounds apiece more. 

Probate was granted to the widow as above but was not granted to the 
son, Robert Owen, until 24 April 1627. Cope, 8. 

William Pitt of the city and Diocese of Bristol, sheereman or cloth- 
worker, 11 January 1603, proved 21 April 1604. To be buried in the 
church and churchyard of Temple in the said city. To my son Francis 
Pyttes the messuage &c. wherein I dwell, with remainder to my brother 
Robert Pittes and next to my right heirs &c. To my said brother Robert 
the house, rack and garden now in the tenure of Richard Baker weaver, 
after the decease of my grandmother Johau Pittes. To my godson William 
Hall the lease of the house wherein his father doth dwell, and if he die 
before he come to the age of one and twenty then the same lease shall 
remain to Samuel Wilson the son of my sister Wilson. To my said sister 
Wilson six pounds out of that debt which my brother in law Lawrence 
Wilson owes me, as by a judgment had in the court of Common Pleas 
more at large appeareth. To Anne Weale my wife's sister's daughter five 
pounds. To my cousin Sara Pope three pounds at her day of marriage or 
age of one and twenty years. Certain debts of Richard Baker, William 
Deane and Richard Gouldsmith forgiven. The remainder to my son 
Francis Pittes whom I ordain and make my sole and whole executor, pro- 
vided that if it shall please Almighty God to call out of this mortal life my 
said son Francis before he shall accomplish the full age of one and twenty 
years or be married then my will and meaning is that my cousin John Pittes 
shall have twenty pounds in money out of the legacies bequeathed to my 
said son ; and then also I do ordain and make my said brother Robert Pittes 
to be the executor &c. And I do appoint my loving friends Francis Bayllye 
and Richard Simondes to be my overseers &c. desiring them, as my trust in 
them is, to see this my will truly and justly to be performed, as much as in 
them lieth, and to see my said sou to be brought up in the fear of God. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1005 

They to have for their pains twenty shillings apiece. And I appoint the 
said Richard Goldsmith to have the keeping and education of my said son 
Francis as long as my said overseers shall think it fitt and convenient. 

Commissiouat the above date to Francis Bayllye and Richard Symondes, 
the supervisors named in the will, to administer the goods &c. according to 
the tenor of the will during the minority of Robert Pittes (sic) brother &c. 
and executor &c. Harte, 43. 

William Pitt of the city of Bristol merchant, 13 May 1622, proved 
4 February 1G24. To my loving wife Mary five hundred pounds. To my 
son William two hundred and fifty pounds. To my son Robert three score 
and ten pounds. To my son Henry two hundred and fifty pounds. To my 
son Thomas two hundred and fifty pounds. To my daughter Mary Pitt two 
hundred and fifty pounds. To my daughter Anne Pitt two hundred and 
fifty pounds. To my daughter Maude Pitt two hundred and fifty pounds. 
To mv daughter Martha Pitt two hundred and fifty pounds. To my wife Mary 
a lease of the house wherein I now dwell, in Redclife Street, and also of the 
house in the same street wherein Samuel Griffeth the glasier dwelleth and my 
garden in St. Thomas Lane, for life, paying unto my sou William four pounds 
yearly for the same during her life. After her deeease I give the said two 
houses and garden to my son William &c, with remainder to son Henry, 
then to son Thomas, next to my son Robert and lastly to my heirs general. 
To my son Robert the tenement without Temple gate called the Saracen's End 
(sic) and the new-built house thereby built by my father, with all the lands 
and tenements thereto belonging and all such implements as I have in the 
said tenements, the said lands and tenements given by my father Thomas 
Pitt, as appeareth by his last will and testament. To my sons Henry and 
Thomas Pitt the years yet to come in a lease for two tenements and garden 
that I have in Redcliffe Street (and other leases). To my niece Ann 
Watteres a lease of forty years in the tenements at the Marsh gate wherein 
William Dale now dwelleth, but if she die before the expiration of said lease 
I give the residue to my nephew Robert Mericke, they paying unto my sou 
William four pounds six shillings eight pence a year rent and he to pay the 
lord's rent. If Robert Miricke die before the forty years be expired the 
residue shall be to my son William. Certain household stuff" to William. To 
Maude my lesser Ciprus (sic) chest. To my daughter Mary Pitt my chain 
of gold and to my daughter Anne Pitt my white silver and gilt tankard 
which was given them by my father and to Martha the inlaid chest in the 
great chamber. I give to my son William Pitt my best Turkies (sic) ring 
which was my great grandfathers Mr Roger Cooke's, my second ring with 
a pearl I give to my son Robert, my signet ring I give to my son Henry 
and my ruby ring I give to my son Thomas. My books I give to my sou 
William. A lot of household stuff to be sold and a quarter part of the 
sum made thereof to be given to wife and three quarters to the children, or 
else to be divided (without selling it). Sons William, Robert, Henry and 
Thomas to have their portions on arriving at age of one and twenty and 
daughters Mary, Anne, Maude and Martha at times of marriage or at twenty 
one, and so one after the other. I give to my brother in law Mr Richard 
Davis twenty shillings to make him a ring for a token and to sister Mary 
Davis a double Harry sovereign of gold. To my sister Marlowe and sister 
Gonning, each a rose noble of gold. To my cousin Mary Robinson ten 
shillings in gold. To my sister Alice Knight a gown to the value of three 
pounds and a double duckett (sic) iu gold and to my brother Knight ten 



1006 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

shillings in gold. To my cousin William Pitt, draper, a double ducat in 
gold and to my wife a square ducat in gold which my mother gave me. 
All these tokens are in an ivory box in my counter ; the box by itself I give 
to my sister Mary Davis for a token. I give to my cousin William Pitt, 
draper, forty shillings to make him a ring and to my cousin Nicholas Pickes 
thirty shillings to make him a ring for tokens. To the poor of St. Thomas, 
of Temple and of Redclif parishes three pounds to be distributed amongst the 
three parishes. A great part of my estates is in debts and beyond seas. 
Any loss shall be borne upon all my legacies rateably upon the pound. 
What gold or jewels my wife had of her own and in her keeping at the 
date hereof I give to her. My debts and legacies being paid all my goods 
and chattels unbequeathed I give unto my loving wife Mary and to my son 
William whom I make joint executors &c. and do appoint my well beloved 
cousins Mr. William Pitt, draper, and Mr Nicholas Pikes, gen 1 ., overseeis. 
Witnessed by Ric: Marlowe, Nicholas Pike and Richard Griffeth. 

Published (after alterations made) 30 October 1624, in presence of 
William Pitt, Edward Batten, Abraham Edwards. 

Proved by the oaths of Mary Pitt, relict, and William Pitt, son, &c. be- 
fore Richard Knight vicar of Temple &c. Clarke, 19. 

William Pitt of the city of Bristol, merchant, son of Mary Pitt of 
the same city, widow, 2 October 1630, proved 9 June 1631. My will is 
that all mine estate shall be tied to make good my father's debts and 
legacies, and they being paid, if so much shall remain, all mine household 
stuff shall be divided among my mother, sisters and brothers, whereof my 
mother shall have a quarter and the other three quarters be equally divided 
amongst my brothers and sisters. My brother Henry and sister Mavvd, 
when they shall have their portions due, shall have the full sum given them 
by my father with their parts of my brother Thomas and sister Martha's 
legacies, and shall then receive interest at 8 p.c. for their whole portions both 
given them by my father and due to them by the death of my brother Thomas 
and sister Martha, and the interest to be continued from my father's death. 
Reference to brother Robert and sisters Mary and Anne as having received 
their legacies. To the poor of Redcliffe, St. Thomas and Temple parishes. 
My mother shall have my spruce chest, my brother Robert the Hand 
counter, my sister Mary the great tankard, my sister Anne the cedar chest, 
my brother Henry my silver posnett and taster, my sister Maud the silver 
goblet and two of my father's spoons. And I desire my mother, Mrs Mary 
Pitt, to see this my will performed. St. John, 7<». 

William Pitt of the city of Bristol, alderman, 18 October 1631, 
proved 12 January 1631. To wife Sara twenty pounds to buy her a ring 
of five diamonds, in lieu of one she weareth which my wife Elizabeth gave 
to her daughter Mary Pitt, which ring my will is that my daughter 
Mary Pitt shall enjoy according to her mother's desire. Four hun- 
dred pounds each to sons William, Henry, John and Thomas Pitt. 
Five hundred pounds each to eldest daughter Mary Pitt and youngest 
daughter Martha Pitt (the latter apparently under one and twenty). To 
my daughter Ann Whetcombe one hundred pounds upon condition that her 
father in law Mr Robert Whetcombe do perforin his promise (that is to 
say) to grant no estates from the time of the marriage of his son John 
Whetcombe to my daughter Anne Whetcombe of forty pounds per annum 
in the manor of Thornefford the which he promised to lay as demeaues to 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1007 

annex it to the old rent for the better help of his son and my daughter after 
his father's decease. To iny sister Anne Gethinge forty pounds. To my 
sister Mary Batten five pounds to buy her a ring. To my daughter in law 
Elizabeth Chetwin five pounds to buy her a ring. To Edward Pitt, the 
son of my brother John, twenty pounds at one and twenty years of age. 
To Mary Pitt, the daughter of my brother John, ten pounds at day of 
marriage or one and twenty years of age. To the companies of Tuckers 
and Shermen five pounds to be divided amongst the poorest of those com- 
panies. I ordain my good friends, my brother Mr Ezekiel Waliis, my 
brother Edward Batten, Mr John Taylor and Mr Robert Elliott to be 
overseers and give them five pounds apiece for their pains &c. The rest of 
my goods &c. I give and bequeath unto my well beloved son and heir Edward 
Pitt, whom I make and ordain my whole and sole executor, requiring him, 
upon my blessing, to see my will performed according as I desire and to be 
helpfull to his brethren and sisters according to his power; and do desire 
God to bless them all. Audley, 2. 

Mary Pitt of the parish of St. Thomas within the city of Bristol, 
widow, 8 June 1634, proved 25 November 1634. I will that eight pounds, 
according to the gift and intent of my son William Pitt, in his last will and 
testament, be given, disposed and bestowed in land by my executor, to re- 
main for ever, to be divided amongst the poor people of the parishes of 
St. Thomas, St. Mary Redcliffe and Temple parish in Bristol, being to be 
settled in land to remain for ever, and the better part of the three parts 
thereof to be given to St. Thomas parish. I give and bequeath to Mary 
Newell and to John Newell her son the sum of one hundred and twenty 
pounds of lawful money in manner and form following, that is to say, to 
my said daughter Newell the use only of the said one hundred and twenty 
pounds so long as she and her now husband Andrew Newell liveth, which 
I will shall be paid unto her yearly by my executor at the four usual Feast 
Days in the year, viz', the feast day of the Nativity of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ, the Annunciation of our blessed Lady St. Mary the Virgin, 
St. John the Baptist and St. Michael the Arch " Angle " &c, &c. and in 
case my said daughter shall outlive her said husband then my will is that my 
said executor shall, within one year next after the death of the said Andrew 
Newell, pay unto my said daughter Mary the sum of one hundred pounds 
of the said sum given as aforesaid and shall reserve twenty pounds of the 
said six score pounds in his, my executor's, hands until the said John Newell 
her son shall attain to the age of one and twenty years and then to pay the 
said twenty pounds to him the said John Newell. If my said daughter die 
before the said Andrew her husband the whole sum shall remain iu the 
hands of my executor until the said John Newell shall attain to the said 
ao-e and then my said executor to pay the six score pounds unto my said 
grandchild; for it is not my will that the said Andrew Newell, his father, 
should enjoy any part thereof nor any the profit or interest thereof. My 
said daughter Mary to have the profit and rent of the term of years yet to 
come of and in one tenement at Portwalls, now in the possession of Law- 
rence Wilson, (her husband to have nothing therein) and after her decease 
I give the said house and remainder of the term unto my ,son Henry Pitt. 
I give unto my said daughter Mary Newell all my wearing apparel, except 
my best gown and petticoat which I give unto my daughter Mawde Pitt. I 
give unto the said Mary my wedding ring. I give unto my daughter Mawde 
Pitt one hundred pounds and all my childbed linen &c. and my diamond 



1008 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

ring. To my daughter Anne Edwardes sixty pounds &c. and my ring with 
a " Turkie " stone therein. To my daughter Martha Pitt my ring with a 
ruby stone in it. To my son Robert Pitt all that my lands and grounds, 
with the appurtenances &c, which I lately purchased of one Thomas Cow- 
dry, being part of the manor of Compton Magna in the County of Somerset, 
to hold for life, and after his decease to William his son, with remainder 
to Robert, the second son of the said Robert my son, and then to the right 
heirs of my said son. I give to my said son Robert all my part of the 
land and tenements situate and being in the Pittie (sic) within the city of 
Bristol. To my son Henry Pitt tlie house in Redcliffe Street wherein I 
now dwell and one little house in the possession of one John Cole, being 
purchased with the said dwelling house, with household stuff &c. &c. I give 
him also a tenement upon the back in Bristol, held of the Chamber of the 
said city and now in the possession of William Prosser, and two other tene- 
ments in Redcliffe Street, held of the Dean and Chapter of Bristol, one in 
the possession of Thomas Dayes and the other in the possession of Thomas 
Hudson, and a little garden ground in St. Thomas Lane in Bristol. I give 
the said Henry also fifty pounds in money. To William Edwards my 
grandchild one silver and gilt beaker. Another to John Pitt my grand- 
child. To my grandchild Robert Pitt one silver and gilt saltcellar and to 
my grandchild John Edwards a silver beer bowl. I make my son Robert 
executor and my loving brothers in law Mr Abraham Edwards and Mr 
John Pearse, to whom I give forty shilling apiece, overseers. I give to my 
grandchild William Pitt my silver tankard which was my son William's. 
My sister Pearse to have four pounds to buy her a mourning gown. Mr 
Loveringe to preach my funeral sermon and to have four pounds for his pains. 
My brother Pawle to have forty shillings to buy him a mourning cloak and 
sister Bushe five pounds for her mourning. Seager, 97. 

Edward Batten of Bristol gentleman, 15 September 1638, proved 16 
November 1638. The poor of Temple parish in Bristol. Wife Mary 
Batten. My three tankards which I bought of my cousin Pitt I give to my 
three grandchildren and godsons Edward Hobbs, son of Thomas Hobbs, 
Edward Galhampton, son of William Galhampton, and Edward Colston, 
son of William Colston, the eldest of them to choose first. To my daughter 
Mary Hobbs and her heirs,after the death of my wife, my tenements in Bristol 
lying between Key and Marsh street and the Lanthorn tenement and the 
sum of five hundred pounds. To my daughter Elizabeth Batten the leases of 
mv lands in Westerley which I hold of Mr Roberts. To my daughter Sarah 
Colston for her better maintenance of her and her husband &c. all my lands 
and leases in both the Ilambrookes in the parish of Winterborne. My 
daughter Anne Dollinge. My daughter Martha Galhampton. My tene- 
ment in Bristol wherein my son in law Colston dwelleth. My daughter 
Anne's husband John Dolling and her daughter Mary Dolling and the rest 
of her children. I do give unto Edward Batten and William Pitt my 
cousins forty pounds apiece, at my executor's discretion, committing them 
to his care. My sister in law Mrs Gittin* and her children. My brother 
Symon Batten. My son in law Mr Thomas Hobbes I appoint executor 
and do desire my cousin Mr Edward Pitt and Mr Richard Meredith, vicar of 
Stogarsey, to be the overseers. Published the 16 th of September 1638. 

Lee, 156. 

* Referred to in will of William Pitt ( 1631) as " lister Anne Gethinge." 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1009 

Sarah NETHWAY of Bristol, widow of Thomas Nethway merchant 
deceased, her will made 11 January 1640, witli a codicil hearing date 27 
February 1640 and a later codicil 7 March 1640, proved 18 June 1641. 
To he buried in the church of St. Walburgh near deceased husband. My 
loving brother Mr George Lane, merchant, to he executor and my trusty 
friends M r . Giles Elbridge and Mr. Joseph Jackson, merchants, to be over- 
seers. Children under age. My sister Laurence. My sister Butler and 
her three children which she had by John Hurston, viz 1 . Laurence, John 
and Anne Hurston. My brother in law William Holman. Certain friends 
and servants and poor householders. Whereas my brother in law Mr 
Edward Pitt, now one of the Sheriffs of the said city of Bristol, and Mr 
John Goning, merchant, became bound to my deceased husband for the 
payment of two hundred and fifty pounds within a short time after the 
death of my sister in law Mrs Pitts I will that my eldest son Thomas 
Nethway shall have the full benefit of the said bond. My daughter Sarah. 
My sou George. My five children, Thomas, George, John, Sarah and 
Elizabeth. 

My sister Butler's husband. My husband died without a will. George 
and Richard, the sons of brother George Lane. Richard Nethway, brewer. 

My cousin Hall in mo: (sic) to be paid unto her &c. My sister 

Jone Lane. My sister Anne Butler. To my daughter Sarah Nethway the 
four pictures of her grandmother, father and mother which hang in my 
chamber and ever my counter door. P^velyn, 74. 

William Pitt of London, merchant, 19 March, 1645, proved 23 
August 1647. The poor of St. Nicholas parish in Bristol. My loving 
brother in law Mr William Chetwind to see it distributed, or, if he be dead, 
my brother in law Mr. Walter Sandy. My loving sister Elizabeth Chet- 
wind, wife of the said William Chetwind. My loving sister Mary Sandy 
wife of the said Walter Sandy. My loving sister Anne Wetcome wife of 

Whetcome. My loving sister Martha Willet wife unto William 

Willet. My cousin William Pitt, second son unto my brother Edward Pitt 
deceased. His sister or sisters. Mr William Pearse. Others named. My 
loving brother Thomas Pitt, or, if he dead, my cousin William Pitt afore- 
said, to be executor. 

Commission issued on the above date to William Chetwind the husband 
of Elizabeth Chetwind als Pitt, sister of the deceased William Pitt, 
bachelor, to administer during the absence of Thomas Pitt, brother and 
executor &c. Fines, 182. 

Thomas Pitt of the city of Bristol, merchant, 27 February 1655, 
proved 26 March 1657. All my nephews and all my nieces. My two 
sisters Mary Saney (sic) and Martha Willett. My loving brothers Walter 
Saney and William Willett. Loving friend Hugh Roberts. John Bing- 
ham. Ruthen, 105. 

[The foregoing wills relate to the Pitt family of Bristol to which belonged 
Maud the wife of Richard Russell and Mary the wife of Andrew Newell, both 
of Charlestown, Massachusetts. They were two of the daughters of William 
Pitt of Bristol, whose will, proved 4 February 1G24-5, I have here given. And 
he was a son of that Thomas Pitt whose will has already been published among 
my Holworthy notes (Reg. vol. 45, p. 151 ; ante, p. 497). See also in the same 
volume (p. 150; ante, p. 49G) an earlier reference to this family in the will of 
John Man. In the same volume of the Register (pp. 229-230; ante, p. 512) 
see a note about Russell, Newell and Pitt connection. 



1010 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Since collecting the above notes for publication, I have gathered the fol- 
lowing will, which relates to this family and their connections. (See will of 
Thomas Pitt above referred to). Henry F. Waters.] 

Cicely Guning (or Gunning) of St. Stephen's, Bristol, widow, 2 
October 163<>, with a codicil dated 17 October 1631, proved 20 February 
1G31. To be buried in the church of St. Warborow's, in which parish 
1 was born. Brother Richard Marlow and my sister Mary his wife. Mary 
Camplin. My cousin Anne Ditcher the elder. My cousin Nicholas Peakes 
and his son Walter Peakes. My cousin William Hopkins, my sister's eldest 
son, and her son Robert Hopkins. My cousin Grace Ilewett. My cousin 
Thomas Williams. My cousin Walter Powell. Thomas and Walter 
Osborne. My cousin Alice Willis. Elizabeth Triggs. William Osborne 
of Coldashton. William Atwood of Deynton gen'. My aunt Freeman. 
The two children of Alice Willis. Martha Hopkins. My cousin John 
Betterton. Anne and Abigail Hopkins the two daughters of nephew 
William Hopkins. My sister Marlow's four children, William, Robert, 
Grace and Martha. Friends and kinsmen Mr. Nicholas Peakes, Mr. 
Peter Hewett, William Atwood and John lloyd (of Bristol, vintner). 
Anne Rycroft wife of Robert Rycroft. 

Commission issued 11 December 1648 to Peter Hewyt and Grace 
Hewyt, his wife, and to Henry Hippon and Martha Hippon, his wife, 
nieces on the sister's side &c. 

Another Registration on Folio 24. Audley, 13. 

William Chaplen of Long Melford in Suffolk, yeoman, 15 November 
1575, proved 25 January 1577. Body to be buried in the churchyard of 
Melford. The poor of Melford, Sudbury, Ackton, Foxherd, Borley and 
Lyston. My brother Clemente Chaplen. His eldest sou William, my god- 
son, at age of twenty one. My eldest son Edmunde. My daughter and 
his sister Alice. Mary Greengrasse daughter of John Greenegrasse late 
of Melford deceased. My sister Johan Ballard. Her two children, besides 
my godson, whom I shall hereafter consider. Ballardes boy now with 
me, lame. My godson, the son of my said sister Ballard, at twenty one. 
My daughter Alice shall have her mother's bequest. My two sons 
Edmund and William to be executors and Mr Roger Martvn of Melford 
to be supervisor. My brother Thomas Chaplen. 

Among the witnesses were William Payne and Edmunde Chaplin. 

Langley, 3. 

Edmond Chaplin of St. Giles without Cripplegate, London, gen 1 ., 3 
July 1618, proved 10 April 1641. Wife Anne. My manor of Linsey 
ah Lillesley, Suffolk. Lands &c. in Seamer, Whatfield and Nawton, Suf- 
folk. Lands in Hadleigh and Aldham Suffolk. My chamber at Gray's 
Inn. My new dwelling house in Grub street, St. Giles. My four children 
Edmund, William, Ursula and Elizabeth, the sons at one and twenty, the 
daughters at seventeen or days of marriage. Messuage called Clarke's 
with lands, dovehouse &c, in Lvnsey ah Lillisley, Kersey and Growton to 
my son Edmond. I desire my loving father and mother to have a care of 
my aforesaid children and to be as good, loving and kind unto them as they 
would have been unto me if it had pleased God that I had lived to enjoy 
their love and kindness. I do ordain and appoint my loving brothers in 
law Thoma- Bryan and John Wincoll to be the executors &c. and I give 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1011 

them ten pounds apiece and to each of their wives forty shillings to buy 
them rings. Augustine Rawe the younger, ray godsou. My brother in 
law Augustine Rawe to be overseer. I give him five pounds. 

Evelyn, 40. 

Samuel Cooke of Dublin, Ireland, 2 June 1642, proved 29 September 
1642. My mind and will is that Anne my wife shall enjoy my messuage 
called Rowse's &c. in St. Andrews and Ringfield, Suffolk, during her natu- 
ral life, she to receive the rents thereof according as the same is formerly 
assured unto her. And I give the same to my son John Cooke immediately 
after her decease. As for the rest of my whole estate my executors shall 
enter upon the same and shall receive such sums &c. as are or shall be due 
from any persons and shall employ and dispose thereof for the good and 
benefit of my daughter Anne Cooke and John Cooke my (sic) brother. 
They shall pay unto John Cooke my brother five hundred pounds at the 
end of six months next after the said John Cooke shall recover his perfect 
memory and understanding. And in case the said John shall die before he 
shall recover out of that melancholy course of life wherein he now liveth 
having issue of his body lawfully begotten they shall pay the said five hun- 
dred pounds unto the children of the said John &c, in discharge of all such 
covenants as are coutaiued in a pair of indentures, bearing date 19 April 
7 Charles, between me the said Samuel and Erasmus Cooke of the one part 
and William Fiske of Norton gen 1 of the other part. And my executors 
shall pay unto such persons as the said John shall reside and live with the 
half part of all such sums as shall be necessarily laid out and expended for 
the convenient sustenance and maintenance of the said John my brother 
from time to time &c. so long as the said John shall live in case the said 
sum of five hundred pounds shall remain upaid as aforesaid. My mind and 
desire is that Anne my wife shall dispose of and maintain John Cooke my 
son, allowing him such maintenance as she shall think fit (in regard that 
my estate is much decayed by reason of the late rebellion in Ireland). 
And my executors shall maintain Anne Cooke my daughter &c. The re- 
sidue I give to my said daughter, she to receive and enjoy the same when 
she shall attain unto the full age of one and twenty years. I do nominate 
and appoint Erasmus Cooke my brother, Thomas Cooke of the City of 
London, goldsmith, my kinsman, Clement Chaplaine of Wethersfield in 
New England my kinsman, and Tobias Norris of the City of Dublin in 
Ireland gen 1 to be the executors and John Fiske of Rattesden (Rattlesden) 
in Suffolk gen 1 ., my kinsman, to be supervisor of this my last Will &c. 

Wit: Augustine Dudley, Philip Kett. Cambell, 111. 

Thomas Chaplin, citizen and clothworker of London, 8 August 1655, 
proved 19 September 1655. I will that Mary my wife shall have to the full 
value of fifty pounds, iu money or goods at her own election and choice. 
My executors to purchase a good estate of land and tenements of the clear 
yearly value of forty-five pounds by the year, for the use of my wife for 
life, then to remain unto Thomas and William Chaplyn, the two sons of 
ray brother Samuel Chaplyn. And I will also that my brothers William 
Chaplyn, Clement Chaplyn and Daniel Chaplyn shall have of the next 
moueye that shall be raised out of ray personal estate, each of them one 
hundred pounds. The rest shall be equally parted and divided between the 
children of my said brother William. My wife and brother William to be 
executors. Aylett, 197. 



1012 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

[Other wills relating to this family of Chaplin have been already published 
in these Gleanings, pp. 32 and 77 (q. v.). Edrnond Chaplin, Avhose will I now 
give (written 1618, but not proved until 1641) must have been the son of that 
Edmund Chaplin of Little Waldingneld, Suffolk, whose will, dated 6 October 
1G18, refers to this son as " my late son." 

Henry F. Waters.] 

Henry Steevens, citizen and haberdasher of London, 4 October 1612. 
proved 10 October 1612. To my brother William Steevens at Bath my 
whole estate in the house that he dwelleth in &c, aud five hundred pounds. 
To John Dunster one hundred pounds. To my brother Robert Stevens 
one hundred pounds. To John Saunders thirty pounds. To David 
Woodrooffe ten pounds. To John Atkyns thirty pounds. To my aunt 
Pinchon ten pounds. To my uncle William Hamore twenty pounds. 
Certain servants. To Roger Dunster forty shillings to make him a ring. 
To my cousin Richard Prowude forty pounds. To my brother in law 
Raphe Hamore ten pounds. To mine uncle Josias Barry five pounds 
and to his sou Henry Barry, my godson, ten pounds. To my aunt Quille 
forty shillings and to her daughter twenty shillings. To William Tucker 
three pounds and to his brother Thomas Tucker ten pounds. To Mr. 
Thompson preacher of Bristol ten pounds. To Mr. Doughtie of Bristol 
forty shillings, to make him a ring, and to my consin John Tulie the like 
sura &c. To John Godskall the son of James Godskall forty shilling &c. 
All the above legacies to be paid out of one third part of my estate, one 
third being reserved unto Mary my loving wife, according to the laudable 
custom of the City of London, and the other third part to and amongst my 
three children, Barbara, Henry and Mary. My brother Robert Stevens 
to be full and whole executor and the foreuamed John Dunster and John 
Tooly to be aiding unto him. 

Among other witnesses, Teste me Willmo Hamore p T ntium Scriptore. 

Fenner, 87. 

Raphe Hamor citizen and merchant taylor of London, 5 August 1615, 
proved 16 August 1615. To be buried in the parish church of St. Nicholas 
Aeon, where I was born, nigh the place where my father lieth or near the 
place where my wife lieth. My goods shall be divided into three equal parts 
according to the laudable custom of the City of London, one part to remain 
unto my now wife Susan, one other third to be divided to and amongst my 
children, Raphe, Mary and Jane, saving only two hundred pounds to be first 
deducted out of the said part and allowed to my said son Raphe Hamor, 
and the remainder to be equally divided. If my son Raphe die before he 
shall be married or receive the said two hundred pounds the said sum shall 
be equally divided amongst the children of my son Thomas Hamor. If my 
eldest son Thomas shall demand any of the second third part then my ex- 
ecutrix shall demand and have of him the sum of fourteen hundred pounds 
which he oweth unto me for money which I have lent and paid for him over 
and above one thousand pounds which I bestowed upon him to begin the 
world withall, which was a greater portion than I could well give to any 
of the rest of my children. But, being my eldest son, I was in hopes to 
have received joy and comfort in seeing him do well, which caused me to 
strain myself to do him good. For the other third part, reserved unto my- 
self, I do give and bequeath the same as foil oweth (then follows a series of 
legacies). The children of my daughter Mary. My sou in law John Col- 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1013 

lett (apparently her husband). The children of my daughter Jane. viz 1 . 
Raphe Langley and Jane, Sarah and Anne Langley. My brother William 
Hamor and his children, viz*. Lettice Atkinson, Sarah Hamor, Robert 
Hamor, Jane Hamor aud William Hamor. My grandchild Thomas Hamor 

(a minor). Elizabeth and Hamor, daughters of my son Thomas. 

The Worshipful Company of Merchant taylors. The Company of 
Clothworkers. The Mayor aud his brethren, for the time being, of the 
City of Exeter. John, Thomas and William Tooker sons of my brother 
John Tooker deceased. Bathsheba Snelliug at day of her marriage. My 
brother in law Jonas Owen. The brothers and sisters of the said Bath- 
sheba. To Christ's Hospital in London. The parish of St. Nicholas 
Aeon. The parish of All Hallows in Bread Street. My wife Susan to be 
sole executrix. And I desire my loving cousin Israel Owen, Christofer 
Barron my son in law, and my brother Snelliug to be overseers of this 
my will. 

One of the witnesses was John Milton scr. Rudd, 78. 

Sententia pro confirmatione testamenti Radulphi Hamor nuper dum vixit 
parochie Omnium Sanctorum in Bread Street, Civitatis London &c. de- 
functi was pronounced 16 February 1620 in a cause between Sara Baron, 
executrix of the will of Susan Hamor deceased, while she lived executrix 
named in the will of the said Ralph Hamor deceased, on the one part and 
William Hamor, the brother, and Thomas and Ralph Hamor the sons of 
the said Ralph Hamor deceased, on the other part. Dale, 12. 

[Ralph Hamor, a member of the Merchant Taylor's Company of London, and 
interested in colonization, was the father of Ralph.Hamor, the younger, author 
of " A Trve Discovrse of the Present Estate of Virginia," London 1615. For 
accounts of both father and son see Alexander Brown's " Genesis of the United 
States," Vol. II., p. 908. The will of Susan Hamor, widow of the testator, 
Ralph Hamor, the elder, is printed on page 248.— Editor.] 

Anne Noyes of Cholderton, Wilts, widow, 18 March 1655, proved 21 
April 1658. I give and bequeath to James and Nicholas Noyes, my two 
sons, now in New England, twelve pence apiece and to such children as 
they have living twelve pence apiece. To my son in law Thomas Kent of 
Upper Wallop twelve pence, to his wife five shillings and to their children 
twelve pence apiece. To Robert Read of Cholderton in the Co. of South- 
ampton, gen'., all the rest and residue &c, and I do make the said Robert 
Rede sole executor. Signed Anne Noyce. Wootton, 130. 

[Anne Noyes, a sister of Rev. Robert Parker, and aunt to the mother of 
Benjamin Woodbridge, Harvard's first graduate, and to Rev. Thomas Parker, 
first minister at Newbury, Mass., was the widow of Rev. William Noyes, in- 
cumbent of the church of St. Nicholas, Cholderton, "Wilts, 1601-21. He was 
succeeded by his son, Rev. Nathan Noyes, who continued in residence till 1651. 
The church is ancient, the primal advowson being dated in 1175. A complete 
list of incumbents since 1297 is preserved. In 1850, the present church edifice 
Avas consecrated. The parish register exists since 165-1, none having been kept 
before that date. The earliest recorded baptism is that of "Joan, daughter 
of Edmund Noyes, 25 May 1652." The earliest recorded burial is that of " Alice 
Smith, widdow, 13 Sept. 1653." A terrier, an inventory of the property belong- 
ing to the rectory, dated 13 Dec. 1677, is signed by Richard Noyes, Edward 
Noyes and others. Cholderton is a parish in the hundred of Amesbury, five 
miles distant from the town. It is situated on the river Bourne, on the 
border of the counties of Wilts and Southampton. It is sometimes called 
West Cholderton to distinguish it from the parish of Cholderton. Hampshire, 
which is known as East Cholderton. The parishes lie on the main road from 
Amesbury to Audover. 






1014 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

The testatrix's son James, bora 1608, was "the blessed light of Newbury," 
teacher of the church there from its formation, 1636, till his death in 1656. He 
was the author, 1641, of " a catechism for the instruction of children," by desire 
of the general court. The other son, Nicholas, born 1614, was deacon of the 
church at Newbury, and died in 1701. Descendants of both are numerous. 
Another son, Nathan, his father's successor in the Cholderton church, had died in 
1651. He was buried at Salisbury, with an inscription : " Here lyeth interred the 
body of Mr. Nathan Noyes, a godly painful and constant preacher of God's 
Word at West Choldrington in this County for the space of 32 years, who 
departed this life the 6th day of September An. Do. 1651. his age was neere 54 
veares." 

Upper Wallop is a parish in Hampshire, about ten miles from Cholderton, 
midway between Andover and Salisbury. Richard and Stephen Kent were fel- 
low settlers at Newbury with James and Nicholas Noyes. Thomas Kent was an 
earlier settler at Gloucester. 

The name of Robert Read appears in the Calendar of State Papers, Charles II. 
1662, as follows : " The King wishes Robert Reade of Cholderton to be appre- 
hended and examined on Edw. Jasper's information." Geo. A. Gordon.] 

Moses Browne citizen and founder of London, 30 May 1688, with a 
codicil 1 June 1688, proved 14 June 1688. To my sister Margaret Vent- 
ham one hundred and fifty pounds. To my sister Dorothy Riggs the like 
sum. To my sister Sarah Noyse of New England one hundred pounds. 
To her two sons William and Joseph Noyse fifty pounds apiece. To my 
cousin Rebecca Ventham one hundred and fifty pounds. To my cousin 
Rebecca Jaques one hundred and fifty pounds. To my cousin Anne Mar- 
shal the like sum. To my cousin Dorothy Gillife one hundred pounds. To her 
son Benjamin Gillife fifty pounds. To my cousin Willoughby Browne two 
hundred pounds. To my cousin Elizabeth Browne the like sum. To my 
cousin Peter Browne one hundred and fifty pounds. To my cousin Thomas 
Carter one hundred pounds. To my cousin Ruth Whithcock fifty pounds. 
To my cousin Elizabeth Court the like sum. To my cousin Stockwell ten 
pounds. To my cousin Benjamin Wilkes, brewer, the like sum and the 
like to my cousin Richard Browne. The poor pensioners of the Com- 
pany of Founders of London. Dr. Ansley, Mr. Cole and Mr. Barker, 
ministers. I give, devise and bequeath unto the said Benjamin Wilks 
and Richard Brown and my cousin Richard Ventham of Andover, clothier, 
all my messuages, lands, &c. in Ilson upon the Hill or elsewhere in the 
Co. of Leicester upon special trust &c. to sell all the above for payment 
of legacies &c. In case my cousin Thomas Brown shall, within two 
months next after my decease, deliver or cause to be delivered up unto 
my said sister Margaret Ventham, to be cancelled, all such bonds and 
obligations wherein my said sister's late husband became bound or obliged 
unto James Brown, father of the said Thomas Brown, for eighty pounds, 
or any other sum, then I give and bequeath unto the said Thomas Brown 
all such moneys as belong to me in the East India Company of Loudon. 
I will that gloves shall be given at my funeral and that my funeral charges 
shall not exceed forty pounds in the whole. I do make the said Benjamin 
Wilkes, Richard Browne and Richard Ventham joint executors and appoint 
my loving friends Mr. Isaac Chancey of London, physician, and John Dakins 
of London, scrivener, to be overseers. 

In the codicil he mentions having given bond unto Mary Butler, execu- 
trix of the last will of late brother Thomas Browne deceased, with condition 
to pay unto cousin James Browne, since deceased (who was brother to the 
within named Thomas Browne) three hundred pounds, or some other sum 
of money, and testator expressly wills and declares that the said Thomas 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1015 

Browne, within named, shall not have, receive &c. the legacy in the East 
India Company, or any part thereof unless he deliver up to the executors 
the said obligation to be cancelled or made void. Exton, 75. 

The Will and Testament of Samuel Jackson, son to Mr. Edmund Jack- 
son late of Boston, 7 August 1642, proved 21 November 1646. I do freely 
give unto my loving brother Nathaniel Jackson, son to my father Edmond 
Jackson, the sum of five pounds which was left me by my uncle Mr. John 
Storie at his death, which was due unto me the fifteenth day of March last past, 
A.D. 164 1 , and was to be paid me by Mrs. Millicent Storie, wife to Mr. John 
Storie, whom he left his executor. And I do freely give unto my sister 
Sarah Jack>on. daughter to my father &c, eight pounds which was given 
me at the death of my grandfather Mr. Robert Story, due to me the fifteenth 
day of March last, and five pounds which was given me by the will of my 
grandmother Mrs. Elizabeth Storie, wife to Mr. Robert Storie, which was 
left to be paid by my uncle Storie, son to the said Robert and Elizabeth 
Storie, due to me the fifteenth day of March aforesaid, but with a proviso 
that the said Sarah pay unto John Perrott, citizen and merchant taylor of 
London, who liveth in Abchurch Lane in the parish of St. Nicholas Aeons, 
the sum of twenty shillings which I borrowed of him for my own use. 
And I do give unto my brother Elisha Jackson, son &c, twenty shillings to 
be paid unto him or whom he shall appoint. And I do likewise give to my 
sister Mary, now Mary Woodward, living in Boston in New England, twenty 
shillings, to be paid to her or her child or to my brother Elisha if in case 
she should die ; so likewise if my brother Elisha should die before the receipt 
thereof to fall to my sister Mary Jackson, and if they both die to fall to my 
sister Sarah. 

Wit: John Fullerton. 

Commission, as above, to Nathaniel Jackson, brother &c, to administer 
the goods &c. according to the tenor of the above will, no executor having 
been named. Twisse, 160. 

[In the Probate Act Book for the year 164G the testator of the above will is 
called '-late of Boston in the Co. of Lincoln." H. F. Waters.] 

Martha Lee of Mansel Street in Goodmans Fields in the parish of St 
Mary Matfellon als Whitechapel, Middlesex, widow, 26 April 1725, proved 
5 May 1725. I give all my messuage &c. in Gracechurch Street, London, 
and all my lands in Cope parish or elsewhere in the Co. of Westmoreland and 
Colony of Virginia, in parts beyond the seas, unto my son George Lee &c. 
for ever. I give all my messuages, lands &c. in the Co. of Suffolk (sub- 
ject to a mortgage and subject also to the payment of one hundred pounds 
to Daniel Watts, at one and twenty, pursuant to the will of Thomas Moore, 
my former husband deceased) unto my two daughters Martha Lee and 
Lettice Lee &c, share and share alike as tenants in common and not as 
joint tenants &c. If all my said three children, George, Martha and Lettice 
Lee, shall happen to die without issue I give and devise my said estate in 
the city of London unto such of the children of my late brother John Silk 
deceased and of the children of my brother Abraham Silk as shall be then 
living &c, and then also I give my said estate in Suffolk to my brother 
Tobias Silk. To my very good friend Mr. Oliver Marton of the Temple, 
my brother the said Tobias Silk and William Wareham, citizen and barber 
surgeon of London, ten pounds apiece for mourning. The residue of my 



1016 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

personal estate to my said three children, equally to he divided among them 
at ages of one and twenty years &c. My brother Tobias and the said Mr. 
William Wareham to be their guardians. To Ruth Hill, widow, and 
Neomi Hill, her daughter, five pounds apiece to put themselves into mourn- 
ing. Romney, 114. 

Edward Sprague of Upway, Dorset, fuller, 6 June 1614. proved 13 
October 1614. My body to be buried within the churchyard. To the parish 
church of Upway ten shillings. To the poor teu shillings. To Ralph 
Sprague my eldest son one of the oldest pair of shears in my shop and one 
lesser pair called the "quarrell." To my eldest daughter Alice Sprague fifty 
pounds. To Edward, my second sou, two pair of shears and twenty pounds. 
To Richard, my third sou twenty pounds at one and twenty years of age. 
To Christopher, my fourth son, twenty pounds at one and twenty. To 
William, my youngest son, twenty pounds at one and twenty. All the rest 
of my goods &c. to Christian Sprague my wife, whom I do make my whole 
executrix. And I do appoiut Henry Sanvoyes (Qu. Samwayes ?) and 
William Bryer overseers. 

W T it: John Bishoppe and John Tayler (by mark). 

Memorandum that whereas the living of the abovesaid Edward Sprague 
doth fall unto his son Ralphe Sprague after his decease the said Ralfe 
Sprague doth, upon his father's request promise that his mother Christian 
Sprague shall quietly enjoy the said living until he shall be one and twenty 
years of age. Lawe, 104. 

[Ralph, Richard and William Sprague, sons of the testator, came to New Eng- 
land and settled at Charlestown. William afterwards removed to Hingham. See 
Wyman's Charlestowu, Vol. II., pp. 887-93; History of Hingham, Vol. III., pp. 
168-183; Savage's Genealogical Dictionary, Vol. IV., pp. 153-6; and Memoirs 
of the Sprague Family, by Richard Soule jr., pp. 78-97. — Editor.] 

The last will and testament of James Carter, 5 September 1626, proved 
11 April 1627. I give and bequeath one black cloak lined with velvet and 
a seal ring unto my brother John Carter and thirty pounds sterling to be 
divided equally amongst his children, as also ten pounds sterling unto 
William Symons children. To my cousin Richard Perry and his wife and 
William White and his wife, each of them, five pounds sterling apiece, to 
make them rings. To my wife's brothers and sisters forty shillings apiece 
(for rings). To Mr. Sedgwicke forty shillings in gold and forty shillings to 
the poor of that parish. Also I give fifty acres of land which I bought of 
my Lady Dales in Shurley Hundred Hand (sic) unto the parish whereof 
now Mr. Prohy is minister, to be a place of " Residencye " for hiui and such 
as shall succeed him in that parish. I make my wife Susanna Carter my 
sole executrix. Also my will and desire is that Mr. Nathaniel Causy (or 
Causy) and Richard Love should have the oversight of the shipping my 
goods in the upland and Robert Sweete and Richard Love for the lowland, 
for which their pains I give them whatsoever they will demand. Further- 
more, God sending the ship well home to her port, I entreat my trusty and 
well beloved friends and kinsmen Richard Perry and John Perry to have 
the oversight of such goods of mine as then come home in the aforesaid 
ship, as also to assist my wife in all tilings which may concern her good, 
for which I give them thirty pounds sterling, which, together with the rest of 
the legacies, I will should be paid four months after the goods are sold aud 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1017 

the money received. Also I give unto uiy servant James Ostin one whole 
year of his time, hoping he will be the more careful and ready to please my 
well beloved wife, whom, as the last testimony of love, I intreat God to 
bless spiritually, temporally and eternally. 

Wit: Richard Lowe, Richard Clifton, Greavell Pooly Cleric: . 

Skynner, 41. 

Zaciiakie Irish, one of the petty canons of H. M. Free Chapel within 
his Castle of Windsor, 7 dune 1672, proved 1 July 1672. To be buried 
in the upper Cloisters of the said Chapel. To Richard Newman, my 
nephew, now living in Dartmouth in Devon one hundred pounds. To his 
son, my godson, twenty pounds. To his brother Edward Newman, now in 
Virginia, ten pounds if living. To Sabyna Newman, their sister, if living, 
ten pounds. To my brother in law Master Robert Parsons five pounds. 
To his son Simon Parsons twenty pounds. To my nephew Robert Parsons, 
son to Robert, ten pounds. To his brother and my nephew Thomas Par- 
sons ten pounds. To my cousin William Hopwood five pounds. To my 
brother in law John Weekes three score pounds. To his two daughters 
Johanna and Elizabeth ten pounds apiece. To my brother in law Master 
Anthony Weekes ten pounds. To his daughter Ureth Weekes ten pounds. 
To my sister in law Joane Foxwell ten pounds. To her son Zacharie Fox- 
well, and my grandson, twenty pounds. To my sister in law Elizabeth 
Perrye's daughter Ureth five pounds. To my sister in law Margery 
Michell's daughters Susan and Margey five pounds apiece. Other friends 
and servants. I do nominate and appoint Richard Newman, my nephew, 
of Dartmouth, Devon, merchant, and John Weekes, my brother in law, of 
Petworth, Sussex, gentleman, my sole executors. Eure, 89. 

William Golde of Bovington in the Co. of Hertford. 26 June 1568, 
proved 9 December 1568. I give to my son John forty shillings (and other 
legacies). To John my son twenly shillings, to be paid at the age of 
twenty seven years by William Gold my son. To Josapth my son twenty 
shillings and one lamb and one platter and one sheet. To Jhosaffe my son 
twenty shillings, to be paid at the age of twenty one by William Gold my 
son. Similar bequests to son Thomas and to daughters Elnere, Elizabeth, 
Jane and Jone. To Alice Golde my cousin one sheet with a black seam 
and one platter. To Robert Golde one platter. I will that Alice my wife 
shall dwell and occupy the one half of my house and land for the term of 
ten years if she keep herself sole and unmarried. I will Alice my wife 
shall take half the children with her. The residue to wife Alice and son 
William, whom I make full executors &c, and desire William Shakemaple 
to be overseer. 

Wit: T. Gold, Rob te Puddyfut, John Gold, Edffide Grove, with others. 

Hitchin Registry. Hunts and Herts Wills. 
Archdeaconry of Huntington Vol. 1, fol. 126. 

Joan Wells of Bovingdon, Herts, widow, 4 December 1583, proved 
21 May 1584. To be buried in the churchyard of Bovingdon. Joane 
Axtell my daughter unmarried. Alice Axtell my daughter. Agnes Ax- 
tell my daughter. Tymothie Axtell the son of Henry Axtell, my son. 
Jeames Heart the son of Thomas Harte, my son in law. Alice Hart 
the daughter of the said Thomas. Agnis Goold the daughter of Hughe 
Goold, my son in law. John Goold the son of the said Hugh. Susanne 
Goold the daughter of the said Hugh. Anne Goolde the wife of the said 



1018- GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Mucrh Goold. Joane Hart my daughter. I make my son Henry Axtell 
sole executor. I constitute and make my beloved in Christ Thomas Axtell 
and Thomas Hart my son in law, of Boviugdon, the overseers. All the 
residue to be divided equally between Henry Axtell my son and Joane Hart 
my daughter. 

Wit: Thomas Wilcockes, Richard Axtell, Thomas Hay. 

Hitchin Registry, Hunts aud Herts Wills, 
(prob. Vol. 3)— 1579-1614— fol. 54. 

Thomas Priest of Bovingdon, Herts, yeoman, 24 April 1598, proved 
17 June 1598. Wife Ellyn. Son Thomas. Son Abraham. Daughter 
Alese. Daughter Sara. Daughter Anne and Uer children. Son John's 
children. Son William's children. William Goulde's son of the half acre, 
my godson. Wife Elline to be sole executrix, and I appoint to be over- 
seers William Goulde of the half acre aud John Goulde of the lane aud 
John Priest my eldest son. 

Wit : Jjohu Guide & John Goulde 

of merchantes X marke 

Hitchin Reg. &c. Vol. 4* (1593-1606) fol. 8. 

The name of Ry chard Goulde appears as a witness to will of William 
Edmand of Bovingdon 7 August 1598. (Same Vol.) fol. 23. 

John Gould of Merchants in Bovingdon, 2 November 1602, proved 
20 November 1602. To my daughter Rebecka my house &c. in Hempsted 
for the term of six years from the Feast of St. Michael last past, keeping 
same in good reparations from time to time. And after the expiration of 
the said six years the said house at Hempsted shall remain and be unto 
Nathan, my son, and his heirs forever. To Nathan certain furniture &c. To 
my son Jeremy my close called Cockarames, lying in Bovingdon, containing 
by estimation three acres, more or less, butting upon the hay lane. I give 
also unto Jeremy my son a great chest of oak standing in the chamber over 
the hall. I give my close called Shanckes, lying at sand pitts, containing 
by estimation three acres, to Thomas my son &c, and I give uuto him the 
great white chest. To Symou my son (certain furniture) in that my house 
called Boyears, and he shall suffer it to remain for the use of Presilla my 
daughter for the term of six years. To son Steven the great chest of oak 
that I myself do use. To Elizabeth my wife my house that I do dwell in, 
called Merchants, and ten acres of land thereunto belonging, more or less, 
for the term of fifteen years &c, with sufficient firewood &c, and the use of 
the table and form in the hall for the term of fifteen years, and after that 
to John my son and his heirs forever. To James my son twenty pounds 
when he shall accomplish the age of eighteen years. Wife Elizabeth to be 
executrix and John Hall, John Gould and William Cocke overseers. 

X 

Wit: John Hall, Jjohn Gvlde, Will'" Cocke 

Hitchin Reg. &c. Vol. 4, fol. 260. 

Ellyn Axtkll of Bovington 15 March 1602, proved 1 October 1603. 
To be buried near late husband Thomas Saunders. To my son Matthew 
Eaton. Thomas Hayes the son of Thomas Hayes. Nathaniel Hayes, 
another son of Thomas, and Abiezer Hayes, another. Thomas Goulde the 

* This volume contains original wills and other probate papers bound together in a book. 

H. F. Watehs. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1019 

son of Thomas Goulde. My daughter Isabel Hayes, wife of Thomas 
Hayes, to be sole executor ami Mr. John Hall and Thomas Goulde to be 
overseers. llitchin Reg. &c. Vol. 4, fol. 298. 

Thomas Gould of Bovington, Herts, yeoman, his deed of gift to his 
son John Gould of all his goods &c., dated 26 February 31 Elizabeth. 
Among the witnesses were John Goold the elder and William Gould. 

Hitchin Reg. &c. Vol. 4, fol. 423. 

John Gould of the lane in Bovingdon, 21 January 1610, proved (month 
and day not given) 1610. My daughter Mary and her sons Frances and 
John Lovatt. To William Hatch, sou of William Hatch. My daughter 
Priscilla. My son Thomas to be executor and my sons in law Francis 
Lovatt and William Hatch overseers. John Gould one of the witnesses. 

Hitchin Reg. &c. Vol. 5 ( 1609-1623) fol. 12. 

Nathan Gould of Tring, Herts, chandler, 18 February 1611, proved 
7 March 1611. To my mother and my brother Jeremie the rent of my 
house, being four pounds a year, or thereabouts, to be equally divided be- 
tween " they " two, this house being within the manor of Hempsted, for the 
term of eight years &c, and after that to Jeremie and his heirs forever. 
My brother Jeremie shall pay unto my sister Rebecca Ware forty shillings 
at the Michaelmas after my decease. Her two daughters, Sara Ware and 
Priscilla Ware, at eighteen. My sister Priscilla and her two children, 
John Grover and Priscilla Grover, at eighteen. I give unto my brother 
Symon Gould six pounds, to be paid him two years next after my decease. 
To my brother Stephen Gould six pounds in four years. To my brother 
Thomas Gould six pounds in five years. To my brother James Gould six 
pounds in seven years. To the poor of Tring ten shillings and the poor of 
Bovingdon ten shillinjis. To Francis Clarke of Willstorne five shillings. 
The residue to my brother Jerymie Gould whom I appoint executor; and 
I do appoint overseers Thomas Gould of " Nuhall " and my cousin Jeremie 
Gould; and for their kindness I give them two shillings. 

Elizabeth Gould (by mark) one of the witnesses. 

Hitchin Reg. &c. Vol. 5, fol. 55. 

Licentia Matr. 
Vicesimo septimo die mensis Julij Anno dni 1030° apud Whethampsted p 
magrm Jacohu Barker Clicil surrogatu etc., p T ?ite me Gui'l: Rolfe no™ 
pub' ., Concessa fxdi licentia p celebracone mronii in ecciia po/« de Langley 
Regis seu capo, de fflaunden inter Symone Gould de Bovingdon viduu et 
Judithd Gould de Langley Regis vidua. 

Archd. of Huntingdon, Acta 1638, 1639. 

Judith Gould of Watford, widow, 6 May 1650, proved 3 September 
1650. To my son Abel four hundred pounds and a little box at my cousin 
Gase her house in Hemsteed and all that is in it. To my daughter Lydia 
three hundred pounds. To daughter Elizabeth three hundred pounds. To 
my daughter Hannah, to her two daughters, Hannah and Elizabeth by 
name, I give them forty pounds betwixt them. My son in law George 
Younge bv bond oweth me one hundred' pounds. Out of this I will to mv 
son Nathan in New England, to his own children, forty pounds aud to my 
daughter Sarah her children threescore pounds, if so be my sou Nathan 



1020 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

hath not divided the goods that my sou Zacheus left him when he died 
equally betwixt them, him and his Sister Sarah : but if they are equally 
divided then this hundred pouuds to be equally divided betwixt them both 
for the use of their children. This to be given them a year after my de- 
cease. And if my son Abell he dieth before he cometh of age it is my will 
that three hundred pouuds be equally divided betwixt my "two daughters 
Lydia and Elizabeth. And of the other hundred pouuds I will fifty pounds 
to my daughter Hannah, twenty pounds to daughter Mary and the other 
thirty pounds to be sent to New England for my son Nathan and my daugh- 
ter Sarah their own children, to be equally divided betwixt them both. 
And if the money that I have lent to Parliament should be paid in then 
I will one hundred pounds to my son Abel and forty pounds to my daugh- 
ter Mary, and what other money ariseth from the Parliament I will it 
should be equally divided betwixt my three daughters Hannah, Lydia and 
Elizabeth. For the Minister of Watford, by name Master Goodwinge, I 
will five pounds and to the poor of Watford five pounds. The residue to 
son Abel and daughters Lydia and Elizabeth and I make them executor 
and executrixes. 

Ralph Kinge one of the witnesses. 

Abel Gould united with his two sisters in taking the oath of probate. 

Pembroke, 145. 

[In addition to the foregoing, I have note of a grant of probate of the will 
of Thomas Gould, Senr. of Bovingdon, made 27 January 1637 ; but the will 
itself I have not seen. The grant is entered in Act Book No. 5, fol. 27, of 
Archd. of Huntingdon (Hunts and Herts Wills &c.) Hitchin Registry. In 
these Act Books I have found many scattered entries of Marriage Licenses 
in which I saw a number of names that would appear familiar to New England 
genealogists. One of them, relating to this Gould family, I have extracted. 

H. F. Waters. 

The following Gould items may be of interest : 

From Parish Registers, Aston Abbotts, Bucks. : " 12 July, 1631, Henry, son of 
Jeremy and Priscilla Gould, bapt." The only Gould entry from 1578-1660. 

From Parish Register, Tring, Herts. : " Buried, 22 May, 1600, Anne Goold." 

Bovingdon is about 10 miles south-east of Tring, and six miles east of Ches- 
ham. 

Lay subsidy 4 Chas. I. (1628) for Bucks. Under Great Missenden; Zacheus 
Gould, John Putnam (not the ancestor of the Danvers family). 

I do not now remember if I looked especially for Gould while searching 
Tring registers. I was somewhat hurried. I found the burial of one Annis 
Home there, 7 June, 1598, and such names as Putnam, Weston, Hitchcock, Gates, 
Edmonds, Emerton, Trott, Plummer, Haddock, were common. 

Eben Putnam, of Salem. 

Benjamin Apthorp Gould, LL.D., of Cambridge, who for many years has been 
collecting information about the Gould family, and has just issued a book 
entitled "The Family of Zaccheus Gould of Topsfield," furnishes us with the 
following notes on these Gould wills : 

"William Golde of Bovingdon, the testator of the first Gould will in this 
group, is the one on page 10 of my book (there numbered 12), and Mr. Waters's 
record gives him two daughters, 'Elnere' and Joan, whom I did not find in 
the will. Perhaps they were daughters-in-law. 

" Widow Joan Wells, once Axtell, whose will follows, I conjecture to be my 
No. 13, sister of the William above mentioned. 

" ' John Gould of Merchants ' was my No. 44, executor of estate of his father 
Thomas. His first wife was named Alice. 

" John Gould of the Lane has given me much bother for many years in the 
attempt to identify him with certainty. A personal visit to Bovingdon did no 
good. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1021 

■ Nathan Gould of Tring was 'the eldest son of John of Merchants,' and 
died a.p. 

■■ Judith of Watford (to which town she removed after the death of her hus- 
band) was widow of John of King's Langley, who was a brother of my ancestor 
Xaccheiis. and of Jeremy of Rhode Island. Her son Nathan was he who settled 
in Amesbnry [Salisbury] in 1652, and was a citizen of A. in 1057. His descend- 
ants are scattered all over New Hampshire and Vermont. Administration on 
the estate of her son Zaccheus, resident in New England, was granted to his 
sister Elizabeth, 1650, Sept. 12, after the death of their mother Judith; but, as 
the mother knew of his death when making her will May 6, 1G50, he had probably 
been then dead for some time. 

'• Internal evidence in Judith Gould's will has long led me to suppose that 
George Young was the husband of Sarah, who was in New England with her 
children; but I have not ventured to assume it with any certainty. The only 
George Young mentioned by Savage was of Scituate, 1660, and does not appear 
to have been the man. 

" If any one has any knowledge of Sarah's husband, I should be grateful to 
receive it. 

" Of the Thomas Gould, senior, of Bovingdon, mentioned in Mr. Waters's 
note, I have no knowledge." 

Margaret Gooding of Okelv magna in the Co. of Essex, widow, 23 
Sept. 1623, proved at Colchester 22 October 1623. My body I will to be 
buried in decent manner in the churchyard of Okely magna. I give to the 
poor of Okely of mine own gift ten shillings, and whereas there remains due 
to them forty shillings of that legacy which my late loving husband Daniel 
Gooding deceased gave them I will the same forty shillings and ten shillings 
to be paid to them within six months after my decease by mine executor. I 
give my tenement lying in the market of Okely aforesaid and now in the tenure 
or occupation of the widow Bets & Richard Sadler the elder, so much of it 
as they or their assigns have in their occupation, to my daughter Mary 
Stevens and to her heirs forever. I give all and singular my other lands and 
tenements with the appurtenances thereto belonging, set, lying and being in 
the market of Okely magna, and now in the occupation of Christopher Wilson 
or his assigns, to my grandchild Edward Stone and to his heirs forever, upon 
condition that he the said Edward, or his guardian, shall yearly and every 
year after the nine and twentieth day of September which shall be in 
the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and four and twentieth 
pay or cause to be paid unto my well beloved in Christ, Michaiah Wood, 
parson of Okely aforesaid &c. at or in the parsonage house of Okely the 
full sum of six pounds of lawful English money in or upon the two usual 
feasts of the year, i. e. of the annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary and 
of St. Michael the Archangel, by even and equal portions, which yearly pay- 
ment shall continue until the money so paid amount unto the sum of three 
score and nine pounds. And all the said sum or sums of money to be and re- 
main in the custody and imployment of the said Michaiah Wood until the 
three children of my daughter Jone Stone, Richard and Mary Stone and that 
child which my said daughter Jone now beareth in her wombe shall accom- 
plish their several ages of one and twenty years, and that he shall then pay 
unto the said children one and twenty pounds thirteen shillings four pence 
apiece; and the residue of the said sum, that is to say the sum of four 
pounds, I give to Michaiah Wood aforesaid desiring him to accept of it as 
a testimony of my good will towards him. 

I give to the said Edward Stone my best cupboard, my best bed and bed- 
stead, a pair of new blankets, one pair of Holland sheets, one pair of coarse 
sheets, three diaper napkins, one coarse table cloth, three pewter platters, 
my best brass pot, one tipped jug. I give to my daughter Jone Stone two 



1022 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

pair of fine hollaud sheets, two pair of new coarse sheets, six diaper nap- 
kins, two pair fine pillowbeeres, one diaper table cloth, one coarse table 
cloth, two coarse towels, six pewter platters, three of them being of the 
bigger sort and three of the lesser. I give to my daughter Mary Stevens one 
pair of Holland sheets, two pairs of coarse sheets, two pairs of Holland 
pillowbeeres, a diaper table cloth, six diaper table napkins, one coarse table 
cloth, two coarse towels, six pewter platters, three of them being of the 
bigger sort and three of the lesser. I give to my grandchild Mary Stone 
one pair of coarse sheets, one pair of fine sheets, three diaper napkins, 
one coarse tablecloth, three pewter platters, one brass pot, one tipped jug. 
I give to Ellen Gooding wife to my son Daniel Gooding my best gown, my 
best cloak, my least apron, a pair of pillowbeeres, a pair of sheets, two 
table cloths, three table napkins, four pewter platters. I give to my grand- 
child Richard Gooding that bed which I now lie on, furnished every way 
saving with pillows. I give to my grandchild Daniel Gooding ten shillings. 
I give to my grandchild John Gooding ten shillings, both which sums of ten 
shillings I will to be paid to the guardian or guardians of the said Daniel 
and John within one year after my decease. I give to my grandchild Mar- 
garet Bridge two old hutches, two pairs of coarse sheets, my middle brass 
pot, four pewter platters of the smaller sort. I give to my son Daniel 
Gooding a winding sheet of " Lockerum." I give to my son William 
Gooding one pair of sheets and one pillowbeere. I give to Elizabeth Lin my 
servant two pairs of sheets, my blue petticoat, my red waistcoat, my green 
apron, one white apron, two pewter platters of the smaller sort; and my 
executor shall pay to the said Elizabeth Lin the five pounds given her by 
the last will of my husband Daniel Gooding. I give to Margaret Freeman, 
widow, one pair of sheets, two pewter platters of the smaller sort, one pewter 
salt-cellar. All my goods unbequeathed, my debts being paid, my legacies 
and funerals performed, I give fo mine executor. I make, appoint and 
ordain my son in law Richard Stone of Weeks executor. 

Wit: William Linn, William Rolff, John Knighte & Robert Cole. 

Robert Middleton 3 April 1627. To my loving brother William 
Middlton of Hamton in Yorkshire all goods, moveables and chattells which 
are or shall be due to me, to say, one trunk wherein is certain goods and 
money, one suit of apparel, a cloak, a girdle, a pair of gloves, with a Pettras 
rug and a Venis looking glass of ebony, likewise five pounds of la.wful 
money the which is in the hands of Edward Lane, pulley maker dwelling 
in Shadwell, with all such things as are formerly mentioned, also a debt of 
seven pounds due from Alexander Normaus of St. Katherine's, cooper. 
Likewise I give my brother all such goods or apparel aud debts as are 
or shall be due to me in the plantation whereof is master Peter Andrews. 
I appoint my loving friends Thomas Babb and Richard Lowther my true 
and lawful overseers to the use of the said William Middelton. 

Commission issued 18 July 1627 to Thomas Babb one of the supervisors 
named in the will of the said Robert Middlton lately within the kingdom 
of Virginia, bachelor, deceased, during the absence of William Middelton the 
brother, for the reason that he had named no executor in the said will. 

Skynner, 78. 

Honer Rockwell of Dorchester, Dorset, widow, 19 July 1637, proved 
26 January 1637. To six of my grandchildren, the sons and daughters of 
my sou Richard Rockwell deceased, Thomas, Joseph, Nathaniel, Samuel, 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1023 

Deoerath and Mary, twenty shilling apiece, to be paid unto them and either 
ot them when they shall come to the age of one and twenty years &c. To 
my sou Roger Rockwell's children teu shillings apiece when they shall come 
to the age of one and twenty years. I give to all my grandchildren in New 
England, both sous and daughters, Richard Rockwell, William Rockwell 
and John Rockwell, twelve pence apiece, to be paid at the age of one and 
twenty years. I give uuto my daughter Jane Farthinge all my wearing 
apparell, except my best whittle which I give to Abigail Rockwell daughter 
of my son Roger Rockwell. The rest to my son Roger whom I make sole 
executor. 

Wit: Henry Bridges and Thomas Poole. Lee, 7. 

Maurice Thomson of Haversham Bucks Esq. 23 March 1674, proved 
9 May 1676. To be buried in Haversham chancel, by my dear wife. To 
one hundred poor silenced ministers twenty shillings apiece. To Arthur, 
Helena and Elizabeth Thomson, the three children of my dear son Sir 
John Thomson Baronet, one hundred pounds apiece, at one and twenty. 
Bequests to children of eldest daughter the Lady Katherine Witwrong, late 
wife of Sir Johu Witwrong, Knight and Baronet, viz 1 . Katherine, Anne 
and Helena Witwrong. My two hopeful grandchildren William and Sam- 
uel Oldfield at one and twenty. My dear brothers George, Sir William and 
Robert Thomson, trustees for my daughter Martha Corsellis. Nicholas 
Corsellis, her son, at six and twenty. My fourth daughter Elizabeth Alston 
wife of Joseph Alston Esq., and her three hopeful sons, Joseph, Edward 
and Maurice Alston. To my said dearly beloved son Sir John Thomson, 
Baronet, all my freehold manors, lands, tenements and hereditaments in 
England, Ireland, Barbados, Antego, St. Christophers, Virginia, the Carebee 
Islands and elsewhere (with provisions per entail). Certain estates in 
London excepted. A jointure for the Lady Frances, wife of Sir John 
Thomson. Bence, 57. 

George Thomson of St. James Clerkenwell, Middlesex, Esq., 15 
December 1690, proved 17 January 1690. To wife Abigail one hundred 
pounds a year clear. My manor and parsonage of Bricklinsey Essex. My 
grandson John South. My grandson George South. My niece Mrs. Mary 
Owen. My grandson Richard South. My cousin George Thomson, son of 
my nephew Sir John Thomson, Baronet. George Thomson, son of my 
nephew Sir Samuel Thomson, knight. My nephew Joseph Thomson, son 
of ray dear brother Robert Thomson Esq. To my wife my Japan chest 
a Japan cabinet and an Indian cabinet armed with silver. My grand 
daughter Elizabeth South. My cousin Ambler, daughter of my cousin 
Brookhaven. My daughter in law Hannah Cooper. My sou in law Mr. 
John Tuffhell. My brother in law M r . Edward Keightley. My sou in 
law M r . John Lockey. The poor of Wormeley Herts and of Whatton 
Herts. My body to be buried in Olave's church Southwark, near my late 
wife. Vere, 15. 

[For notes on this family of Thomson see ante, pp. 65-67 and 73-75. Let me 
take this opportunity to correct two printer's errors on p. 67. In the small pedi- 
gree, given there, for "Stokes" read Stukes. And in foot-note, for " Eades " 
read Eedes. H. F. W.] 

Thomas Middleton of London Esq. 5 December, 1672, proved 16 
December 1672. I charge all my lands and estates in England with the 



1024 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

payment of my just debts and legacies, ami if they fall short my lands &c. 
in Barbados, New England and '• Antego," or elsewhere in parts beyond 
the seas. To my wife Elizabeth one hundred and fifty pounds per annum, 
chargeable on my plantations &c. and payable at the now dwelling house 
of John West, scrivener in Walbrooke, London, half yearly &c. Provision 
in case wife be with child. To my dear sister Rebecca Wilkins twelve 
pounds per annum during the term of her natural life (chargeable and pay- 
able as before). To my son Benjamin Middleton all my plantations called 
Mount Plantation and Valley Plantation in Barbados and all other my lands 
and plantations in New England, Antego and elsewhere, with houses, sugar 
works, mills, servants, negroes &c. &c, chargeable with said annuities &c. 
To wife my coach and horses &c. Reference to accounts with Capt. Henry 
Colleton deceased. To Ursula, one of the daughters of the said Henry 
Colleton, now intermarried with William Gold, linen draper, five hundred 
pounds. To her sister Arrabella, now wife of Samuel Pett, the like sum. 
To my niece Elizabeth Wilkins ten pounds. To Mrs Cordell ten pounds. 
To the poor of Trinity House fifty pounds. My lands &c. in Kent to son 
Benjamin. The children of my daughter Elizabeth Freere wife of Toby 
Freere. My friends M r . John Duckworth, Major Nehemiah Bourne and 
Mr. Nicholas Dawes. Eure, 152. 

Philip Middleton of St. Olave, Southwark, Surrey, waterman, 11 
December 1650, proved 23 December 1650. To my daughter Hellen 
Harris, wife of Richard Harris dwelling in Barbados, three pounds, to be 
laid out in apparell and sent to her. To my daughter Hannah Pomfast, 
wife to Edward Pomfast dwelling in New England, five pounds and to 
her children three pounds, to be laid out in clothes and sent to the said 
Hannah and her children. To my daughter Elizabeth Strowd dwelling 
in the Summer Islands three pounds and to her children ten shillings 
apiece, to be laid out in clothes &c. To my grandson Joseph Kettle four 
pounds and to his children ten shillings apiece. To my grand daughter 
Hannah Kettle forty shillings. To my grandson George Kettle the 
younger five pounds, to be paid for his use to his father George Kettle. 
To my grandchild Philip Seale ten pounds. To my grandchild Mary Seale 
five pounds (and other things). To my grandchild Richard Seale five 
pounds. To my grandchild Margaret Seale three pounds. To my grand- 
child John Seale three pounds. (Philip, Richard and John at one and 
twenty and Margaret at like age or day of marriage.) The residue to my 
daughter Mary Seale, wife of George Seale, waterman, whom I make sole 
executrix. Pembroke, 204. 

William Tyce, 15 July 1649, proved 24 August 1649. To my eldest 
sister Mary Tice one hundred pounds. To my sister Anne Tice living in 
New England or elsewhere, or to her posterity fifty pounds. To the children 
of Thomas King, being in number eight, forty shillings. Unto a girl born 
since named Susan Horder twenty shillings. To the poor of the parish of 
Motcum (Motcombe, Dorset) five pounds. To Mr. Drant, minister thereof, 
fifty shillings, if dead to his successor. My mother's kindred, if any living. 
My cousin William Mojar. My brother in law's two sons, Walter Tice the 
eldest, Peter Tice the youngest. My friends at Umbra. My cousin John 
Crouch. Others (some residing in India.). I the said William Tice was 
born at Motcome in Dorset. Fairfax, 127. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1025 

Sib George Carteret, knight ami baronet, vice chamberlain of His 
Maj. Household and one of II. M. Privy Council, 5 December 1G78, proved 
(with a schedule of debts &c.) 14 February 1679. My wife Dame Eliza- 
beth Carteret to be sole executrix. The poor of Ilawnes in Bedfordshire, 
Wingfield, Berks., and of several parishes in Isle of Jersey. The church of 
St. Paul in the towu of Bedford. The poor of the said town. Have con- 
tracted several debts amounting in the whole to ten thousand pounds. 
Trustees appointed, viz*, the Right Hon. Edward, Earl of Sandwich, the 
Right Hon. John, Earl of Bath, the Hon. Sir Thomas Crew, kn 4 ., son and 
heir apparent of the Right Hon. the Lord Crew, my brother in law Sir 
Robert Atkins, kn*. of the B;ith and one of the Justices of the Com. Pleas, 
and his brother Edward Atkins of Lincoln's Inn, Middlesex, Esq. My 
lands in Ireland. My outrents in the Isle of Jersey consisting in wheat and 
other grain. My Plantation of New Jersey. The Island of Alderney. 
My grandson George Carteret at one and twenty years of age. My son 
Capt. James Carteret. Philip Carterett my grandson, second son of my 
son Sir Philip Carteret deceased, to have the mauor or Lordship of Langton 
juxta Horncastle, Lincoln. To my grandson Edward Carterett, youngest 
sou of my said sou Sir Philip Carteret deceased, the manor and lands of 
Wyberton, Lincoln. To my wife my moiety of the manor of Plympton 
Devon., the capital messuage of Saltram &c. &c. for her life and next to my 
grandson George Carteret. To wife one third part of manors, lands &c. in 
the Isle of Jersey for life, then to my said grandson George Carteret. A 
similar disposition of my manor house of Ilawnes, Beds., and other estates 
there. The Rectory of Plympton St. Mary, Devon, charged with an an- 
nuity of twenty five pounds per aunum to my servant Alexander Westlake. 

Bath, 17. 

[Sir George Carteret, bart., the testator, was one of the Lords Proprietors of 
New Jersey. Sketches of his life are printed in Whitehead's " East Jersey 
under the Proprietary Governments," Newark, 1871, pp. 104-5, and in Burke's 
Extinct Baronetage, ed. 1844, p. 104. — Editor]. 



Edward Pickeringe, 1 July 1623, proved 26 August 1623. To my 
loving and dear wife Mary Pickeringe eight hundred pounds. To my dear 
and tender father John Pickeringe one hundred and fifty pounds, to be kept 
in the hands of my executors &c. and disposed of for his benefit. I give unto 
my dear child John Pickeringe, my first born son, three hundred pounds. 
Similar bequests to daughters Sinseare and Mary Pickeringe. To Francis 
Stubb mv brother in law fifty pounds. 

"Item. I giue unto that hopefull worke begunn in Newe England, to be 
ymployed and layed out for the beuefitt and helpinge ouer those Englishe 
people whoe dwell in Laydon thether with the first fiftie poundes." To 
Randall Thick ins, my loving friend, ten pounds. To certain friends here 
in London ten pounds (if the accounts prove overplus). The residue to be 
divided equally into five equal portions to be distributed between my wife, 
ray father and my three children. 1 appoint my friends Mr. James Sheiley 
and Mr. Richard Androwes for executors and my good friend and brother 
Mr. Thomas White and Mr. John Stubbe for overseers. Swann, 86. 

[The above recalls another of Mr. Waters's Gleanings, which contained three 
well-known Salem names, viz.: " Thomas Gardener, citizen and grocer of Lon- 
don: 23 Aug. Iu90, proved 24 Oct. 1590; wife Katherine, coseu John Gardener, 



1026 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

sons Thomas, Christopher and Jeremy, eosens Richard Grafton, Henry Picker- 
ing and others. Drury L. 69."* 

The name of Pickering is found flourishing in London at least one hundred 
years before the emigration to New England ; also at that period and still later. 
The name frequently appears in the parish registers of London, printed by the 
Harleian Society, and the Visitation of London gives a brief pedigree of one 
branch of the family. 

There were two John Pickerings here in New England who founded families, 
viz. : John Pickering of Portsmouth who is said to have settled there in 1633, and 
John Pickering of Salem, of which place he was admitted an inhabitant " 7 of 
12 mo. 1636." John Pickering of Salem was a carpenter and was born in 1615 
and died in 1G57. We do not rind the date of birth of John Pickering of Ports- 
mouth, but we infer that it occurred not far from the time of his contemporary. 
In the middle and southern states we find that the name existed at a somewhat 
later date. There was a Charles Pickering who was a merchant of Philadelphia 
in 1689, and there were persons of the name in Charleston, South Carolina, in 
the early part of the last century.f There was also a family of Pickerings 
settled in the parish of St. Lucy, Barbados, sometime before A. D. 1700. A 
representative of this family, the Rev. Joseph Pickering of Wickham, Hampshire, 
England, corresponded with Col. Timothy Pickering on the subject of the family 
history and claimed kinship when he found that the Salem family and his own 
used the same coat-of-arms- 

The above will of Edward Pickeringe, of course, is only suggestive. From it, 
it appears that in 1623 his son John Pickeringe w r as a child and probably was 
born not far from 1615, the date of birth of John Pickering of Salem in New 
England. Harrison Ellery.] 



John Marsh of Branktry, Essex, clothier, 15 April 1627, proved 29 
May 1627. To the poor of this parish three pounds. To Samuel Collyn, 
minister &c, fifty shillings. To William Waslin, which was my late servant 
and kinsman, forty shillings and to Joseph Waslyn, his father, one suite of 
apparel, viz. one dublet, one pair of breeches, one pair of stockings and 
one hat. To Francis Waslin, my sister, now the wife of Joseph Waslyn, 
twenty shillings a year for life. To my servant Jeremy Mannyng ten shil- 
lings. To Richard, Mary, and Thomasin Outiug, one of the sons and two 
daughters of Richard Outing my brother in law. twenty shillings apiece. 
To every one of my daughters, Sarah, Mary, Grace and Lydia, one hundred 
pounds apiece at their several ages of nineteen years. To Grace my wife all 
such lands, houses and buildings which herein I do give to Joseph Marsh my 
son, until he come to his age of one and twenty years, for and towards the 
bringing up of my children. To my said son Joseph the messuage or tene- 
ment with the two orchards &c. in Branktrey, now or late in the occupation of 
Thomas Hudson, and all those copyhold lands, fields or closes in the said parish 
now or late in the occupation of Richard Bedwell, and the three fields or closes 
commonly called the broomfields, in said parish, now or late in my own 
occupation, when he shall come to his age of one and twenty years. All the 
rest of my messuages, lands &c. my wife shall have and enjoy until my son 
John Marsh shall come to his age &c, for and towards the bringing up of 
all my children, and then I wholly give them to the said John Marsh. To 
Sarah Bawldwin, widow, ten shillings. To my son Samuel Marsh four 
hundred pounds, to be paid unto the hands of my good friends Adrian Mott 
and John Marryon, of Branktry, clothiers, upon trust &c. to purchase land 
or houses (to that value) to the use of my wife Grace until Samuel shall 

* " Gleanings from English Records by Emmerton and Waters," Essex Institute Hist. 
Coll., Vol. XVII., p. 40. 

t F<>r ;ui account of these see " The Topographer and Genealogist," Vol. I., pp. 441-153, 
by John Gough Nichols. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1027 

come to his age of one aud twenty and then to my said son. The residue 
of all my goods I give to my wife and children (equally). My said wife 
to be executrix. 

Witnessed by Adrian Mott, William Barnerd, John Maryon, Richard 
Outing, James Sparhawke. Skyuner, 46. 

Grace Marsh of Branctree, Essex, widow, 29 January 1657, proved 
22 May 1667. To my son Joseph Marsh all that my copyhold messuage or 
tenement in Ingateston, Essex, with all the houses &c. and all the lands 
belonging, containing fifty acres, more or less, provided he pay the several 
legacies "mentioned in the will. To my son in law Nathaniel Tyers and 
Grace, now his wife, my daughter, seven pounds yearly during their lives 
and the longer liver of them both, and after that to the heirs of the body 
of the said Grace, lawfully begotten, three score pounds. And for want of 
such heirs of the said Grace the said Joseph shall pay or cause to be paid 
unto so many of the children of my son John Marsh, now in New Eng- 
land, as shall be living at the time of my decease the sum of three 
score pounds at their several ages of one and twenty. And he shall pay 
to my daughter Lidia, the wife of William Martin, seven pounds yearly, for 
her life, and after that to so many of her children as shall be living at the 
time of my decease the sum of three score pounds (at their ages &c). And 
my son Joseph shall keep my brother William Baldwin, during his natural 
life, at his own proper cost and charges or else pay uuto him yearly the sum 
of six pounds, during his life. And after the decease of the said William 
Baldwin, my brother, the said Joseph shall pay unto my grandchild John 
Marsh, the sou of my said son John, thirty pounds, when he shall attain 
unto the age of one and twenty years, and shall likewise pay to my grand- 
child William Martin, the son of my son in law William Martin and Lidia 
my daughter, thirty pounds (when of age), and shall pay to the said John 
Marsh my son thirty pounds. To Joseph all my freehold meadow or parcel 
of land in Branctree containing two acres, more or less, with remainder to 
to my son John &c. Certain household goods to son John. To grandchild 
Grace Marsh, the daughter of son John, a stitched white cupboard cloth 
and a green Kersey cupboard cloth. To Samuel, son of my son John, a 
feather bed and bolster that my son Joseph lieth on. To Grace my daugh- 
ter a pair of Virginalls (and certain household stuff) during her life, aud 
after her decease, if not leaving issue, to the children of my daughter Lidia. 
Certain household stuff to daughter Lidia &c. To John Sharp my grandchild 
ten pounds, to be paid in three years. To Mr. Algar, now minister of Branc- 
tree, twenty shillings, and 1 desire him to preach at my funeral. To the poor 
of Branctree forty shillings. Son Joseph to be executor. 

Wit: Adrian Mott, John Maryau, Edward Tabor. 

Com. of London (Essex aud Herts). Fish, 54. 

Ralph Croft of Leeds Mainridiug in the Co. of York, gentleman, 21 
December 1655, proved 31 October 1656. My body to be buried in the 
parish church of Leeds. To Christopher Croft my son and heir apparent 
one annuity of twenty pouuds to be yearly issuing forth of all my mes- 
suages, cottages, closes, lands, tenements and hereditaments &c. in Leeds and 
Leeds Mainriding, to hold for his natural life. I give and bequeath unto 
Christopher Nowell of Meadow lane and his heirs all my messuages &c. &c. 
uf intent that he shall stand thereof seized to and for the use of my six 



1028 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

grandchildren Susan Croft, John Preston, Ralph Preston, Susan Preston, 
Mary Preston and Anthony Kuipe &c. (charged with the said annuities &c. ). 
I give to the said Christopher Croft my son fifty pounds. To Anne Syme 
five pounds. To Margaret Nowell ten pounds. To John Roberts five 
pounds. To either of my maid servants twenty shillings apiece. All the 
rest of my goods &c. to the said Susan Croft, John Preston, Ralph Pres- 
ton, Susan Preston. Mary Preston and Anthony Knipe, equally to be divided 
among them. And I give the tuition of my said six grandchildren unto the 
said Christopher Nowell. And I do make him sole executor &c. To 
Grace Moxon my late servant forty shillings. 
Proved by Christopher Nowell at London. 

Berkley, 416. 

Christopher Nowell of Leeds, York, chapman, 13 June 1657, proved 
5 September 1657. My body to be buried in the parish church of Leeds. 
I do hereby give and bequeath all my lands and tenements in New England 
to Rebecca Greathead, daughter of John Greathead of Morley, York. To 
Jane Sunderland my sister, and her son ten pounds. Reference made to 
the will of Ralph Croft late of Leeds, gentleman, deceased, made 21 Decem- 
ber 1655. I give and bequeath unto Margaret my wife the tuitiou of 
the six grandchildren (as named in said will) and the management of the 
estate according to the purport of the said will of M r . Croft. My said wife 
to be executrix and my good friend M r . Edmund Atkinson of Leeds to be 
aiding and assisting her in the well ordering of the children's estate. 

Ruthen, 335. 

William Whitehead of London, gen*., 31 December 1622, proved 25 
March 1623. The poor of St. Mildred in the Poultry, London. To Wil- 
liam Brooke and Eaekias Woodward, my schoolmasters, dwelling in Lou- 
don, ten pounds apiece. The Worshipful Matthew Lester, Doctor of 
Phisick. My friend Nathan Walworth. Mr. Daniel Darnelly of London, 
apothecary. Edward Williams of Haughton Lodge in the Co. of Bedford, 
yeoman. Evan Jenkin, James Knight (a Frenchman by birth) Richard 
Phillips (Mr. William Brookes manservant) and Joane Colley. Margaret 
Bosam. Margaret Dare. Richard Shropsheire, servant unto the Right 
Hon. the Earl of Pembrooke, Lord High Chamberlain of England, and 
John Harris servant unto the Right Hon. the Earl of Montgomery. My 
loving aunt Mrs. Clarke, my father's sister, now resident in Ireland (to 
whom twenty pounds). And if my said aunt Clarke shall not be living at 
the time of my decease I do give and bequeath the said sum of twenty pounds 
intended to be given unto her as is aforesaid, unto the Ri<dit Hon. the Vir- 
ginia Company in London for and towards the better maintenance of a school 
in Virginia, already bnilded or to be budded, within three years next after 
my decease, within Martin's Hundred there. And, for want of such school 
I give and bequeath the said twenty pounds towards the building of a church 
or maintenance of the same within the said Hundred of Martens in Vir- 
ginia. I give for such purpose moreover all and eveiy such sum and sums 
of money whatsoever &c. as to me are or shall be in any wise due, owing or 
payable out of or by the estates and rights of Thomas VVhitehead, my father 
late deceased, or Rohert Whitehead, my uncle late deceased, or either of 
them. The residue to the said Dr. Matthew Lester and Nathan Walworth 
whom I make co-executors &c. 

One of the witnesses was Ezekias Woodward. 

Book 24, Cora, of London, L. 192. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1029 

John Robins of St. Martin's Le Orgar, Loudou, citizen and joiner of 
London, 23 August 1627, proved 1 October 1G27. My sous John and 
Richard Robins. I owe my mother Margaret Robins. My father in law 
William Pitt. A gold seal riug whereon are engraved these words, " The 
gift of Stephen Bunninge." My sister Isabel Robins. To Mr Traske, 
preacher, twenty shillings for a remembrance. The poor of St. Martin's. 
Edward Watton, my now apprentice. Cleophas Baker, another. Wife Anne 
to be sole executrix and loving cousins Johu Dalbie and Richard Woodward 
overseers. If wife die before me I appoint my said loving father in law 
William Pitt, my loving brother in law Thomas Whiting and my loving 
cousin Ezechias Woodward joint executors, to and for the use and behoof 
of my said two children John and Richard. Elizabeth Pitt daughter of my 
brother in law William Pitt. William Balducke, my sister Whiting's son. 
Elizabeth and Anne, the two daughters of my brother in law Anthony 
Stephens. Abigail Walker, wife of Johu Walker. Skynner, 98. 

Richard Tomlins of St. Peter's, Paul's Wharf, London, gentleman, 
19 July 1637, proved 6 September 1637. To be buried in church of 
St. Peter's &c. near late deceased wife Jane. I bequeath the lease of my 
house on St. Peter's Hill to two of my brother William's children, viz'., 
William and Ralph Tomlins, they to pay to their sisters Joane and Margery 
Tomlius ten pounds apiece at day of marriage or within three years after 
my decease. I do bequeath my late wife's wearing apparell and her linen 
to Joane Tomlyns, Margery Tomlins and Joane Wilder the wife of Daniel 
Henshman to be divided amongst them by equal portions. To William and 
John Wilder the sous of Robert Wilder deceased, my late wife's brother, 
ten pounds, viz 1 ., to William three pounds six shillings eight pence and to 
John six pounds thirteen shillings four pence. To Joane Wilder als Hench- 
man (certain bed, bedding &c.) in the chapel chamber. All the other 
moveables &c. equally to William Tomlins, Johu Tomlins (if living), Raph 
Tomlins, Richard Tomlins, James Tomlins, Joane Tomlins and Margery 
Tomlins. To brother Raph forty shillings (for a ring). The same sum to 
Francis Longuille. William and Raph Tomlius to be executors and Robert 
Dugdale, citizen and clothworker of Loudon, to be overseer. 

Certain erasures and interlineations done and made 22 August 1637. 

Goare, 127. 

Hezekiah Woodward of Uxbridge, Middlesex, gen'., 22 February 
1674, proved 10 July 1675. To my most dear and beloved grandchild 
Theodora Oxenbridge I give and bequeath the sum of twenty pounds 
lawful money of England and my silver caudle cup with a porringe 
cover and my gilt cup and also six of the best of my English books, to be 
paid and delivered unto her at her age of sixteen years or day of marriage, 
which shall first happen. To the five childreu of my daughter Sarah* Hench- 
man deceased, by Daniel Henchman of Boston in New Englaud I give and 
bequeath the sum of twenty pounds apiece, to be paid at their respective ages 
of one and twenty years, and sooner in case the said Daniel Henchman, their 
father, do give sufficient security to pay the same &c. All my lands and tene- 
ments in the Kingdom of Ireland I give to the above named Daniel Ilench- 
man, he to bestow it, or the moneys raised thereof amongst his children by my 

* Thus in the original will, though the registered copy gives it Mary. 



1030 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

said (laughter Sarah deceased. To my cousin Aune Heme the mother four of 
my English books and forty shillings. To my son in law Mr John Oxenbridge 
I give Chrysostome aud twenty shillings. To my cousin William Home 
Beza's Bible and twenty shillings. My cousin Richar i Martyn. My cou- 
sin Woodward Abraham of New Windsor. My servant Mary Parsone. 
My friends Mr Thomas Darner, Mrs Katherine Baker the e 1 ler, Mrs Sarah, 
wife of Richard Baker, Mrs Mary Biscoe my landlady, Mr Ri ;hard Biscoe her 
son (and others). My body to be buried near the body of my wife at Eaton 
in Bucks. Mary Parsons to be sole executrix. To my cousin Thomas 
Buckley aud his two sisters twenty shillings apiece. 

Vol. 2 Arch, of Middlesex (1672-1677). 

[Hezekiah Woodward, the testator, was "the schismatical vicar of Bray." 
(See W. D. Cooper's "The Oxenbridges of Brede Place, Sussex and Boston, 
Massachusetts," p. 11.) His daughter Frances -was the second wife of Rev. 
John Oxenbridge, afterwards of Boston. Her only daughter, Theodora, who is 
named in the will, was born July 25, 1659, and married Nov. 21, 1677, Rev. Peter 
Thacher of Milton. (See Cooper's "The Oxenbridges," page 11, and the 
Register, vol. 44, p. 83-8, ante, pp. 418-23.) Cooper calls Frances, who mar- 
ried John Oxenbridge, the "only daughter"; but the testator calls Sarah, 
wife of Daniel Henchman, of Boston, N. E., his daughter. Can it be that she 
was only a step-daughter? For the record of Daniel Henchman, see Savage's 
Gen. Dictionary, vol. 2, page 402. — Editor.] 



Robert Pordage of St. Dunstan's in the East, citizen and haber- 
dasher of London, 31 January 1634, proved 20 July 1642. To be buried 
in the churchyard of the parish church of St. Dunstan's in the East in 
London without pomp or ostentation. To my loving brother Joseph Pord- 
age of Hernehill, Kent, twenty pounds. To and amongst his seven chil- 
dren thirty-five pounds, that is, five pounds apiece. To Robert, son of my 
cousin Nicholas Pordage deceased, five pounds at twenty one &c. To Sara 
Claggett, my wife's sister's daughter, five pounds at one and twenty or dav 
of marriage. To my loving friends Mr Symon Gearinge, Anthony Ward 
and Richard Beomont, to each of them a twenty shillings piece of gold to 
make them rings in remembrance of me. To my loving friends Joshua 
Pordage, Richard Pordage and Isaac Gover, to each of them likewise a 
twenty shillings piece of gold, to make them rings also in remembrance of 
me. The residue I do wholly give and bequeath unto Hester my loving 
wife whom I do ordain and make my full and sole executrix. 

Cambell, 91. 

[This will I have saved because of its reference to a Joshua Pordage, that 
being the name of the father of our George Pordage (or Portage) of Boston, 
Mass. (Sec Register for July 1894, pp. 383-4, ante, pp. 891-2.)" 

H. F. Waters.] 

John Conuers (place not stated) 2 November 1653, proved 1 May 
1654. Wife Susannah Conuers to be executrix. To my daughter Lucy 
Conuers, the daughter of my late wife Lucy, deceased, the money that will 
be due to her by the death of her grandmother and also the money that is 
due to her by the death of her brother Thomas, now lying in the hands of 
Mr. Edward Bushell, merchant, also this little ring upon my finger and all 
the plate marked with her own mother's mark and mine. To my son John 
this seal ring upon my finger. To my loving friend Capt. John Fox five 
pounds (for a ring) and he to be my overseer and also my lawful attorney 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1031 

to receive all my debts in Virginia and to dispose of this ray cargo of goods 
in the ship called the Thomas and Anne, amounting to three hundred seventy 
nine pounds fifteen shillings and four pence, and three servants, amounting 
to thirty pounds; which is in all 409 1 . lo 9 . 4 d as you may find by Invoice 
and bvBill of Lading: these goods are upon the Accompt of Mr. William 
Lowfield. Mr. John Cutling and Mr. John Couuers. Also I do allow my 
friend Capt. John Fox to choose another attorney, or more, to help him to 
manage this business and to allow him salary after ten per cent. Provisions 
about. cases of waters, wine &c. My desire is that you will allow ray wife 
for the service of Geroniah what you shall please, for he hath been a very 
chargeable servant to me, and if he should return home again he would 
prove a very hargeable servant to my executrix &c. Therefore I shall 
desire you to dispose of him to Mr. Henry Lee of York River, for he will 
be a fit master for him. Twenty shillings to Mrs Elizabeth Fox (for a 
rim?). To my sister Mary Jordaine eleven shillings piece of gold and to her 
children twelve pence apiece. To my brother William Conuer's children 
twelve pence apiece. To my " Cozen Garman " Anthony Phillips a piece of 
eight to buy him a pair of gloves. To Geromiah Rawlings ray old black suit 
and one pair of gray breeches with fancies, one russet cloth coat in my cabin 
and two old casters, one pair of boots and spurs. I give Judah as much 
cotton out of my chest as will make her a petticoat and also two of my 
fowl sbirts. I give to the Capt. and his two mates and to the three men in 
the cabin and the minister and his wife a case of sack and every one of 
them a pair of Cordivant gloves out of my great chest in the hold, to be 
had at the day of my burial ; and the " seaymen " a case of waters, out of 
my eight, to be " dranke " amongst them on that day. Alchin, 389. 

[The will was proved by Susanna Convers, the executrix named in the will. I 
could not discover to what parish the testator belonged, for the Probate Act 
Books for the years 1G52- 16.34 (inclusive) are missing. The servant " Geroniah " 
was, I suppose, the Geromiah Rawlings afterwards mentioned in the will, and 
whose name (Jeremie Rawlins) appears among the witnesses. 

H. F. Waters.] 

Thomas Cox citizeu and vintner of London, 24 May 1709, with a codi- 
cil added 13 January 1711, proved 14 March 1711. To the two children 
of my late daughter in law Mary Test deceased, late wife of Daniel Test, 
eighty pounds, to be paid into the hands of my son Thomas Cox, towards 
their'bringiug up &c. To my daughter in law Mary Frankling forty nobles 
and to her six children, Thomas, Jacob, Mary, Sarah, Anne and Elizabeth, 
twenty nobles apiece. My daughter in law Sarah Plumstead and her daugh- 
ter Mary Plumstead. My cousin Richard Cooper near Upton, Glocester- 
shire. Mary Edwards of Tredenton near Tewxbury in the same County. 
My cousin Anne Weekes who dwelt in Trinity Lane. My friend Hannah 
Marshall. To the poor of Whitechapel so many pounds as I have or shall 
[have] lived years in the parish, reckoning from the eleventh day of June 
1666, two thirds part of it to be applied towards the putting forth apprentices 
(boys and girls) from the free school of Whitechapel. My friend and 
neighbor Thomas Pittstow of Whitechapel, hatter, having a great family of 
children. My cousin Hannah Print, daughter of Thomas Clark late of 
Cheltenham in the Co. of Gloucester. My friends Samuel Waldenfield of 
Feuchurch Street and John Field of George Yard, Lumbard Street. Mary 
Plumstead, wife of Clement Plumstead of Pescod Street, and Anne White- 
head, wife of George Whitehead. John Everett of Chatteris in the Co. of 



1032 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Cambridge. Others named. My dear and loving wife Aune Cox ah 
Hind. The Vintners Company. To son Thomas Cox in trust for his six 
children, Grace, Thomas, John. Anne, Russell and Mary. Two tenements 
I lately built in the Burying Ground of the people called Quakers, near 
Coverlid fields. Grace the wife of my said son Thomas. 

Item, I give and devise unto my said son Thomas Cox, in trust for his 
six children before named and their heirs &c. forever, eight hundred acres, 
part of my nine hundred and twenty acres of land already taken up in the 
Co. of Philadelphia in the Province of Pennsylvania. To my cousin Mary 
Chandler, now dwelling at Pennsylvania, the other remaining one hundred 
and twenty acres of land in Pennsylvania aud thirty pounds in money. To 
my son John Cox my four hundred acres of laud lying part upon a branch 
of Cooper's Creek in the Co. of Gloucester in the Province of West New 
Jersey in America. My son in law Lassells Metcalfe and my daughter 
Christian his wife to have all my shares which I have in the Pennsylvania 
Land Company and in the first old Pennsylvania Company. I give unto 
my said son in law and Christian his wife, in trust for their two children, 
one hundred pounds which I disbursed towards assisting William Penu to 
compose his matters with Philip Forde. My wife Aune Cox and my 
brother in law John Antrim of Martin's le Grand to be executors and Jacob 
Frankling, Samuel Waldenfield and John Field to be overseers. 

Wit: John Craig, next door to the George in Greek Street, John Saun- 
ders at the George in Greek Street, Matthew Hopkinson, a scrivener in 
Greek Street. Barnes, 46. 

Philip Lee of Binfield, Berks, gentleman, 18 August 1G54, proved 31 
August 1654. To Robert Lee, my son, ten shillings. To my three daugh- 
ters, Sara, Anne and Katherine Lee, all my freehold lands, houses, tene- 
ments &c. in the parish of Blubury, Berks, and also all my goods and chat- 
ties and all my household stuff whatsoever, equally to be divided &c. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my brother in law Robert Harhorne anil 
my brother in law Nathaniel Hathorne twenty shillings apiece and I do 
make the said Robert and Nathaniel my executors. Alchin, 398. 

[Mr. Lee was a brother in law of our Major William Hathorne of Salera aud 
of the wife of Lieut. Richard Davenport (see ante, pp. 43-44). 

H. F. Waters.] 

Robert Johnson of North Luffenham, Rutland, in the Diocese of 
Peterborough, aged and infirm, 2 April 1625, proved 24 November 1625. 
To my son Abraham one hundred pounds and to his wife that now is twenty 
pounds. To four poor women to look to the poor Hospital people four 
pounds per annum. To threescore of my poor scholars twelve pence apiece 
to buy them paper. To buy bibles with the Psalms in metre for poor reli- 
gious men I give ten pounds. To the inhabitants of Crowland towards the 
training up of their poor children in learning I give thirty pounds and my 
Chronicle of Ingulfus. Other bequests of a similar nature. To my cousin 
Nathaniel Lacye, Clement Tookye and to their wives ten shillings apiece. 
To each of my brothers children five marks. To young Seaton now at 
Cambridge, a student there, twenty shillings. Others named. To Mrs. 
Tookye a piece of gold of twenty and two shillings. To my cousin Lor- 
rington and his wife, each two and tweuty shillings. My two Hospitals. 
My head masters and the ushers. To each of my grandchildren which my 
son Abraham Johnson hath by his now wife (namely Samuel, Ezechiel, 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1033 

Daniel, Elizabeths James, Nathaniel and Francis), to each one of these (as 
my father did to me) I give twenty pounds apiece. (Certain live stock & 
household goods to them.) Provision for helping live students each in 
Sydney College, St. John's, Emanuel and Clare Hall. Provision against 
any trouble on the part of sou Abraham or his now wife or the said seven 
children. Laud and tenements in Glenfield, Leicestershire, to be sold. 
My loving brother Doctor Chatterton of Cambridge and my son Abraham 
to be overseers and my loving grandchild Isaac Johnson and my trusty and 
well beloved friend John Butler of Okeham, gen 1 , to be executors. 

In a Codicil dated 16 June 1625 he calls himself Clerk. Another was 
added 10 July 1625, and again another 14 July 1625, in which he names 
the now wife of his son Abraham and mother of the seven children already 
named, calling her Elizabeth. 

Commission issued 24 November 1648 to Samuel Johnson, a grandson 
(nepoti). to administer, the executors being dead. Another commission 
issued 23 June 1662 to Ezechiel Johnson, a grandson (nepoli ex filio), to 
administer &c. Clarke, 131. 

[Archdeacon Robert Johuson, the testator, was the founder of Oakham and 
Uppingham schools. The grandchild, Isaac Johnson, named in the will, who is 
made one of the executors, „was an Assistant under the Massachusetts Colony 
Charter. He came to New England in 1030 in the Arbella, named in honor of 
his wife Arbella, daughter of the third Earl of Lincoln. Lady Arbella died 
soon after her arrival in New England, and her husband died not long after, 
Sept. 30, 1630. Extracts from a paper by Isaac's father, Abraham Johnson, of 
Cambridge, Eug., late of South Luffenham, giving details of family history, are 
printed In the Register, vol. 8, pp. 359-62." A tabular pedigree will be found 
in the same volume, page 358; and also in the Harleian Society's publica- 
tions, vol. 3, "The Visitation of the County of Rutland," page 14. By this 
visitation it appears that our Isaac Johnson was "Eet. 18, a° 1618," conse- 
quently he was born about 1600 and was about thirty years old when he died. 
His will is printed in full in the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, vol. 28, pp. 244-46.— Editor.] 

Sir John Tyndall (also Tendall) of Hoccolde in Norfolk knight 16 
May 1538, proved 8 November 1539. My body to be buried in the Chan- 
cel of Hoccolde, by my first wife, whose soul God pardon. I will that my 
wife have all her apparell and Jewells for her body the which at this pres- 
ent time rest in her possession or that at any time afore she had during the 
time of the espousals between her and me. Other legacies to her. 1 will 
that my wife and all those mine heirs, and straitly in the name of God 
charge them, that for such lands as I have enclosed three tofts that they pay 
yearly unto the churches of Hoccolde and Wilton seven shillings; and if 
they fail thus to do I charge my son Thomas the elder, of my blessing, and 
all mine executor* that they throw down the fences and dikes and to suffer 
the tenants to enjoy their common in the said meadow as they have done in 
times past. Ami also by this my last will " I woll that y f myn heires be 
so negligent y* they woll not pave the seyd mony that then y* shalbe 
lefull for the tenfits and the inhabytantes of the sayd Towneships of Hoc- 
colde and Wyltou to throwe downe the saide fenses, And thus by my hist 
will I giue them full Auctoritie so to do." Similar instructions as to land 
inclosed before the gate. My son Thomas the elder to see his son brought 
up till he may shift for himself. Four Treutalls to be sung for my father, 
my mother, for my wife and for me in as hasty a manner as can be devised. 
Bequests to daughters Anne Tendall. Mary Tendall and Beatrix, to the 
daughters of Thomas Baron, the children of Thomas Jaxon &c. My 



1034 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

executors to be my wife, Thomas Tendall the elder, Humfrey Tendall the 
younger, my daughter Anne and my daughter Mary. 

Thomas Tyndall the younger one of the witnesses. Dyngeley, 33. 

Sir Thomas Tyndale, knight, 20 September 25 th Elizabeth, proved 
18 April 1584. Daughters Susann and Ursula Tyndale. Son William 
Tyndale the younger. Son Francis Tyndale. Manors Wilton Poinges 
and Hockwold. Son Henry Tyndale. Son Humfrey Tyndale, Doctor of 
Divinity. Butts, 37. 

Dohothy Stafford of New Romney, late the wife of Henry Stafford 
of New Romney, Kent, clerk, 21 June 6 th James (I), proved 25 October 
1 608. My body to be buried in the church of New Romney, beside Mr. 
Stafford, in the chancel there. To Nicholas Parkhurst who hath married 
the daughter and heir of my said late husband. Peregrin Merricke my 
nephew. Stafford Parkhurst, sou of the said Judith Parkhurst. My man 
Peter Hollowaye, Anne Rhodes, Mary Mason. I give and bequeath to 
my cousin Margaret Tyndall my best gilt salt and my trencher salt and one 
dozen of silver spoons. My cousin Thomas Scott and Elizabeth his wife. 
I make and ordain Sir John Tyndall, knight, my sole and only executor, 
but if he shall refuse then I ordain and appoint the said Judith Parkhurst 
to be the sole executrix. Sealed, published and declared 21 June 1608. 
Proved by Judith Parkhurst. Confirmed by sentence 2 December 1608. 

Windebanck, 89 and 106. 

Thomas Fisher of London, skinner, 23 November 1612, proved 19 
April 1613. All my lands and leases to my son Thomas Fisher, but wife 
Susan to have out of them two third parts so long as she contiuueth in her 
widow's estate, and if she marry the half for term of life. To son Thomas 
also certain desperate debts due unto me from divers beyond seas, the 
specialties whereof were committed unto my son's hands by William Hamp- 
ton, that out of it (if any part thereof come in) he may increase his stock. 
My will is that the same my son Thomas buy of my sister Anne Sadler her 
thirds which she hath in the Inn called the Bell in Puckridge and the lands 
thereunto belonging, so that he doth not exceed the sum of an hundred 
pounds for the price thereof, and the same to make over to the ffeoffees of 
the town of Standon, the rent whereof cometh to five and forty pounds per 
annum, of which I would have twenty pounds remain forever towards the 
maintenance of the school there erected, ten pounds to buy bread which I 
would have distributed amongst the poor of that parish every Sunday in 
the church, at the discretion of the overseers, and five pounds to buy books, 
paper and ink for poor scholars as shall require, and the overplus (if any 
remain) to go to the reparation of the school. And my will is that the other 
ten pounds which remain shall be paid unto Christ's his Hospital every half 
year by equal portions by the ffeoffees of the town of Standon. Provision 
in case of default. One hundred and tvventy pounds for setting poor prison- 
ers free. To the Company of Skinners that forty and six pounds which I 
lent for the Irish Plantation and so much more as will make it up an hun- 
dred marks. Certain individuals named and a bequest to the poor of St. 
Margaret's in Lothbury. To Christopher Gibson, ray sister's son, and to 
Sara Ingram, his sister, ten pounds each. To the son and daughter of my 
brother Richard Fisher, either of them, ten pounds apiece, his legacy to be 
paid when he cometh to lawful age. The three preachers of St. Antulins. 
My cousin Richard Fisher of the Temple. To my daughters Susan and 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1035 

Sara Fisher, either of them, two thousand pounds apiece. No great pomp 
to be used upon my funerals. My wife and son Thomas Fisher to be 
executors and my brother Francis Tindale, Mr. William Towerson and Mr. 
Giles Parsloe overseers. My brother Francis to have fifty pounds and the 
other two overseers twenty pounds apiece, for their pains. I give to my 
brother Sir John Tyndale six pounds to buy him a ring. Capell, 27. 

UMPHRET Tindall. Doctor in Divinity and President of the Queen's 
College in Cambridge, Deau of Ely, 12 March 1613, proved 18 November 
1614. For my funeral I leave it to the discretion of Jane my wife, to be 
buried according to my calling. I give to the use of the society of Queen's 
College all my books in folio which are not in the library already. Other 
gifts to the College. To the poor of Ely. To my sister Upcher (during 
her natural life) all my household stuff &c. which I have in the vicaridge 
house of Soame, and after her decease to Amye Coxye, her daughter, 
except the portals and wainscot and glass in the windows which I give to 
mv successor, to remain in succession to the use of the vicar of Soame for 
the time being forever. I give to Jane my loving wife the copyhold I have 
in Sutton, which my brother Upcher hath taken up in trust for me &c, 
and thirty pounds due upon a bond by Thomas Tayler of Lichfield, gentle- 
man, and also the rest of my chattels &c. and I make her sole executrix. 
And I do appoint my brother Mr. Francis Tindall supervisor, giving him, 
for a remembrance of me, my seal ring. Lawe, 108. 

Sir John Tyndall of Much Maplestead, Essex, knight, (without 
date) proved 2 December 1616. To the poor of the parish where I happen 
to be buried forty shillings. I have by deeds disposed of certain of my 
hereditaments &c. The residue to my dearly beloved wife, whom I also 
appoint sole executor, during her life and afterwards to my brother Francis 
Tindall Esq., and make him executor; and if he die or refuse I make 
my son Deane Tyndall the executor; and if he die or refuse then I make 
my son Arthur Tyndall and my daughter Margaret Tyndall sole execu- 
tors. I give to my said wife the gilt bason and ewer and the gilt cups 
which sometime were her first husband's and likewise the silver spoons and 
white silver bowls which were his also. I give unto her my great and little 
white silver salt with their covers and my gilt tankard and all the chains 
of gold and borders of gold and other Jewells which she bath heretofore 
used to wear. I desire Sir John Deane, knight, and the lady his wife, my 
brother Francis Tyndall and my sister Fisher and my nephew Mr. Thomas 
Fisher and my loving brothers in law Mr. Thomas Egerton and Mr. Ste- 
phen Egerton may have rings given them by mine executor, of some conve- 
nient value, to be worn by them in remembrance of my love unto them. 
My house wherein I now dwell, in Much Maplestead &c. to my son Arthur. 
Proved by Deane Tindall, Anna Tindall the relict and Francis Tindall, 
executors named in the will, expressly renouncing. 

Against the above, on the margiu of the leaf, was written, " Aliud testa- 
tum p' bat* mens Junij 1020." Cope, 126. 

Where I Sir John Tyndall. knight, one of the Masters in Ordinary of 
the King's Majesty's High Court of Chancery, was by the Right Hon. 
Thomas, Lord Ellesmere, Lord Chancellor of England, appointed with Sir 
Edward Philippes, knight, late Master of the Rolls of the said Court, to 
receive divers Recognizances in our names of divers of His Majesty's sub- 



1036 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLANI> 

jects. to the use of the said Court, which by the decease of the said Master 
uf the Rolls are survived unto me. I, in performance of the trust com- 
mitted unto me concerning the same do, by this my last will and testament 
only touching the said Recognizances, constitute and appoint the R f Hon. 
Sir Julius Ceasar, knight, now Master of the Rolls of the said Court my 
sole and only executor of the said Recognizances to the use of the said 
Court. Iu witness &c 17 January 1615. Proved 30 June 1620. 

Soame, 65. 

[Gov. John Winthrop, of Mass., married for his third wife, Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Sir John Tyndal, Master in Chancery, whose wife was Anne Egerton, 
widow of William Deane and mother of Sir John Deane by her first marriage. 

Sir John Tyndal of Hockwold, in Norfolk, 1539, was the grandfather, and Sir 
Thomas Tyndal, 1584, the father of the aforesaid Sir John Tyndal. 

Dr. Humphrey Tyndal Avas one of his brothers. 

For many references to theTyodals, Deanes and Egertons, see Life and Let- 
ters of John Winthrop, vol. i. Robert C. Winthrop, Jr.] 

Anne Tindall of Much Maplested, Essex, widow, 14 June 1620, 
proved 2 November 1620. I give to my loving and eldest son Sir John 
Deane for a token of my love my right hand bracelet of gold with the round 
stone and to my loving aud kind daughter in law his wife my other brace- 
let of gold, the fellow to it, to wear as a remembrance of my love as long 
as they shall live, if so it please them ; also I give to that sweet brood their 
children ten pounds to be bestowed in some pretty Jewells for each of them 
at the discretion of my executor. I give to my eldest daughter Rachell 
Deane my silver standish and to my daughter Anne Deane my two new 
silver porringers. To my loving brother in law Mr. Francis Tindall my 
wedding ring that I was married with to his brother. To my loving and 
kind brother Mr. Steven Egerton and to my loving sister his wife, for want 
of a better legacy, my gilt tankard and to my loving and good brother Mr. 
Thomas Egerton four pounds to be bestowed in a piece of plate. To my 
loving son Deane Tindall and to his heirs my gilt bason and ewer with nest 
of gilt cups and salts suitable thereto and the gilt spoons; aud to my loving 
daughter in law his wife my pair of best borders of goldsmith's work and 
icy cipress box with tills, with such trifles as she shall find in it. To my 
god daughter Ann Tindall ray great silver salt and the trencher salt belong- 
ing to it and twenty pounds in money and to my grandchild John Tindall 
two silver bowls, a bigger and a lesser, and my two livery pots and ten 
pounds iu money. To my sou Arthur Tindall thirty pounds. To our pas- 
tor Mr. Blith three pounds as a remembrance of my love to him. To my 
daughter Tindall my velvet gown and kirtle and my velvet cloak. I give 
to my daughter Winthorp my Tuftafeta gown and my satin suite which I 
use to wear with the mantle gown I wear with it and my satin "boddies" 
and my petticoat with the choice of my best wearing linen. And I also 
give her my cabinet which her father gave me. I give her my green velvet 
box with tills aud all such things as be in them at the time of my death. 
Marcery Freeburne my servant. My niece Gibson and mv god daughter 
Ann Ilunwich, her daughter, Mary Freeburne. The poor. I give unto 
my loving son and daughter John and Margaret Winthorp and their two 
sous Steven and Adam all my plate that I usually use in my chamber with 
all other such plate as is mine in the house not before named. Also I give 
them all such money not before bequeathed as is mine whether already in 
my hands or due unto me from any person, my debts (if any be) and funeral 
charges deducted. I make ray loving son Deane Tindall my sole executor. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1037 

T Ljive unto my loving In-other and sister Winthorp each of them a ring of 
the value of twenty shillings apiece in a remembrance of my love by me 
Ann Tindall to them. Sundry servants &c. Soame, 94. 

Sarah Egerton of Blackfriars, London, widow, 19 August 1624, proved 
28 December 1624. To be buried in the place called the vault in the 
Blackfryers near the body of my dear and loving husband. To my most 
loving cousin Deane Tyndale of Much Maplesteed. Essex, Esq., one hun- 
dred pounds. To his two daughters Mrs. Anne Tyndale and Elizabeth 
Tyndale one hundred pounds apiece. Item I give and bequeath unto my 
loVing cousin Mrs. Margaret Winthrop wife unto John Winthrope of " Grot- 
ten "in the County of Suffolk Esq. one hundred pounds. To ray cousin 
Anne Gibson, widow, one hundred pounds. To my cousin Mrs. Felix Hil- 
derson twenty pounds. To my cousin Mr. Thomas Egerton minister of 
Adstocke, Bucks., twenty pounds and to Elizabeth Jones, his sister, twenty 
pounds. To my loving brother Sir Thomas Croke of Ireland, knight and 
baronet, the seal ring with the Death's head which was my husband's and 
to his son, Mr. Thomas Crooke of Gray's Inn, Midd., Esq., my watch. To 
my brother Mr. Samuel Crooke. clerk, my wedding ring. To each of my 
other brothers, Mr. Dr. Crooke and Richard Crooke, clerk, forty shillings 
apiece to buy them rings in remembrance of me. To my niece Alice Crooke, 
daughter unto my brother Dr. Crooke, all my plate. To my sisters Mrs. 
Leeche, Mrs. Rowse and Mrs. Crooke, wife of my said brother Richard, 
forty shillings apiece to buy rings &c. To Mr. Gouge, lecturer of the Black- 
friers, forty shillings to buy a ring and I desire him to be supervisor. My 
cousin Mr. Deane Tindall to be sole executor. Byrde, 110. 

William Deane of Much Maplested, Essex, Esq., 3 May 1585, proved 
16 October 1585. To be buried in the chancel of the parish church there. 
Wife Anne, Brother John Deane of Whalley, in the County of Lancaster, 
and John Deane, his sou, who is now servant unto my Lord Bishop of 
Winchester. My manor of Tirrington, Norfolk. Peregrine Parker, my 
servant. My servant John Parmiter. My daughters Rachell and Anne. 
My son John. Friends and kinsmen Richard Shuttleworth, Sergeant at 
the Law, and Alexander Nowell, Dean of " Powlles," to be overseers of 
my will and guardians of my children. 

A Codicil made 2G August 27 Elizabeth. To my wife the lease &c. of 
lands &c. in St. Mary Ottery, Devon, or elsewhere in Devon, which I had 
with her. My well beloved father in law Thomas Egerton of London, 
Esq. and Anne his wife, ray well beloved mother in law. My loving broth- 
ers in law Mr. Lionell Egerton, Mr. Thomas Egerton and Mrs. Stephen 
Egerton. To John Deane my son my chain of gold which I usually wear, 
my hangings of arras which serve for my dining chamber, my carpet of 
needle work, with roses, and one other carpet of Turkey work and all my 
armor and all my books &c. My cousin and friend Jeremy Bettenham. 
My friend Mrs. Anne Upcher, widow. My cousin Mrs. Katherine Nowell. 
Mrs. Anne Wedgewood, my wife's niece. My faithful servant John Par- 
raenter. My servant Thomas Brydge. My loving friend and kinsman Mr. 
William Whytaker, now chief Divinity Lecturer in Cambridge shall be 
joined with ray overseers as a third overseer, and if he refuse then my 
friend Mr. Thomas Bowyer Esq.. one of the Readers of the Temple where 
the new Hall i-. 

A second Codicil added 2'.) August, the same year. Another Codicil 13 



1038 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

September, the same year. In another Codicil dated 10 September of the 
same year he refers to Alexander Nowell Dean of " Powlles " as well 
beloved uncle and William Why taker as cousin. He refers to any gain 
that may arise out of his money " w th out the blotte of Usurie (which I doe 
abhorre). 

Sundry proceedings about this will are noted in the margin of the 
Register as occurring in 1586, 1587, 1599 and 1601 when John Deaue the 
son finally took oath as executor (4 March 1601). Brudenell, 45. 

Anne Deane of Much Maplested, Essex, sister unto Sir John Deane of 
Maplested. knight, 26 June 1624, proved 26 January 1624. To be buried 
in the chancel of the parish church there. To the poor of the said parish 
three pounds. To my loving sister Mrs. Rachell Deane all my lands, tene- 
ments and hereditaments, with all my right and interest into the manor of 
Terrington Howard, Norfolk. I give her also one little white box with all 
the money, gold and Jewells therein contained, and my best gown and petti- 
coat and all my plate. Item I give and bequeath unto my sister Mrs. Win- 
throp one hundred pounds. To my niece Mrs. Anne Deaue one hundred 
pounds, to be paid within one quarter of a year after my decease. To my 
brother Mr. Arthur Tindall Esq. ten pounds. To my " nevew " Mr. Drew 
Deane ten pounds. To my two nieces Mrs. Anne Tyndall and Elizabeth 
Tyndall ten pounds apiece. To Mr. Blyth our minister five pounds, whom 
I desire to preach at my funeral. To my cousin Mrs. Anne Gibson five 
pounds. To Joane Bettes the wife of Thomas Bettes of Gestingthorp two 
pounds ; and to Margery Freeborne Katherine Warner Anne Rayner, ser- 
vants unto my brother Mr. Deane Tyndall, twenty shillings apiece. To 
Joane Edwardes ten shillings. To Lucretia Read wife of William Reade 
of Maplested twenty shillings. To my servant Margaret Mutley twenty 
four pounds and all my wearing apparell &c. Seventeen pounds for funeral 
expences and other charges about proving my will. And all my debts 1 
will shall be paid out of the use moneys of two hundred pounds due unto 
me from Sir Robert Crane and one Joseph Cole. I ordain and appoint my 
loving brother Mr. Deane Tyndale Esq. executor &c. And if he shall 
refuse to perform this last duty my desire is that my brother in law Mr. 
John Winthrop of Groton Esq. will be my executor. 

Wit: Fra. Whitmore. 

Commission of admon. &c. issued (as above) to Sir John Deane, knight, 
natural and lawful brother &c, for the reason that Deane Tyndall and 
John Winthrop, the executors named in the will, expres'srv renounced &c. 

Clarke, 8. 

Margaret Rand of the parish of St. Ann and Agnes, London, widow, 
8 November 1625, proved 19 December 1625. To be buried in the new 
churchyard. To my three sisters and two brothers fifteen shillings apiece 
to buy them rings to be made in death's heads, which I desire that they 
will wear for my sak". To my brother in law Hildersonn (the same). 
My cousin Ann Huuiucke. To my cousin Deane Tyndall (another death's 
head ring). A nurse and certain servants. Mr. James Acton and his 
wife. To my daughter Mary Cooper and her daughter Elizabeth the six 
and forty pounds which is in ray cousin Tyndall's hand the executor of my 
aunt Egerton. My son in law William Cooper and Mary his wife to be 
executors of- this my last will and testament and Mr. Acton to be overseer. 

Clarke, 134. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1039 

Sir Joiix Deane of Maplested Magna, Essex, knight, 9 February 1625, 
proved 4 May L626. My daughter Anne Diane. My daughters Elizabeth, 
Dorcas, Frances and Mildred. My son John Deane. My said five daugh- 
ters at eighteen years. My son Drewe Deane. My beloved wife. 

Proved by Dame Anne Deane the relict and one of the executors &c. 
A later probate 20 November 1G2G by the oath of Drew Deane, son &c. 

Hele, 57. 

Rachell Deaxe of Great Maplestead, Essex, gentlewoman, 27 April 
1626, proved 7 June 1627. To be buried in the church or churchyard of 
the parish where it shall please God to call me. To the Lady Deane, my 
sister and widow unto my brother Sir John Deane, knight, lately deceased, 
one fair diamond riug " enameled " black. Anne Deane, my niece, eldest 
daughter to Sir Johu. My niece Elizebeth Deane, second daughter. My 
nephew John Deane, second son of Sir John. To Edmund Steedman, 
clerk, parson of Onehowse, Suffolk, my biggest drinking bowl of silver. 
Sundry others named. To Deane Tindall Esq. a ring of five pounds price. 
My nephew Drue Deane, eldest son unto Sir John Deane. The said 
Deane Tindall Esq. and Drue Deane to be joint executors. 

Stephen Deaue one of the witnesses. Skynner 60. 

John Whittixgham, citizen and grocer of London and now of Batter- 
sey, Surrey, geutleman, 16 August 1619, proved 21 September 1619. 
Reference to covenants &c. bearing date 29 November 1614, entered into 
before my intermarriage with Sara my now wife. A bond of two thousand 
five hundred pounds unto Humfrey Phippes and Richard Brente for per- 
formance of said covenants. My house and lands at Battersey. My mes- 
suages &c. in Whitecross Street in the parish of St. Giles without Cripple- 
gate. Other tenements and lauds. Bonds to be delivered unto mine 
executor at his now dwelling house in Bassieshawe London, to be cancelled 
and made void. My daughter Dorothy. My son John Whittingham. 
My daughter Mary. To my son William Whittingham a gilt bowl called 
a boat which was given him by his godfather Cranmer. My sister War- 
red. Sir John Weld of Arnold's, knight. My sister Monger. My sister 
Ditchfeilde. My nephew Humfrey Warrell. Mrs. Susan Powell of Wans- 
worth. My nephew John Blastocke at one and twenty. My son in law 
and daughter Gere. 

Item, I give unto my brother in law Josua Winthroppe and to his wife 
twenty shillings apiece to make each of them a ring. My cousin Harrison 
and her husband and ray sons in law Thomas Vincent and William Palmer. 
Joane Barton, my sister Ellis her maid. Robert Aston mine apprentice. 
The poor &c The residue to be divided amongst all my children. I make 
and ordain my trusty and well beloved brother in law William Cranmer 
executor, and I desire my loving friend Mr. Humfrey Phippes and my 
loving brother in law Mr. Edward Ditchfeilde to be overseers. 

W 1 " Geere one of the witnesses. Parker, 88. 

[For some Whittingham wills and notes, see Register, vol. xxxix., pp. 
170-2; ant<>, pp. 111-114. — Editor. 

Joshua Winthrop (born July 10, 1559, died March, 1626) was eldest son of 
William Winthrop, uncle of Gov. John Winthrop of Mass. (For a letter of 
this William Winthrop to Foxe, the martyrologist, see 1 Proceedings Mass. 
Hist. Soc, vol xv., pp. 262-3.) Joshua Winthrop, like his father before him, 
was in business in London, where he married Anne, daughter of Vincent Nor- 



1040 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

rington, mercer, and subsequently settled at Bandon, in the south of Ireland, 
where he died. He left at least one child, " Joshua Winthrop the younger, of 
The Midchells, near Bandon, gent.," who administered his father's estate in 
April, 1626, one "Thomas Harrison, gent.," joining in the bond. Nothing 
more has been ascertained concerning this younger Joshua Winthrop, but the 
Irish branch of the Winthrop family is supposed to descend from him. 

It does not appear which of these two Joshua Winthrops is the one referred 
to as " brother-in-law " in the will of John Whittingham, 1619 ; but it was prob- 
ably the elder Joshua, and it would seem that one or other of the wives of 
Whittingham must have been a Norrington. 

It may be added that the elder Joshua had a brother, Adam Winthrop, fourth 
of that name, and two sisters— Elizabeth, wife of Rev. Humphrey Munning, 
Rector of Brettenham, co. Suffolk, and Sarah, wife of John Frost, of Bury St. 
Edmunds. The last named sister is recorded to have died in 1603, so that she 
could not have been "Sara my nowe wife," mentioned by Whittingham in 
161'J. Robert C. Winthrop, Jr.] 

John Nowell of the ancient town of Rye in Sussex, jurat, 8 Septem- 
ber 1638, proved 9 October 1638. The poor of Rye. My eldest daugh- 
ter Mercie Nowell. To the said Mercie one gold ring which was her own 
mother's wedding ring and three silver spoons. To my daughter Mary 
Burwash, the wife of William Burwash, one hundred pounds if the said 
William hath not had so much of me before my death. To my youngest 
daughter Rebecca Nowell one hundred pounds at day of marriage or age of 
eighteen. To my eldest son Harbert Nowell my double salt, silver and 
gilt, which my mother gave unto me when I was first married, and my great 
bible and Chronicles, my gold ring with my seal of arms and all the wain- 
scot, benches, shelves, glass and iron plates in my house at Monfield aud all 
the timber aud timber trees on my lands at Monfield &c. My kinswomen 
Mary Awsten and Ann Awsten. My wife Sara Nowell. My messuages, 
lauds &c. in Sussex. My messuage &c. in Rye. My messuages &c. in 
Playden, Sussex. My sons John, Samuel and William Nowell (minors). 
My wife to have the bringing up of my children which I had by her. 

Item, my will and desire is that whensoever the new incumbent minister 
of the parish of Hopsey in Shropshire shall depart this life that then my 
cousin Mr. William Hay and Mr. John Bigg, executor of the last will and 
testament of my cousin " Smalehoope Bigge " deceased, shall present my 
son Harbert Nowell unto the living and parsonage of Ilopsey, otherwise 
such person as my said sou Harbert and they shall think fit. To Mr. John 
Harrison, curate of Rye &c. My wife Sara to be executrix and my kins- 
men Harbert Hay, of Glyude Esq., William Hay, of Little Horsted gen 1 , 
my brother Mr. Joseph Benbrick and Mr. Walter Hawes to be overseers. 

Lee, 119. 

[This must be that " John Nowell of Rye, gentleman," referred to in will of 
Mr. Smalehope Bigg of Cranbrooke, Kent, ante, p. 21 (q. v.). 

H. F. Waters.] 

John Newton of Colliton, Devon, chirurgeon, 3 April 1646, proved 
24 April 1647. My wife Alice shall have and enjoy all that house wherein 
she now dwelleth and occupieth during her life if those three lives hereafter 
mentioned, or either of them, so long shall live, that, is to say, John Grace, 
Tamsin his wife and Tamsin his daughter. And after her death my daugh- 
ter Mary shall have and enjoy the said house during all the term then to 
come and unexpired. And if my daughter Mary die before Alice my wife 
my will is that all such goods &c. as my wife hath now in keeping &c. shall 
be sold and the money that it yieldeth shall be equally divided between my 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1041 

son Anthony and my daughter Joane, or their children. And if my daugh- 
ter Mary die childless and if both my said wife and she die before the expi- 
ration of the said term of three lives my will is that Edward Newton, son 
of William Newton of Waddon in the parish of Southley shall then have 
and enjoy the said house &c during all the term to come and unexpired. 

Also I give unto Anthony, my said son, and Joaue, my said daughter, 
which are now in New England, six pounds apiece, to be paid by Mary, 
my said daughter, within half a year after my death. The residue to my 
-aid daughter Mary whom I make mine executrix, and I do appoint my 
well beloved and faithful friends iu trust John Purchase ot Maymbree and 
Nicholas Bauckes my kinsman to be my overseers herein, and for their 
pains therein I give them five shillings apiece. 

Proved by the oath of Mary Stocker als Newton, natural and lawful 
daughter of the deceased and executrix named iu the same will. 

Fines, 69. 

[The son Anthony, in New England, we suppose was the person named by 
Savage, vol. 3, p. 276, as followsT "Newton, Anthony, Dorchester, of Brain- 
tree 1640, engaged 1652, in sett, of Lancaster, was freeman 1671." — Editor.] 

Memorandum that Mr. Nathaniel Norcrosse late of St. Dunstan's iu 
the East, minister, deceased, departed this life upon or about the 10 th of 
August 1662 and upon the Friday and Saturday before his death, whilst he 
was of perfect mind and memory, he did declare that he was very ill and 
desired to settle the estate by will aud did then say and declare that he did 
give all his estate whatsoever, both in old England and New England, to 
Marv Norcrosse his wife and that he did make her the said Mary his ex- 
ecutrix, the which words, or the very like in effect and substance, he did 
declare in the presence of credible witnesses and was at all the times of the 
publishing and declaring thereof of sound and perfect mind and memory. 
Thomas Brookes, Edw. Flemings. 

The above will was proved by M rs Mary Norcrosse the relict &c. 

Laud, 129. 

[Rev. Nathaniel Norcross was a son of Jeremiah Norcross, an early settler of 
"Watertown. lie was born in London, about 1618, and was educated at Catharine 
Hall, in the University of Cambridge, where he received his A.B. in 1636-7. He 
was in Salem, 1639, and joined the church there 1641, but subsequently removed 
to WatartoAvn, where his father had settled in 1638. He probably married Mary, 
daughter of John Gilbert of Taunton. Iu 1643 he was admitted a freeman of 
Massachusetts. He was one of the company that intended to plant at Nash- 
awav, now Lancaster; was the first signer of the petition to the General Court, 
June 12, 1645, and was invited to preach there. He is said to have received a call to 
Exeter, N. H., the same year. In 1648 he preached at Agamenticus, now York, 
Me. He returned to England in 1649 or 1650. He is named as an ejected min- 
ister at "Walsin^ham in "Norfolk, in Palmer's Nonconformist's Memorial, ed. 
1777, vol. 2, p. 206, but he died a fortnight before Bartholomew day, 1662. See 
Norcross Genealogy, by Joel W. Norcross (MS. in the library of the N. E. 
Hist. Gen. Society) vol. 2, pp. 32-5; Savage's Gen. Dictionary, vol. 3, pp. 286-7; 
Winthrop's New England, vol.2, ed. 1853, p. 194; Nourse's Early Records of 
Lancaster, pp. 12-14^ Bond's Watertown, p. 376; Worcester Magazine, vol. 2, 
p. 274. — Editor.] 

[The following will of Mary Cooper is communicated to the Glkaxixgs at Mr. 
Waters's request by Prof. Frederick Tuckerman of Amherst, Mass. — Editor.] 

Mary Cooper of London, widow, 20 February 169S-9, with a cod- 
icil dated 8 February 1699, proved 26 April 1700. I give and be- 
queath unto my loving sou Thomas Cooper and to my loving daughter 



1042 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Mehetabel his wife and to my grandson William Cooper ten pounds 
amongst theui for mourning. To my loving son William Cooper for 
mourning ten pounds. To my loving son in law John Ellis and to my 
loving daughter Mary his wife and to my grandchildren Mary. Sarah, 
Hannah, John and Thomas Ellis for mourning amongst them all fifteen 
pounds. To my loving son in law William Walford and to my loving 
daughter Sarah his wife and to my grandchildren Elizabeth and Sarah 
Walford for mourning amongst them all twelve pounds. To my loving 
son the said Thomas Cooper thirty and two pounds, being the remainder 
of one hundred pounds promised him by me to reimbuse him of the loss by 
him sustained by and from my late son Benjamin Cooper deceased. To my 
grandson the said William Cooper fifty pounds to be paid unto him at his 
attainment to the age of one and twenty years. To my said daughter 
Mehetabel Cooper my silver tankard. To my said daughter Sarah Walford 
two hundred pounds in performance of a promise by me made upon her 
marriage with her said husband William Walford, and in full discharge of 
a bond by me since given therefor. To my said daughter Sarah Walford 
my wrought suite of curtains and valances with the feather bed and bolster 
thereunto belonging. To my two daughters Mary Ellis and Sarah Wal- 
ford all my books to be divided between them share and share alike. To 
my grandchild Mary Ellis twenty pounds and also my cabinet. To my 
grandchildren Sarah, Hannah, John and Thomas Ellis twenty shillings 
apiece to buy each of them a ring, and to my said grandchild Sarah Ellis 
my great looking-glass. To my grandchildren Elizabeth and Sarah and 
Mary Walford twenty shillings apiece to buy each of them a ring. To my 
loving brother in law William Cooper five pounds. To my worthy friends 
Mr. Collins and Mr. Bragg, the younger, each of them a guinea. To Mr. 
John Bennett and his wife ten shillings apiece to buy them rings. To Mrs. 
Mary Day ten shillings for a ring. I order and appoint the sum of forty 
shillings to be distributed by my executors amongst such and so many poor 
people of the Church as they shall think fit. All the rest and residue of 
my goods, etc. etc. after my debts paid and funeral expenses discharged I 
give unto my said loving daughters Mary Ellis and Sarah Walford to be 
equally divided between them. And I do hereby ordain and appoint my 
worthy friends Mr. Thomas Peacock and Mr. [Joseph] Webster deacons of 
the congregation whereunto I belong joint executors. And I give to my 
said executors the sum of five pounds apiece for their care and trouble in 
the executiou of this my will. 

Witnessed by Richard Moore, Adm: Horton and John Hooker, scr. at 
the west end of Royal Exchange. 

In the codicil she bequeaths the legacy bequeathed to her by her son 
William Cooper, deceased, late merchant in Guiuea, to her son in law 
William Walford in case he fails to receive out of the effects remaining in 
the hands of Mr. Nicholas Burberidge, merchant in Guinea, and Mr. John 
Browne, merchant now residing in London, trustees or overseers, full satis- 
faction and payment for several cargoes of goods sent and consigned to the 
said William Cooper. But in case the said William Walford shall receive 
out of the effects aforesaid or otherwise full satisfaction for the said several 
cargoes, then she gives the legacy to be equally divided amongst her three 
children. Thomas Cooper, Mary Ellis and Sarah Walford. Noel. 53. 

[Mary Cooper, the testatrix, was the widow of Thomas Cooper, of the parish 
of St. Mary Abchurch, citizen ami merchant taylor of Lonclou. He was the 
son of William Cooper, by his wife Cicely, of Browne Candover, iu the county 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANING8 IX ENGLAND. 1043 

of Hants, gentleman. Thomas Cooper died intestate in May 1G78. His widow 
died in the parish of St. Katherine Cree Church, London, in February 1699. Of 
their sons, Thomas, probably the eldest, was born 3 December, 1657 or 8. He 
came to Boston in 1675, and is ancestor of this family of Cooper in New Eng- 
land. Some account of him and his posterity may be found in the Register, 
vol. xliv. p. 53. William, merchant, died at Cabo Corso Castle, gold coast of 
Africa, 3 January 1698, and his will (Heme, 158), bearing date 1G98-9, was 
proved in London 30 October 1702. Benjamin, boru in August 1GG9, was a 
scholar of Merchant Taylors' School, 1681-83; ob. ante 1699.— F. Tuckehman.] 

Samuel Jackson of New England, mariner, belonging to their Majes- 
ties' Ship the Windsor Castle, appoints Anthony Dowrich of Wapping in 
Middlesex, " sailesman," his attorney to receive wages, pay, bounty mouey, 
prize money &c. &c. (the customary form of a sailor's will) dated 29 No- 
vember 1692 and proved 9 February J 692. Coker, 28. 

Edward Severy (without date) proved 17 October 1694. My body 
to be buried in the New Church yard of St. Michael in Barbados. Five 
pounds to be laid out at my burial. I give aud bequeath to my loving 
brother Andrew Severy, living in '• Marvillhead" in New England these 
things; first, two bills signed by the Royal Company for three years salary 
serving in Guinea in Africa, (2) three mouths wages at five and fifty shil- 
lings per month, under the command of Capt. Hugh Samson, Commander 
of the Ship Merica, (3) four gold rings, my chest and clothes; and the rest 
of my things I leave to my executor. 

Proved by Christian Peeterson. Box, 177. 

[In the Probate Act Book for 1694 the testator of the above will is described 
as belonging to the ship America, but dying at Barbados. H. F. Waters.] 

George Osboldston of Dalisford in the Co. of Worcester, clerk, 12 
August 1645, proved 17 February 1645. To be buried in the chancel of 
Dalisford. The poor of Oddington. Elizath (sic) Gaynsford, my brother 
George Guyses his daughter. Margaret Treganon his daughter. To my 
brother Edward Osboldston, citizen and skinner of London, all my wearing 
apparel and all my books in the house. To my sister Martha, my said 
brother Edward's wife, my diamond gold ring, to enjoy during her life, and 
after to her daughter Martha Osboldston forever. All the rest and residue 
of my goods and chattels unbequeathed I give and bequeath to the* said 
Martha Osboldston, the daughter of the said Edward and Martha Osbold- 
stone, and do make her my sole and whole executrix of this my last 
will aud testament. And also my will is that my brother Edward and 
his now wife Martha shall have and occupy all the aforesaid goods and 
chattels in trust for the said Martha the younger until she comes to the age 
of fourteen years or fifteen, and then to be truly and faithfully delivered 
unto her. My brother Edward Osboldston and my servant Richard Allen 
of Dalisford to be overseers. 

Commission issued on above date (17 February 1645) to Edward Os- 
boldston the natural and lawful father of Martha Osboldston, niece on the 
brother's side of the deceased and executrix named in his will, to adminis- 
ter the goods &c. during her minority. Twisse, 27. 

Edward Osboldston citizen and skinner of London, 3 September 
1644, proved 24 April 1649. To my son Edward Osboldston my gold seal 
ring &c. To my daughter Elizabeth his wife " Good Newes from Canaan." 
To my daughter Hanna Durrant my Bible in quarto that was her mother's 



1044 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

and Mr. Wilson on the Romans. To my son Andrew Durant a book of 
Marbeck's Common Place. To Johanna and Mary Durraut, my grand- 
children, ten shillings each. To my daughter Martha Osholdston the rever- 
sion of the lease of my shop at Brittains Bursse which I hold of the Right 
Hon. Lord the Earl of Salisbury for one and twenty years from 29 Decem- 
ber 1638, which said shop I have let a lease unto Mrs. Elizabeth Norbury 
for ten years which did begin 24 June 1640 &c. To my brother Mr. 
George Osholdston of Dallisford, parson there, a remembrance. My loving 
brother in law Mr. George Tench. My loving sister Mrs. Bridget Tench 
and her daughter my cousin Ann Hutchinson. My loving sister Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Harper. My sister Elioner Collens. My sister Mrs. Mary William- 
son. My cousin Mrs. Ann Hutchinson the elder. My cousin Ann Hutch- 
inson her daughter. My brother Mr. Richard Williamson. My kinswoman 
Mrs. Ann Sanderson. My wife Martha to have the residue and to be sole 
executrix and to bring up my daughter Martha. My brother in law George 
Tench, girdler, and my kinsman John Hastings,* goldsmith, to be overseers. 

Fairfax, 56. 

Edward Osboldston citizen and painter stainer of London, 6 February 
1691, proved 17 July 1693. To each aud every of my cousins, being the 
sons and daughters of my late sister Mrs. Henlock, the sum of one shilling 
apiece of lawful money of England in full of what they, or either of them, 
can demand out of all or any part of my estate. The residue to my loving 
friend and cousin Mary Balland, whom I make full and sole executrix &c. 

Coker, 115. 

Michael Revell of Mary Maudlins Old Fish Street, citizen and fish- 
monger of London, 11 April 1659, proved 8 June 1659. I am indebted to 
Susan Andrewes, widow, the sum of ten pounds, she having no evidence or 
writing under my band to show for the same. This and other debts to be 
paid according to equity and good conscience. My lands and tenements in 
Dronfield, Derby, to my brothers William and Lyonell Revell. My mes- 
suage &c. on the back side of old Fish Street, London, to Susan Andrews, 
she paying two hundred aud ten pounds to my executors &c, otherwise to 
my said two brothers. To my brother in law Master Francis Hunlocke 
ten pounds and to my sister Martha his wife five pounds. To my brother 
in law Master John Revell five pounds and to Rebecca his daughter five 
pounds. To my brother in law Master Edward Revell five pounds and to 
his son Robert five pounds. To the poor of Dronfield, Derby, five pounds. 
The residue to Rebecca, Mary, Elizabeth and John Revell, children of my 
said brother in law M r John Revell, and to Deborah, Robert and Dorothy 
Revell, children of my brother in law Master Edward Revell, equally. My 
two brothers William and Lyonell Revell to be executors. Pell, 331. 

Denham IIunlock of Chelsea, merchant taylor, 25 June 1677, proved 
24 November 1077. If it please God to take away my burdensome life in 
London or Westminster to be brried near my most dear and beloved wife 
in St. Clements. My executors to be my dear brother Francis Huidock 
and my dear sister Isabell Walmesley and my overseer to be George Hill 

• This mention of a " kinsman John Hastings, goldsmith," serves to fix tiie testator's 
parentage. The pedigree of Hastings in the Visitation of London (1633-1G34) shows a 
mati-h of Fcrdinando Osbalston of Kdington and Elizabeth, one of the daughters of John 
Hastings ofElford, Oxon, Esq., by Edith da. of Sir Richard Yorkc of tiie city of York. 
Her sister Dorothy was married to John Walwin of Dclesford (Dalisford). H. F. W. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1045 

Esq. of Westminster. My executors to perform all my legacies in a sched- 
ule annexed and to be paid forty pounds apiece and to Justice Hill a piece 
of plate of ten pounds. To my dear daughter Sarah Grice the lease of my 
house over Durham Gate in the Strand. Her son Thomas Grice. All Inn- 
six children. Her daughters Ann Grice and Frances Grice. I do give to 
M r Skelton two hundred pounds and shall desire that he may make some 
settlement more for his wife Sarah Skelton. Mr. Cassells I must pay fifty 
pounds at my death and do give him one hundred pounds more and shall 
desire him to make some more settlement on his wife in consideration. To 
Mr. Predwrick that married Joane Grice one hundred and fifty pouuds 
besides what he owes me and to his two children, JJenham, ten pounds and 
his other son five pounds. And if M r Skelton have any child whom I am 
godfather to I give to that child ten pounds in plate and to all his other 
children five pounds apiece. To my grandchild Frances Morley one hun- 
dred pounds to be bestowed in plate and given her when she is twelve years 
of a»e. To my grandchild Mr. John Allen one hundred pounds. To Mr. 
Barrons son George ten pounds and to all his other children five pounds 
apiece, in plate. To Mr. Bud that married Sarah Allen, to her child 
twenty pounds in plate. To Francis Bamptou twenty pounds and twenty 
pounds out of Ireland, in all forty pounds. My daughter Lanckford. To 
my brother Francis Hunlock all my deb:s due, to me in Ireland, of what 
nature so ever they be, and he to give to my nephew Denham Hunlock, 
his grandchild, fifty pounds, to my niece Pattie Hunlock fifty pouuds and 
to all his children five pounds apiece, to be bought in plate for them. My 
cousin Bolton. Mrs. Home. The poor of Dranfield. Francis Bamton 
My cousin John Hunlock in Ireland. Hale, 117. 

Francis Hunlocke citizen and painter stainer of London, 9 August 
1679, proved 25 August 1679. To be buried in the parish church of All 
Hallows the Wall, London, and the expenses thereof not to exceed twenty 
or thirty pounds. To my son George twenty shillings to buy him a ring to 
wear in remembrance of me, having already fully advanced him and given 
him a sufficient portion and share out of my estate. To my two other sons, 
Francis and Edward, fifty pounds apiece as an augmentation to what por- 
tions I have already given unto them. To my eldest daughter Martha two 
hundred and fifty pounds, to my second daughter Sarah two hundred pounds 
and to my other daughter Penelope two hundred pounds, to Sara and Pene- 
lope at one and twenty or days of marriage My cousin Isabella Bolton. 
My brother Lionel Revell. My brother Edward Osboldston. My daugh- 
ter the widow Hunlocke. My two grandchildren Francis and Katherine 
Hunlocke. My wife Martha. When the debts and estate in Ireland given 
by my late brother Denham Hunlocke deceased shall be recovered and 
received the same shall be disposed as followeth, viz' one moiety or half 
part to my wife Martha and the other half to my five children Francis, 
Edward, Martha, Sara and Penelope, deducting the legacies given by my 
said brother Denham, viz' fifty pounds to my late grandchild Denham 
Hunlocke who being now deceased, I give the same to my grandson 
Francis; and fifty pounds given by my said late brother to my eldest 
daughter Martha. I do also give to Sabella the wife of my son George 
twenty shillings and unto my cousin Sir Henry Hunloke twenty shillings 
to buy them rings. King, 107. 

Martha Hunlocke of Clapham, Surrey, widow, 17 April 1 690, proved 
22 January 1690. To my son George Hunlocke five pounds and also five 



1046 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 






pounds more given me for him by his uncle Edward Osboldstone, and I 
give also to his wife three pounds, all (thirteen pounds) to be deducted out 
of the seventy-three pounds he oweth me upon his bond. To my son Fran- 
cis Hunlocke, in consideration of twenty pounds given him by his uncle 
Edward Osboldstone, the sum of sixty pounds, being the remainder of the 
money due to me by the said bond. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my son Edward Hunlocke in New Eng- 
land, in the parts beyond the seas, all such debts and sums of money as 
shall be at the time of my decease owing to me by any person or persons 
in New England &c. To my daughter Martha all the remainder of the 
money due to me by bond from Mr. John Catcher. To my grand daughter 
Katherine Hunlocke fifteen pounds and twenty five pounds which was given 
her by her uncle the said Edward Osboldstone, to be paid to her at the age 
of one and twenty years or day of marriage. To my daughter Sarah, late 
wife of Gershon Pettit deceased, the goods of mine in her possession &c. 
and to her two children George and Sarah Pettit five pounds apiece. To 
my daughter Penelope the goods of mine now in her possession. Refer- 
ence to lease of shop &c. in the Royal Exchange to Mrs. Mary Stalman of 
London, widow, &c. Vere, 8. 

[These Hunlockes so evidently belonged to the family of that name settled 
at Wingerworth, Derbyshire, that it has seemed worth the while to add the fol- 
lowing notes of wills relating to that family. H. F. W.] 

Raphe Clarke of Chesterfield in the Co. of Derby, 3 November 8th 
of James, proved 7 February 1610. To wife Constance the yearly rent of 
thirty pounds to be issuing out of all my farm holds &c. within the said 
County and one hundred pounds in money. To my son Edward ten hun- 
dred pounds. To my daughter Bridget, now wife of John Willenhall, one 
hundred pounds upon condition that the said John and Bridget shall seal 
and deliver to my executors a general acquittance for the same. To my 
son Godfrey five hundred pounds upon like condition. To my son Thomas 
five hundred pounds upon like condition. To my sister Frauucys ten 
pounds. To my sister Elizabeth Greaves, wife of Richard Greaves, twenty 
pounds. I give and release unto Richard Greaves my brother in law three 
pounds fifteen shillings and two pence which he oweth unto me of an old 

debt which I paid unto Hey ward of Brampton for him. To my cousin 

Thomas Gibson forty shillings, desiring him to continue his carefulness in 
tue teaching and correcting of such my children as shall be sent unto him 
to be taught. To the corporation of the town of Chesterfield fifty six shil- 
lings which they owe me. Towards the repairing of the pavements six 
shillings eight pence. Also I have in my hands three pounds six shillings 
eight pence which my cousin Thomas Clarke gave the Corporation. This 
to be paid and discharged. Gifts to M r George Tuke the preacher and 
Mr. Gamull the vicar, to my cousins Gilbert Clarke and Nicholas Clarke 
and William Newsom. I will that my cousin Godfrey Clarke and Henry 
Hunlocke will take into their hands the portion of my son Edward and put 
it forth to his best benefit and behoof. I will and request my said cousins 
Godfrey Clarke and Henry Hunlocke will carefully provide for the main- 
tenance, keeping and bringing up in the fear of God my sons Raphe and 
Edward. To my son Raphe all my lands &c. Reference to cousin Thomas 
Clarke lately deceased. I make my loving cousins Godfrey Clarke of 
Somersall gen* Henry Hunlocke the younger of Wiugerworthe gen' and my 
son Raphe my executors. Wood, 15. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1047 

HENRY HUNLOCKE the elder of Wiugerworth, Derby, gentleman, 15 
July 1<*1<>. proved 1 February 1612. To be buried in t lie chancel of the 
parish church of Wiugerworth, by Margaret iny first and clear loving wife. 
To Edith my now wife my interest in the lease of the parsonage of Eaton 
in full extinguishment of all her right, title, interest &c. of all my goods &c. ; 
but mv sou Henry shall have and enjoy the rents &c. until the feast of St. 
Martin the Bishop in winter which shall be in the year of our Lord God 
1611. I give and bequeath unto John Hunlocke, Denham Hunlocke and 
Thomas Hunlocke, the three sons of my cousin Thomas Hunlocke, twenty 
nobles apiece. To Heury Bywaters children, which he now hath by my 
cousin Alice, twenty shillings apiece. To John Boare his sou, which he 
hath by my cousin Margaret, twenty shillings. To Richard Wharton his 
three children, which he hath by Catherine his now wife, twenty shillings 
apiece. To my cousin Raphe Crich his children twenty shillings apiece. 
To Christopher Hunlocke and to Edward Hunlocke, sons of my brother 
Christopher Hunlocke, twenty shillings apiece. To Isabel 1 Dakyn her two 
children twenty shillings apiece. To Rose Hopkinsons daughter twenty 
shillings. To Thomas Caltons children, which he had by Grace Northedge, 
twenty shillings apiece. To Francis Brayelsford his children, which he 
had by Elizabeth Northedge, twenty shillings apiece. To my loving son 
Mr. William Benedicke forty shillings to buy him a ring for a remembrance. 
To my daughter Ann Benedicke twenty pounds, at one and twenty years 
of age. To my son Henry Felles twenty pounds at one and twenty. Eli- 
zabeth Willy of Chesterfield, widow. My brother Mr. Anthony Bradshawe 
his children. My cousin Exuperius Bradshaw. My cousin Raph Clarke. 
Rosamond, Elizabeth and Anne Markeham, three of my wife's daughters. 
Bedding my wife brought from Eaton. My son Henry to be executor and 
my brothers in law Mr. Godfrey Clarke and Master Anthony Bradshawe 
overseers. Capell, 20. 

Richard Aluet of Corber, Derby, yeoman, 22 July 1635, proved 8 
December 1639. To my daughter Anne Hunlocke of Wiugerworth and 
her children three pounds. My grandchildren Richard Blyth and Sarah 
Tailor. John Bate and my daughter Mary his wife and their children, 
being my grandchildren (to be paid them at Wingerworth). Robert Clay- 
ton of Kinder and my daughter Margaret his wife. John and Robert Bar- 
ber the sons of Francis Barber deceased and of Margaret my said daughter. 
Edward Aluey my brother. Others. My daughter Anne Hunlock and 
Henry Hunlocke Esq. her son, to be joint executors. (Signed Richard 
Alvey.) Lee, 183. 

Schedula testamentaria Dni Henrici Hunlock militis. He devises an 
annuity or rent charge out of all his lauds, after his death, to his lady for 
life of four hundred pounds per annum : that the feoffees shall stand seized 
of the remainder of his lands and receive the profits thereof during the 
minority of his sou towards the education and raising of portions for his 
younger children and payment of his debts. The overplus to be divided 
amongst the children &c. 

Afterwards he is referred to as Sir Henry Hunlocke, knight and Baronet. 
From a Sententia which follows it appears that the name of his widow was 
Dame Marina Hunlocke. 30 May 1642. Fairfax, 66. 

William Michell of Wingarworth, Darby, Esq. 21 May 1662, proved 
23 July 1663. My daughter Marina Michell and such child or children as 



1048 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

my wife hath now conceived. My daughter in law Marina Huulocke. My 
son in law Windsor Hunlocke. Sir Henry Huulocke, Baronet. My wife 
Dame Marina Hunlocke. My brother Francis Michell. My sister Mary 
Michell. Juxon, 98. 

Will of Christopher Hunlocke, made in Broach 3 July 1662, proved 
3 September 1663. My father Christopher Huulock to be executor, he to 
pay unto Bhungee Hirgemoody his son my debt unto him, being Rupees 
twenty six &c. Juxon, 114. 

[Pedigrees of the Hunlock or Hunlocke familv of "Wingerworth mav be 
found in Harl. MSS. 1093, 1153, 1486, 1537 and 21Gl\ Add. MSS. 6670 and 6674 
and Egerton MS. 996. They differ so much as to be rather unsatisfactory. The 
pedigree given in Harl. MS. 1153 shows that Christopher, brother of the first 
Henry (who was buried at Wingerworth 20 October 1612 and whose will I have 
noted) had sons Thomas, Philip, Nicholas, Henry, Edward and Christopher. 
Of these Thomas married Judith daughter of William Denham of London, aud 
had issue John, Denham and Thomas Hunlock. No Francis is given, aud this 
statement is confirmed by the will of Henry Hunlocke the elder (just referred 
to) who in 1610 speaks of John, Denham and Thomas as the three sons of " my 
cousin Thomas Hunlocke." As the Heralds' Visitation was made in 1611, the 
year after the date of that will, I would suggest that Francis Huulocke, the 
painter stainer of London, though probably a brother of John, Denham and 
Thomas, was not born until after that pedigree was entered. H. F. W.] 

Rose Beawe widow, late the wife of Richard Beawe of London, gen' 
deceased, her will made 30 April 1579, proved 17 June 1579. I give and 
bequeath unto the children of my daughter Oliff Bnlkley, now wife unto 
Mr. Edward Bulkley, clerk, Doctor of Divinity and Preacher at Odell in 
Bedfordshire, fifty pounds of mine now being in the hands and custody of 
my brother Dr. Overton, which fifty pounds, with the profits thereof for 
two years ended at the Feast of All Saints last j)ast Anno Dni 1578, I will 
shall be equally divided by my executor after my death unto the children 
of my said daughter Oliff Bulkley. Provision against death of any of 
these children before marriage or coming to the age of eighteen years. To 
my daughter Pheabe all my goods, household stuff, apparell, linen and bed- 
ding which I now have and do occupy at this present about me, which I 
will shall be after my death, in convenient time, delivered by my executor 
unto my said daughter Pheabe if she be then living and a widow ; and if 
she then continue and live with Thomas Kiddall, her husband, I will then 
the same goods &c. shall be delivered unto her sister Oliff Bulkley. safely 
to keep to the use of her sister Pheabe until she do overlive her said hus- 
band, if God will so permit. If she die before her husband then my daugh- 
ter Oliff shall keep them to her own use. 

I make and ordain my executor my very good and approved friend Mr. 
William Le Gris Esq. for whose care, pains pud travail which I am well 
assured he will take in the accomplishing of this my present testament and 
last will I do give and set over unto him and to his youngest daughter Mis. 
Ambrosia Le Gris one bond or statute of three score pounds which was set 
over unto me for a good debt by Walter Buckland gen 1 , now living, in part 
payment of two hundred pounds which the said Walter gave unto me for 
redeeming of my thirds which I then had out of his lands in Somersetshire 
and Wiltshire, which he now enjoyeth and hath as next heir unto Richard 
Buckland his father deceased, sometime my husband, which statute I now 
have in my keeping, the moiety of which, after it be recovered, I will shall 
be delivered aud paid unto the said Mrs. Ambrosia Le Gris at the day of 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1010 

her marriage or at her age of eighteen &c, or if she die &c. then equally to 
her sister Mrs. Jane Le Gris, towards the advancement of her marriage, 
and her eldest brother Mr. Henry Le Gris, towards the maintenance of 
him in his study at Cambridge. Bakon, 25. 

[The mention of Bucklands in the foregoing will led me to look up that name 
a little. I found (amoug others) the following wills.] 

Richard Buckland of Clerkenwell, Middlesex, Esq., 24 August 1558, 
proved 12 October 1558. To be buried in the parish church of Clerken- 
well as nigh unto the grave where the body of Mary my wife lieth buried 
as may conveniently be. To the high altar of the said church. To the 
high altar of Westham for my tithes forgotten. The poor of Shepton Mal- 
lett in the Co. of Somerset whereas I was born. To Roose my wife two 
hundred pounds and all such implements and household stuff as were her 
own proper goods at the time of the spousals and marriage had and solemn- 
ized between her and me (and other bequests). My mansion house at 
Clerkenwell. My children Richard and Margaret Buckland. The said 
Rose my wife shall have and enjoy the third part and portion of my manor 
of Shipton Mallett for term of her life natural as in full recompence of her 
dowry that she may claim &c. To my son Mathie Buckland and his heirs 
male all my manors of Melston ah Bagmerston ah Brightfnston in Wilts 
&c. &c. and my manor of Shipton Mallett &c. which I have charged for my 
wife's dowry. My son Walter Bucklaude. My house at Westham, Essex. 
Mathie Buckland my son and heir apparent and also my sole executor. My 
sister Alice Bithisie. To daughter Bridget Buckland a cross of gold that 
her mother gave her &c, she not to affye, marry and take to husband one 
Wdliam Overtou or Anthony Overton or any other of their brothers, being 
the sons of Goodlake Overton, late of St. John's Street, gentleman deceased. 
To daughter Margaret Bucklande the beads of gold that were her 
mother's &c. 

Item, I give and bequeath to either of Peter Kellam Erbye and Edward 
Irby, my wife's children, a black gown. My brother John Cordell and my 
brother John Overton and their wives. Thomas, my innocent or fool in 
my kitchen. My cousin Joanne Bull. I give the custody and wardship of 
Kellam Erbye to Rose my wife. My cousin John Buckland. My cousin 
William Bull and his wife. William Kympton. Noodes, 55. 

Matthew Buckland, 2 April 1559, proved 11 April 1559. To be 
buried in the choir of St. Dunstan's church within Temple Bar. I make 
my brother Walter Buckland my executor. My brother Master Jones and 
his wife. Master Kempton and his wife. My sister Bridget and my sister 
Margaret. Thomas, an inuocent in my father's kitchen. Money that my 
father gave to him in his last will. John Buckland. I give to Walter 
Buckland my manor which lieth in Shepton Mallett in Somersetshire and 
my manor of Brickfnstone alias Melstone. My sister Elayn Jones. My 
cousiu John Buckland. To brother Walter all my houses at Clarkeuwell. 

Chaynay, 4. 

[It seems evident that Mrs. Bulkley -was not a daughter of Richard Buckland. 
While hunting up the Bucklands I had also looked for the name Overton, on the 
assumption that Mrs. Rose Buckland aU Beawe belonged to a family of that 
name. Among the wills which I found was the following, which I have no 
doubt is the will of Mrs. Bulkley's maternal grandmother and godmother. 
There still remains to look up the Erbye or Irby connection. — H. F. W.] 



1050 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Oltve Overton, widow, 19 December 1545, proved 7 June 1540. My 
body to be buried within the parish church of Clerkenwell. To my daugh- 
ter Katherine forty pounds, parcel of such money as my son Cordall oweth 
me by his bill. To my daughter Rose twenty pounds, to be also delivered 
to her by my said son John Cordall of the same money. To my daughter 
Martha twenty pounds, to be delivered to her likewise by my said son Cor- 
dall, at the day of her marriage, of the same money. My three daughters 
Katherine, Mary and Martha shall have all ray household stuff, hangings of 
my house excepted, which I give to my said son Cordall and Isabell to be 
indifferently divided between them, and to be dolivered to them at the day 
of their marriage. I give to every of my sons, except Edward my son, a 
feather bed, a coverlet and a pair of sheets, my son John to have the choice. 
To my daughter Mary the six pounds that William Dennye oweth me, as 
appeareth by his bill, to be delivered at the day of her marriage. I give, 
also, and bequeath unto my son Cordall and to Isabell his wife (sic) mine 
lease and interest of my house in St. John's street &c. upon this condition 
that my son Cordall make a sufficient estate in the Law of and in the said 
tenement to the use of Martha, my daughter, to have and enjoy the same 
to her and to her heirs of her body lawfully begotten, after the decease of 
my said son Cordall and Issabell his wife. And if it fortune the said Martha 
to decease without heirs of her body &c. then my son John Overton to have 
the same> to him, his heirs and assigns forever. Certain sums towards the 
finding of my three children at school, viz. William, Clement aud Harry. 
I give and bequeath unto my daughter Rose a vestment, with the apparell, 
and a chalice of silver. To my daughter Martha my tablet of gold and a 
standing cup all gilt that remaineth in the hands of my Lady St. John, to 
have the same at the years of fourteen. If she decease before that time 
the said tablet and cup to remain to my daughters Katherine and Issabell. 
Martha to have, at the same age, the chain of gold tliat remaineth in the 
hands of my son Edward, he to keep it till then. Mine executors to be my 
son Edward, Isabell Cordall and Katherine my daughters. My said son in 
law John Cordall to be overseer. These being witness, my son John Over- 
ton, Mary my daughter and other. 

Proved, as above, by Isabell Coradall, power reserved to grant probate 
to Edward Overton and Katherine Overton. Alen, 11. 

Daniel Wyld sometimes of Brewerton parish in York County in Vir- 
ginia, plauter, now resident in the parish of Stepney, Middlesex, 2 Sep- 
tember 1676, proved 25 October 1676. To my loving daughter Margaret 
the wife of John Martin of Ratclyff, Middlesex, mariner, all those my 
plantations, being two of them, the one situate at the head of the Mill 
swamp, at the head of Queen's Creek, in the said parish of Brewerton, 
and the other upon the North side of the said creek, about two miles below 
the other, as the same are by Patent confirmed unto me and set out with 
their respective buttings and boundings, together with all houses &c. and 
all such negro slaves, servants, goods &c. appertaining &c. My said son in 
law John Martin to have the improvement and benefit of the said planta- 
tion during the life of my said daughter and to continue and keep upon the 
estate as good a stock of negroes &c. as now is, and if he die before my 
said daughter that he leave unto her out of his own personal estate so much 
as he hath received and advanced himself by the profits of the said planta- 
tions. And for further confirmation I give and bequeath the said planta- 
tions to my said daughter and to the heirs of her body for ever, and, for 
want of such issue, to my said sou John Martin and the heirs of his body law- 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1051 

fully begotten and. for want of such heirs of my said son and daughter and 
the survivor of them &c. I give, bequeath &c. the lands and houses (but 
not the negroes, servants and stock) unto my loving kinsman Mr. Nicholas 
Harrison of London, tinman, to be equally divided betwixt him and his 
children. To the poor of the parish of St. Andrew in Worcester five 
pounds. To my servant and apprentice Valentine Harvey, now upon my 
plantation in Virginia, one young " ffilley " mare of a year old (and other 
legacies to him). To Mr Robert Rowe of Ratcliff, tobacconist, and to his 
wife ten shillings apiece to buy them rings to wsar in remembrance of me. 
I give unto Captain Richard Martin of Wappiug and unto his wife ten 
shillings apiece to buy them rings to wear in remembrance of me. Similar 
bequests to Mr. Henry Dennis and Sarah his wife and to my said cousin 
Mr. Nicholas Harrison and his wife and to John Martin of Wapping, scriv- 
euor. To my loving sister Mrs. Margaret Chichley of London, widow, thirty 
shillings (for a ring). My said son in law John Martin and Margaret his 
wife to be joint executor and executrix. 

Wit: Henry Dennis, John Marten Not 17 pub: 

Proved, as above, by Margaret Martin, power reserved for John Martin. 

Commission issued 1 December 1G91 to Mary Williams the lawfully 
assigned guardian of Margaret Martin, minor daughter (natural and legiti- 
mate) and also the only issue of John and Margaret Martin, deceased, 
while they lived executors named in the will of Daniel Wyld, lately of the 
parish of Brewerton in the County of York in the parts of Virginia, 
deceased, to administer, according to the tenor of the said will and during 
the miuorhy and for the use and benefit of the said minor, the goods &c. 
not fully administered by the said Margaret, one of the executors (now 
deceased), John Martin, the other executor having died before he had 
taken upon himself the burden of execution. Bence, 133. 

Moses Chaplen of the parish of St. Mary's in Guildford, Surrey, 
merchant, 7 June 1669, proved 23 August 1669. To my loving brother 
William Chaplen of Ottery St. Mary's, Devonshire, gen 1 , five pounds. The 
same to loving sister Mary Hutchins and loving sister Abigail Hurd. To 
cousin Edward, sister's son, fifty pounds. The same to cousin Mary Hurd, 
my sister's daughter, and to cousin Mary Butler. 

Item, I give and bequeath to my loving cousin Ester Peirce, senior, of 
New England fifteen pounds of good and lawful money of New England, 
to be paid within one year after my decease in New England money. I 
do make and ordain my dear and kind and loving father and mother Moses 
Chaplen and Collett Chaplen of Ottery S*. Mary's in Devonshire, gen 1 ., 
joint executors &c, to whom I give and bequeath all my lands and tene- 
ments, goods and chatties whatsoever within the Kingdom of England and 
all whatsoever I have in any place beyond the seas. And I do make choice 
of and desire my well beloved friends Mr Thomas Bodley of London, mer- 
chant, and Mr Francis Parson of London, gen 1 ., to be my overseers &c. ; 
and I do desire them to receive all what shall come from New England 
upon my account and also all what shall come from Jameca, and first pay 
my debts and then return the remainder to my dear father, and for your 
care and trouble therein I do give each of you ten pounds apiece, to receive 
within one year after my decease. Wit: Thomas Smith, Susanna Stanton, 
Will: Tisbury jun r . Proved by Moses Chaplen the father and Collett 
Chaplen the mother of the deceased, the executors named in his will. 

Coke, 93. 



1052 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Sarah TnoMAS, the wife of Richard Thomas of London, merchant, 7 
August 1711, proved 2 October 1711. All my worldly goods &c. to my 
beloved husband, he to pay all my just debts and, out of the overplus, if be 
any, to pay Richard Keate, shipwright, now resident in New England, the 
sum of ten pounds ; and the remainder &c. I give to my husband whom I 
do nominate &c. sole executor. Young, 222. 

Richard Carye the younger, draper, dwelling upon the " backe " in 
St. Nicholas parish, Bristol, 8 August 1569, proved 17 September 1569. To 
my father Mr. William Carye the elder, every year so long as he liveth, ten 
pounds, payable quarterly, and all such sums as I owe unto him and which 
my brother in law John Lacye stands bound for the payment &c. To my 
said brother in law forty pounds. To my brother in law Thomas Deconsou 
fifty pounds. To wife Elizabeth three hundred pounds and plate and 
household stuff, saving my counting chests containing my writings and my 
shops and shop books and debts. To my brother Richard Carie's twelve 
children five pounds apiece, at twenty one or day of marriage. If any of 
them die before &c. then such portion to be equally divided amongst the 
longest livers of my said brother's children by his first wife, viz'. Richard, 
William, Lettice, Agnes, Frances, Mary and Elizabeth. To my sister 
Deconson's children, namely, William Cowper, Giles Cowper, Judith and 
Johan, five pounds apiece. To my sister Lacye's children, namely, Jonas, 
Thomas, Tobey, Christopher and Susanna, five pounds apiece. To my 
brother William Carie's two children, that is, to William Carye and Anne, 
ten pounds apiece. To Mary Butler, my wife's sister, five pounds. To 
William Rice, Shearman, five pounds. My two servants John Walker and 
Alice Jones. Christopher Pacye, preacher. John Northbroke, preacher. 
My father, my brother Richard and I stand bound to Mr Thomas Longe of 
Beckington. Brothers Richard and William to settle it. They to be joint 
executors. And I will and most heartily desire Mr Robert Saxcye, Alder- 
man, and Robert Halton, Chamberlain of the City, to be mine overseers. 

Sheffeld, 20. 

Richard Cart the elder of Bristol, merchant, 11 June 1570, proved 
3 November 1570. My body to be buried in St. Nicholas " Crowde." To 
Richard Carye, my eldest son, ten pounds. To my son William twenty 
pounds. To my daughter Anne Carye ten pounds. To my daughter 
Frances ten pounds. The same to daughters Elizabeth and Mary Carye. 
To my father William Carye four hundred pounds, which is a debt that; I 
owe unto him. To my daughter Lettyce Mellen five pounds. Wife 
Johan, mine executrix, shall redeem all my lands &c. that be in mortgage 
and have the profits, issues &c. as well as of all other my lands &c, to the 
use of my said wife and my six last children of her body begotten &c. for 
nineteen years after my decease. And after her decease and the expiration 
of the said term I will and devise all my lands &c. in fee simple to Chris- 
topher my son, remainder to Richard, my eldest son. The residue of my 
goods, one third to wife Johan, the rest to said six children. I make 
my brother William Carve and my brother Robert Halton my overseers. 
Witnesses Robert Halton and Christopher Pacey, Prebendary of the Cathe- 
dral Church of Bristol. Lyon, 31. 

William Carie the elder, dwelling upon the "backe" in St. Nicholas 
parish of the City of Bristol, 2 April 1571, proved 10 June 1572. My 
body to be buried in the " Crowde " of St. Nicholas according to the religious 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1053 

custom of christians. I will a sermon to be preached at my burial and the 
preacher to have for his pains six shillings eight pence. To my son William 
Carve thirteen pounds six shillings eight pence. To his daughter Anne 
six pounds thirteen shillings four pence, to be paid at twenty one or day of 
marriage; but it' she die before the appointed time the said portion to 
return and remain in her said father's hands to his only profit and use. To 
my sou in law John Lacie ten pounds. To Richard Cane, William Carye, 
Lettice, Frances and Elizabeth, the children of my eldest son Richard 
Carve by his first wife, six pounds thirteen shillings four pence apiece. To 
Mary Carve, one of the daughters of the said Richard, thirteen pounds 
six shillings eight pence. The said sums to be delivered to every of the 
said children at twenty one years of age or at day of marriage. To my 
son Richard Carie's children by his last wife forty shillings apiece, at age 
of discretion or day of marriage. To my son in law Thomas Dyckinson 
all the rest of my goods &e and he to be sole executor. Also I will and 
most earnestlv desire M r . Robert Saxie, alderman, and Mr Robert Holton, 
Chamberlain of the City, to be mine overseers. To Anues Chiles my kins- 
woman five pounds. Christopher Pacye, preacher, one of the witnesses. 

Daper, 19. 
Commission of administration de bonis non was granted to Richard 
Smith of Bristol, draper, "20 April 1586, Thomas Dickenson, the executor 
having died before fully completing his trust. Probate Act Book, 1586. 

William Carte of Loudon, cloth worker, 2 March 1572, proved 13 
March 1572. My body to be buried in the parish church where I now 
dwell. After my debts paid I wholly give to Elizabeth my wife all the 
residue of my goods &c, she to have the ordering and disposing of all my 
goods at her good discretion. And I make and ordain her my sole a^d 
only executrix. And where my father gave me by his last will twenty 
marks* of lawful money of England I give the same to my said wife and 
full power and authority to receive and take the same to her only use. 

Wit: William Smith, haberdasher, and John Hill. Peter, 9. 

Christopher Cart of the City of Bristol, merchant, of the parish of 
St. Stephen's, 30 October 1615, proved 31 May 1626. To Christopher, 
my eldest son, fifty pounds at twenty one, and the same to son William. 
To my daughter Susanne Cary one hundred and fifty pounds, that is to say, 
one hundred pounds in lawful English money and fifty pounds value in 
plate and household stuff, when she shall accomplish the full age of twenty 
and one years or at her day of marriage. To my daughter Bridget Cary 
one hundred pounds at twenty one or day of marriage. Similar bequests 
to daughters Sible Cary and Lettice Cary. My said six children. My 
will is that Lettice my wife shall, by the advice and direction of my loving 
brother John Young, gen 1 ., and my loving friend John Barker, merchant, 
make sale in fee simple of one messuage or tenement, with the appurte- 
nances, situate upon the ' ; Kaye of Bristowe," in the tenure &c. of John 
Purnell joiner, and also of a messuage &c. in Broad Street in the tenure of 

of Mrs. Ellis, widow, and of a messuage &c. with thirty acres of 

land in Abbotts Leigh, now or late in the several occupations of Walter 
Cope and the widow of John Durban, lately deceased. To my daughter 
Francis, the wife of James Oliver, five pounds in one year after my decease. 

* Twenty marks would be thirteen pounds six shillings eight pence, the very sum 
William Carye the elder of Bristol gives to his son William by will (q. v.) 

H- F. Waters. 



1054 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

I devise and bequeath the profits, use and occupation of all my lauds, tene- 
ments &o. (excepting the messuages &c. before appointed to be sold) to 
Lettice my wife during her natural life, for the better education of my 
children unmarried, and after her decease I give to my eldest sou, Christo- 
pher Cary, my messuage situate upon the " Barke " [Back?] of " Bristowe," 
now or late in the occupation of John Langton, merchant, and one other 
messuage upon the said " barke," now in the occupation of Robert Elliott, 
draper, and an orchard and garden ground, with two little lodges, situate 
upon Stony Hill, now in my own occupation, and a garden ground, with a 
lodge in the same, in the parish of St. Phillip's, now in the occupation of 
Frances Eaton, house carpenter. To my son William, after my ^wife's 
decease, the messuage &c. wherein I now dwell, situate upon the " Key of 
Bristowe," and another messuage next adjoining, in the occupation of 
Thomas Donninge turner, and another messuage &c, adjoining to my said 
dwellinghouse, now in the occupation of John Sharpe, mariner. And if 
my said sons die without issue of their bodies lawfully begotten then my 
will is that the messuages and tenements to them devised shall he and 
remain to all my daughters and their heirs lawfully begotten. All the rest 
of my goods &c. I give and bequeath to Lettice my wife, whom I make 
my full and sole executrix. And I make my brother John Younge and 
my loving and kind friend Mr John Barker my overseers, to whom I give 
for their pains twenty shillings apiece. 

Thomas Duniug a witness. Hele, 60. 

Francis Bannister of Bristol, draper, 16 May 1625, proved 10 June 
1625. My body to be laid in the parish church or churchyard of All Saints 
in Bristol. The poor of All Saints (at the discretion of Mr. Towgood) and 
of St. John Baptist parish wherein I dwell. The poor of Wellington 
where I was boru (to be distributed at the discretion of my loving father 
Allen Bannester and of my loving brother Walter Banister). To my lov- 
ing father Allen Banister and my dear mother Elner Banister, in token of 
my duty and love to them, thirty pounds, which is to be paid them the five 
and twenty of July next in Shrewsbury by Mr George Wright draper. 
To my loving brother Walter Banister, Mr. Perkins' works in three vol- 
umes, my gold ring &c. &c, and to his three children, my cousins, John, 
Nathaniel and Mary Banister, forty shillings apiece when they come to the 
age of fourteen years. 

Item, I give and bequeath to my loving "mother in lawes." Lettice 
Carye of Bristol, forty shillings to buy her a ring and to my brother in laws 
Christopher Cary my best cloth cloak of all and to my brother in laws 
William Cary my third best suit &c. and forty shillings of money, to be 
paid him at the age of one and twenty years. To my four loving sister in 
laws, Francis Oliver, Bridget Shute, Sible Burnell and Lettice Cary, thirty 
shillings apiece. To my trusty and loving partners, drapers of Shrews- 
bury, Richard Hunt, George Wright, John Bradly, George Hunt, forty 
shillings apiece, to buy each of them a ring, and to my loving partners 
Thomas Knight, John Prowde, John Gardiner, and Adam Webbe, Henry 
Smyth, and Richard Shutt, drapers, twenty shillings apiece &c. To my son 
Samuel Banister three hundred pounds, at one and twenty, and my loving 
wife Susan shall have the keeping and training up of my said son. To my 
loving aunt Bridget Taylor for twenty shillings, to buy her a bible. Friend 
Anne Lewis, widow, and good friend* Mr Towgood. Wife Susan to be sole 
executrix and loving friends William Yeoman, minister, and brother Walter 
Banister to be overseers. Clarke, 67. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1055 

Robert Cary of Bristol, draper, 11 August 1G28, proved 7 October 
1628. To my da-'ghter Moulde (besides the ten pouuds given to her by 
her grandmother) sixteen pounds thirteen shillings four pence, to be paid 
her when she shall fully have expired the age of eighteen years. To ray 
daughter Lettice (besides the ten pounds given her by her grandmother) 
the same amount. Similar bequest to daughter Mary. To son William 
twenty live pouuds at twenty four. The same to son Thomas. Wife 
Anne to be sole executrix and loving friends Mr. William Thomas my 
uncle and my brother Richard Cary to be overseers. 

Wit: Alice Cary, Mary the wife of Richard Cary and Richard Cary. 

Barrington, 90. 

Walter Carey of Bristol, woollen draper, 28 September 1633, proved 
18 February 1633. I do bequeath all my children unto Grace my wife, 
their mother, to take care of them and to instruct them and to breed them in 
the knowledge and fear of God and to do her best to provide portions for 
them according as hereafter God shall enable her. And the cause where- 
fore I do leave my children wholly to my wife's disposing and that I do not 
give them portions myself is because I would thereby tie and bind them the 
more to be loving and dutiful to their tender and careful mother. I give 
my said wife all my money and goods whatsoever and make her my whole 
and sole executrix and I do appoint my two loving brother in laws Mr 
William Browne and Mr Thomas Browne, to be my overseers. 

Seager, 12. 

Henry Hobson of Bristol, innholder, 16 March 1634, proved 27 May 
1636. To be buried in the church of All Saints in Bristol, where I now 
live, near the place where my late wife Alice lieth buried. I do ratify and 
confirm a deed of uses, bearing date 10 March 5 th Charles, between me 
and Myles Jackson of Bristol, merchant, and Godfrey Creswicke of Bristol, 
hardwareman. I give and bequeath unto my grandchildren, Henry Cary, 
Matthew Cary, Richard Cary and Myles Cary, children of my daughter 
Alice Cary, wife of John Cary draper, five pounds apiece and to my grand- 
children Thomas and Henry Jackson, children of my daughter Anue 
Jackson, widow, five pounds apiece. To my grandchildren Alice Cary, 
Honor Cary and Mary Cary, daughters of my said daughter Alice 
Cary, one hundred pounds apiece and to my grandchildren Margaret 
and Anne Jackson, daughters of my said daughter Anne Jackson, one hun- 
dred pounds apiece. My kinsman and servant Richard Burrowes. My 
kinsman Christopher Raynoldes, son of George Reynoldes deceased, and 
Anne Heynoldes, sister of the said Christopher (at twenty one or day of 
marriage). The Company of Innholders of Bristol. To my son William 
Hobson my scarlet gown. To my well beloved kinsmen Francis Creswicke, 
merchant, and Thomas Hobson, pewterer, the lease of the messuage in 
St. Nicholas Street. Bristol, wherein Arthur Stert now dwelleth, in trust 
for the only use and behoof of my said daughter Alice Cary. To my said 
daughter Anne Jackson my wine license which I bought of Hugh Hart to 
draw wine by in Bristol &c. and the lease of the messuage in St. Nicholas 
Street wherein Philip Love, merchant, now dwelleth. Son William to be 
executor and said kinsmen Francis Creswicke aud Thomas Hobson to be 
overseers. 1 do also give unto ray old servant Edward Drabble, whom I 
had almost forgot, forty shillings in money. Pile, 52. 

Alice Cary of Shadwell in the parish of Stebunheath, otherwise Step- 
ney, Middlesex, spinster, 24 April 1660, proved 14 November 1660. I 



1056 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS LN ENGLAND. 

2ive and bequeath unto my grandfather John Cary of Bristol, woollen 
draper, the full and just sum of one shilling of lawiull money of England 
and to my uncle Myle<* Cary of Virginia the like sum of one shilling &c. 
and to my cousin William Hopsou the like sum of one shilling. I give to 
the poor, fatherless children of Stepney twenty shillings to be distributed 
amongst them by my executor within one quarter of a year next after my 
decease. To every one of my nearest of kindred twelve pence apiece. 
All the rest I do give and bequeath unto my loving uncle Richard Cary 
and his loving wife my aunt Dorothy Cary and I make them joint execu- 
tors &c. Nabbs, 206. 

William Cary citizen aud haberdasher of London, of the parish of St. 
Stephens Coleman Street, 28 January 1664, proved 13 February 1664. I give 
and bequeath unto Susanna Cary, my dear aud loving wife eleven hundred 
pounds and all my plate, jewels, bracelets, rings and watches. To William, 
my eldest son, five hundred pounds, at one and twenty. To son Richard six 
hundred pounds at one and twenty. The same to son Samuel. To daughter 
Damaris Cary six hundred pounds, at eighteen or day of marriage. The 
same to daughter Susanna Cary. Provision in case of death of " any of 
my five children." Wife to bring them up. I give her all the rents &c. 
of my three houses situate upon the Key in Bristol, one of which is now 
or late in the occupation of Thomas Eston, merchant, aad the other two 
now or late in the occupation of Thomas Donning, turner, during her 
natural life, and after her decease I give the said three houses to my eldest 
son William, with remainder to Richard, then to Samuel and lastly to all 
my children surviving. I give to my three sons all my books. I give to 
my brother ( hristopher Cary of Bristol all the moneys he oweth me on a 
bill and a bond provided he pays to my executrix forty pounds within one 
year after my decease. I do give him besides forty shillings as a token of 
my love. I give to my four sisters, Susanna Dale, Bridget Stephens, 
Sybilla Miller and Lettice Powell, forty shillings apiece. The poor of 
Boulton in the Moors, Lancashire. My mothers in law Mrs. Isahel Cornish 
and Mrs Susanna Sherer. Wife to be executrix and father in law Mr. 
Richard Sherer and uncle Mr. Thomas Young, gen 1 ., to be overseers. 

Hyde, 12. 

Richard Cary, merchant, now resident in the Island of Barbados, 12 
June 1684, entered 16 September 1684, proved 13 August 1685. My 
friends Mr Francis Wood and Mr Osbert Hougham both of St. Michael's 
in the island of Barbados, merchants. To my loving brothers William 
Cary of the City of London, silkman, and Samuel Cary of the City of 
London, merchant, and my dear and loving sister Mrs Damaris Berriff of 
the same city, widow, all the rest and remainder of my estate whatsoever 
which I die possessed of, both real and personal, let it be in England, New 
Yorke, the Island of Barbados or elsewhere, to be equally divided between 
them, or the survivors of them, share and share alike, making them jointly 
my full executors &c. 

Proved at London by the oaths of all three executors. Caun, 96. 

[This family of Cary of Bristol should interest not only New Yorkers and 
Virginians, but New Englanders also, as will appear from the following pedigree 
which I was fortunate enough to find some years ago when I went through the 
then little known genealogical MSS. contained in what are called the Stowe 
MSS. in the British Museum, to whose value and importance I called attention 
last year (see foot note on p. 257, vol. 48, of Gen. Hey-, ante, p. 861). The vol- 
umes have been re-numbered and re-paged since I examined them. The present 
reference to the following pedigree is Stowe MS. vol. 670, fo. 230.] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



1057 



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1058 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



[This pedigree (which shows a tricking of the arms of the family on the 
margin) was evidently furnished to the College of Arms, in the year 1700, by 
Richard Gary of Loudon, whom I suppose to be the second son of Shershaw 
Cary of Bristol by his first wife Mary Scrope. The names and ages of the 
children of John, Richard and Thomas I have not taken off. Of the wills 
which I have given, thor>e which directly bear on this pedigree are the wills of 
Robert (1628) and Walter (1GS3), brothers of our James Cary of New England, 
and of Henry Hobson (1636) and his great-granddaughter Alice Cary (1660), 
referring to the Virginian line. The other wills, however, seem to me to re- 
fer to the same stock, and from them I venture to construct the following 
tentative pedigree : 



William Cary= 
of St. Xicholas 
Parish, Bristol. 
Will (1572) men- 
tions kinswom- 
anAnnesChiles. 



Johan=Richard Cary (the= WilPm Cary=Elizabeth. 



2d wife, 

by 

whom 

six 

chil- 

dren. 



elder) merchant in 
St. Nicholas parish. 
Will 1570. Has 12 
chduren in 15">9. 
A brother Robert 
Holton or Halton. 
Names also a son 
Christopher. 



1st wife. 



of Loudon, 

clothworker. 

Will 1573. 

Prob. obt. 

s. p. 



I I I 

Richard Cary (dau.) 

(the younger) wife 1st of 



of St. Nicholas, 

draper. 

Will 1J69. 



Eliz'th 

had a sister 
Mary Butler. 



William, 

not named by 

grandfather. 



Anne, 
not named 
by father. 



.... Cowper, 
2d of Thoma9 
Dickenson. 

Issue by 

Cowper. 

(dau.) 

wife cf John 
Lacy. 5 
children. 



I I 

Richard. William Cary. Pro- 
bably the father of 
James Cary of New 
England, and grand- 
father of Miles Cary 
of Virginia. 



I 



I 



Lettice. Agnes. Frances. Mary. Elizabeth. 
. . . Mellen. 



I 
Christopher Cary of=Lettice Young, 
St. Stephen's parish, 
Bristol, merchant. 
(Probably a son of 
Kichard the elder by 
his 2d wife). Will 
1615, proved 1026. 



sister of 
John and Thomas 
Young. 



Five other children 



Wd 



Christopher 

Cary. 

Living Jan. 

1004-a. 



William Cary=Susanna, 



cit. and haber- 
dasher of Lon- 
don. Prob. mar. 
twice. Will, 
1664-5. 



prob. a 
dau . of 
Richard 
and Su- 
sanna 
Sherer. 



Frances, 

wife of 

James Oliver. 



Susanna, 

w. 1st of 

Francis 

Bannister, 

and 2d of 

....Dale. 



Bridget, 
mar. 1st 
. . . Shute, . 

and 2d 
. Stephens. 



I I 

Sybill, 

mar. 1st 

. Burnell, 

and 2d 

. .. -Miller. 

Lettice, 

mar. 

. . Powell. 



William Cary 
of London, 
silkman. 



I 
Richard Cary 
died in Bar- 
bados. Will 1085. 



Samuel Cary 
of London, 
merchant. 



Damaris=. 
Susanna. 



Berriff. 



Besides the Cary pedigree from the Stowe MSS. already given, I found another 
in the same volume (Stowe MS. 670, fo. 229), evidently relating to the same 
stook and also of interest through their connection with Virginia. It was con- 



structed the very same year (A.D. 1700) as the other, 
important portion of it, as follows : 



I transcribed the most 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



1059 



John Cary of the city of Bristol=Elizabeth, dan. of Hereford. 



JohnCary of H ack- 
ney in Com. Midd. 
eldest son, marr'd 
and left issue. He 
died ab't the year 
1656. 



Thomas Cary=Susanna, Philip Cary, 

■J.l sun; bapt. dau. of 3d son of 

87 Dec, 1813. Philip Lim- JohnCary 

bery of and Eliz : 

Dartmouth Hereford. 
in ( 'om. 
Devon. 



Prudence Cary, 
eldest daughter. 



Elizabeth Cary, 
2d daughter. 



Jane, dau. ofc=John Cary of theCit\— Mary, dau. of Robert Timothy Cary, Mary Cary, 

Cox of the City of Lon- 2d son, died un- 

don, 2d wife. Married died beyond married, 

30 April, 1672. Living sea, unmarried, aged about 
anno 1700. 16 years. 



Jolm Floud, 
of Virginia, 
gent. 1st 
wife. Mar- 
ried 15 June, 
1665. 



of London, merch't, 
one of the directors 
of the English Co. 
trading to the East 
Indies, and in the 
Commission of the 
Lieutenancy of the 
Citvof London ; born 
1 Feb. 1614; living 
anno 1700. 



Thomas Cary of=Esther, dau. of 
London, merch't Wm Hudson of 
eldest son, born London, gent.; 
in Virginia 22 married 5 May 
Feb. 1667, living. 1698. 



Callow Cary John Cary 



2d son, 
b. 18 Jan'y, 



living 1700. 



3d son, 
b. 3 Nov. 

1677; 
living 1700. 



Richard Cary 
4th son, 
b. 13 Oct. 

1681; 
living 1700. 



nil' 



I I 



Will'm Cary Robert Cary Mary Cary 

5th son, 

b. 6 Aug. 

16S9; 

living 1700. 



1 u ' 



Dec. 1678 
6th son, b. 

3 Aug. 1093; Elizabeth, b. 20 Aug. 1680. 
living 1700. 



Peter Cary, 

7th son, 

b. 28 Sept. 

1C94. 



Anna, b. 20 Sept. 1686. 



Jane, b. 31 March, 1690. 



Susanna, b. — Aug. 1G'.>8. 



" Anno 1700 

I do Certifie this Account of My Descent to be true and desire itt may be 
registered in the Colledge of Armes. Witness my hand 24 th day of August Anno 
D'ni 1700. John Cary." 

I have note of the will of his son Richard, made 7 June, and proved 18 June, 
1707 (Poley 137). He calls himself son of John Cary late of London, mer- 
chant, deceased, and names brothers Thomas, Callow, William, Robert and 
Peter and all his sisters, of whom Elizabeth was now Lady Eyre, and Anna 
was wife of Mr. Richard Mounteney. Callow Cary (executor) dying before 
completing his trust, admon. de bonis non was granted to Mary Cary, widow, 
mother of Callow, and adrax. of his goods. Elizabeth seems to have married 
Sir Charles Eyre, and Jane was the Avife of John Higden.— H. F. Waters.] 

"William Nicholson of Anne Arundle County (Maryland) merchant 
25 September 1719, sworn to (in Maryland) 19 October 1719, certified by 
Notary Public at Annapolis 23 November 1719, proved, at London, 5 Feb- 
ruary 1719 by William Hunt, one of the executors (power reserved to 
grant probate to Elianor Foster, Ann Nicholson and Elizabeth Nicholson, 
the other executors). Another probate granted to Elianor Foster 8 July 
172<). To my son William one thousand acres in Baltimore Co. called 
Poplar Neck and two lots in London town Ann Arundell Co., which I pur- 
chased from Thomas Holland and Mehittable Parepoint. To my son 
Joseph three tracts of laud, viz 1 Batchellor's Delight (about two hundred and 
ninety eight acres), Clark's Directions (about seven hundred and two acres), 
both in Ann Arundell Co., and Lockwood's Adveuture (four hundred acres) 
in Baltimore Co., as also one lot in London town (Ann Arundell Co.) 
taken up by Capt Richard Jones deceased. I give my part of a tract of 
land called Nicholson's manor, in Baltimore Co., containing about four 
thousand two hundred acres, to my sons Benjamin, Saaauel and Edward 



1060 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

(equally). Certain lands and stocks of negroes, cattle, &c. to be sold. Other 
bequests to sons. My will and desire is that my sisters Mrs. Eliuor Fos- 
ter, Mrs. Anne Nicholson and Mrs. Eliz a Nicholson take care and have the 
tuition of my children until they respectively come to age. And in case 
of death of any two of my said sisters my will is that Mr. William Hunt 
(merchant in London) have the care and tuition of my said children. And 
I so appoint my said sisters and Mr. William Hunt executors of my estate 
in Great Britain and my friends Mr. James Monat, Mr. Stephen Warman, 
James Nicholson and John Beale executors of my estate in Marylaud. 

Shaller, 37. 

John Lowe of" Hingum" near Boston in New England, mariner now 
belonging to her Majesty's Ship Triton, July 1707, proved 12 November 
1708. All goods &c, wages &c. to loving friend William Mason of How- 
ton in the County of Durham, mariner. 

Probate was granted, as above, to Adam Bird. Attorney lawfully deputed 
by William Mason, the natural and lawful father and administrator of 
William Mason deceased, while he lived executor named in the will of John 
Lowe lately of the royal ship Triton, bachelor, deceased &c. 

Barrett, 264. 

[There was a Lowe family in Hingham, Mass., at an early date. The only 
John in it, that could have been the testator, was John son of John and Eliza- 
beth, born in Hingham, April 3, 1655. But he had a family at Hingham. He 
died between 1694 and 1719. — Editor.] 

Richard Bennett, merchant of the English Nation dwelling in Malaga, 
16 February 1G61, proved 2 October 1662. I believe and confess the holy 
mother the " Catholique Church of Roome," under which faith and belief I 
promise to live and die. I desire that they inter my body in the church of 
Sagraria in this city, in which parish I live, in the sepulchre next unto 
Mrs. Frances Verney, my wife, which is buried in the same church, and 
that they accompany my corpse with the orders of the said Church and ten 
Religious of the Convent of St. Francis and the other ten of the Trinity, 
my body clothed in the habit of St. Francis &c. Directions for two hun- 
dred masses for my soul, for souls in Purgatory aud for my wife's soul also, 
and five masses more for the said Mrs. Francis Verney. Reference to 
wines laden in the Ship called the Hope, Robert Gardner M r .. consigned to 
Robert Robelau for New England, viz 1 ., 32 Butts of Wine and 243 Roones 
of Raisins. And I sent for England to my cousin William Pyne 18 Butts 
of Wine and 363 Pieces of frailed Raisins and 4'J6 Roones of Raisins &c. 
My sister Johan Bennett of Paignton in the Realm of England. My 
brother Nicholas Bennett, living in London, scrivener. My nephew Richard 
Churchward son of James Churchward and my sister Catherine Bennett. 
The sous and daughters of Julian Bennett my sister. The daughter of 
Anna Bennett my sister, whose name I know not. The children of William 
Pyne of Exou, merchant. My brother Nicholas, my universal heir. 

Laud, 123. 

Samuel Thompson citizen and stationer of London. 25 August 1 668, 
proved 9 November 1668. As to my estate I desire to own it as special 
mercy that anything may be left for my poor children when I consider my 
late losses in the firing of London, most humbly acknowledging the right- 
eousness of God in that sore judgment and that my sins were very great 
incentives of it and mightily 1 1< •] pi ■< 1 to draw, down that desolation on my 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 10G1 

self, neighbors and the whole city. I give my plate &c. to all my three 
children, equally to be divided. My desire is that my son John be main- 
tained in the place where he now is in Oxford until he be Master of Arts 
and enter on the Ministry. To ray son John all my lands and tenements 
in Neene in the Co. of Salop and in Knighton in the Co. of Worcester 
which will descend to him in right of his mother after his grandmother's 
decease. I hope he will be helpful to his two sisters, my two daughters 
Lydia and Mary. To my said son John all my right, title, interest and 
term of years in a close or piece of meadow or pasture ground, commonly 
called Overall Close, in the parish of Neene, which I desire him to accept 
in full of what he shall or may claim by virtue of the Custom of the City 
of London, in regard his estate will far exceed either of his sisters, he to 
give a release of all such claim within twenty days after he shall attain the 
full age of one and twenty years. To my said two daughters (evidently 
minors). If all my three children die before their respective age or mar- 
riage I give my children's portions to my nephew Thomas Thompson. I 
give to my nephew Thomas Thompson twenty pounds to be paid at the 
expiration of his indentures of Apprenticeship, or, if he be desirous to go 
over to his mother to New England, then at such time as shall be thought 
fit by my executor, to whose care and service I commit him for the remain- 
der of the time of his indentures. To my niece Beatrice Thompson five 
pounds. My faithful servant and friend Walter Kettleby. To my brother 
in law Mr. Matthew Poole five pounds and to his sons Matthew and Frauds 
fortv shillings apiece. The residue to my two daughters. My dear frieud 
Mr. Samuel Gellibrand to be sole executor, to whom fifty pounds for his 
pains. Hene, 146. 

[The testator was, I suppose, a brother to Thomas Thompson, who was at 
Farminj?ton, Connecticut. — H. F. Waters. 

Thomas Thompson, of Farmington, " may be," says Savage in his Gen. Diet., 
iv., 288, "that youth of 18 years who embarked in the Abigail at Lond®n, 
1 July. 1635, married 14- April, 1646. at Hartford, Ann, dau. ©f Gov. Thomas 
Welles, had there : Beatrice, bap. 17 January, 1647; John, b. 1649 ; Thomas, 
1651; .Mary, 7 June, 1653; and Esther, postlmm., bapt. 17 June, 1655; the last 
four born at Farmington, where he died 25 April of that year. His widow m. 
Anthony Hawkins; and Beatrice m. a Parker; Mary m. a Hawley, and Esther 
m. Samuel Gridley." — Editor.] 

Elianor Myles of London, widow, 5 November 1594, proved 13 No- 
vember 1594. To be buried in the church of St. John's Wal broke, where 
I am a parishioner, near the corpse of my late husband William Myles, 
pewterer, deceased. I give and bequeath to my loying cousin Mr. Edward 
Bulkley, Doctor of Divinity, twenty shillings in money to make him a ring, 
and to my cousin Rowland Bulkley other twenty shillings in money to 
make him a ring. The residue &c. I give and bequeath unto and amongst 
my four children Rowland Myles, William Myles, Alice Leverton, the 
wife of John Leverton, aud Jane Duffield, the wife of Thomas Duffield, 
equally &c. I make, ordain and constitute my said son in law Thomas 
Duffield and Jane his wife, my daughter, mine executors. And overseer 
of the same I make and appoint my cousin Mr. Doctor Bulkley. (In a 
later clause the name of the testatrix is written Milles.) 

Arch, of Loudon, B. 5, L. 10. 

Richard Madockes, clerk, of Woodhall (Odell) in the Co. of Bedford, 
15 August 1606, proved 27 November 1006. Brother David Madockes. 



1062 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

The bouse in Shrewsbury wherein he dwells. Another house there. Sis- 
ter Anne Tipton. Her daughter Elinor Tipton, Cousii John Nicholls of 
Shrewsbury, draper, to be her guardian. The poor of Woodhall ah Odell. 
Mr. Doctor Bulkley. To Mistress Olive Bulkley an angel of gold. To 
Mistress Elizabeth Bulkley, daughter of Mr. Doctor Bulkley and the said 
Olive, an angel of gold. Mistress Orme of Bletsoe and T u\ John Orme 
her husband. My cousin Daniel Price. Mr. Thomas P. yce his father. 
Cousins Timothy and Sampson Pryce. My mother. Edward Bulkley, 
Doctor of Divinity and pastor of the church in Woodhall to be sole execu- 
tor. Stafford, 85. 

[Dr. Bulkeley here mentioned is Rev. Edward Bulkeley, father of Rev. Peter 
Bulkeley of Concord, Mass. Olive, his wife, was buried, according to the Odell 
Parish Register, 10 March, 1614. For pedigree of the family see Register 
1869, pp. 300-304, Omerod's Cheshire, vols. ii. and iii.— W. K. Watkins.] 

John Newton, 1646, {ante p. 1040) : — 

[May not Anthony Newton, one of the founders of the Milton Church, have 
been the Anthony Newton mentioned in the will of John Newton above referred 
to? I am a descendant of Anthony Newton of Milton. He must have been in 
that town for many years, as he was voted land from the " new grant" not as 
an original settler, but as one who had claims as an early townsman. 

Newton Talbot.] 

Susan Bell of All Hallows Barking, London, widow (and relict and 
executrix of the last will and testament of Thomas Bell late of the same 
parish, merchant, deceased) 10 May, 1G72, proved 1 March 1672. My 
body to be buried in the said parish as near as may be to my deceased hus- 
band. To my son in law John Bell and Susan his wife twenty pounds, to 
buy them mourning, and likewise to John Wall my grandchild. More, I 
give to my said daughter Susan my biggest silver tankard with a foot to it, 
and to John Wall my grandchild my silver beer bowl. To my son in law 
Simon Baxter and Sarah his wife thirty pounds for mourning for them- 
selves and all their children. More, I give to the said Sarah Baxter my 
large silver caudle cup and porringer that covers it and to her daughter 
Sarah Baxter my silver sugar chest, to Susan Baxter my grand daughter 
my pair of silver candlesticks, to my grandson Edward Baxter a silver 
6ugar dish, to my grandson Simon Baxter my silver plate, to my grandson 
Robert Baxter fifty pounds at one and twenty, and if he die before attaining 
that age then to my grandson Simon Baxter, at same age, and if he die &c. 
then to my executor. More, I give unto him four silver spoons. To my 
son in law John Turpin and Mary his wife fifteen pounds for mourning 
and to my said daughter Mary my silver server* and the silver pint cup 
with a cover, because it was the desire of Mr. Richards, who gave it me, 
that she should have it after my decease. I give to my daughter in law 
Jane Bell my six trencher salts and my best diamond ring, with my great 
looking glass. To my grandson Clement Bell one silver tankard. Other 
silver plate to grandchildren Thomas Bell, Simon Bell and Susan Bell. To 

* Let me take this occasion to remark that in a rather large experience, especially among 
inventories in the Probate Registries chiefly of Essex, Middlesex and Suffolk counties^ 
Massachusetts, I have seen this word spelled, almost or quite invariably, either "server" 
or " sarver." In fact, I am not sure that, down to the period of our Revolution, I have 
ever seen the modern spelling " salver." I take it that the ordinary pronunciation of the 
vowel in the first syllable was like the present English pronunciation of the same vowel in 
" Derby." The sound of " r" becoming obscure the change of spelling from " server," or 
rather " sarver," to " salver" would easily follow. If I am right, then, the next change 
was in pronunciation, i. e. to " sal-ver." H. F. Waters. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1063 

mv loving brother William Brydon five pounds per annum, for life, and to 
his daughter Usher ten pounds. To my cousin Seale five pounds per 
annum for life, towards the bringing up of her two children. To my cousin 
Deborah Kerby ten pounds. To my cousin Hanuah Brydou, daughter of 
my brother John Brydon, deceased, ten pounds. To John Collins, son of 
Mr. John Collins of London, teu pounds. Deborah Royston, wife of Peter 
Royston. Elizabeth the wife of Humphrey South. Mr. Thomas Brookes. 
The poor (according to the advice of Mr. Brookes). 

Item, I give to Mrs. Anne Elliot, the wife of John Elliott of Roxbury 
in New England, my black cloth gown aud petticoat belonging to it. To 
Mrs. Martha Sanderson twenty shillings per annum for life. To Mr. John 
Knowls (a similar bequest). My cousin Mary Bell now living with me. 
My poor kindred of St. Edmond's Bury, or thereabouts, in the Co. of Suf- 
folk. My cousin Elizabeth Bell. My son Thomas Bell to be sole execu- 
tor and my sons in law John Bell, Simon Baxter and John Turpin to be 
overseers. 

Isaac Dafforne one of the witnesses. Pye, 32. 

[The will of her husband Thomas Bell appeared in these Gleanings (see Regis- 
ter, Vol. 38, p. G2), ante, pp. 23-4.— H. F. W.] 

Philip Blackaler late of New England, mariner, 26 August 1708, 
proved -*3 February, 1708. I give and bequeath all my wages and pay now 
due and payable unto me for my late service in H. M. S. Ruby unto my 
dearly beloved wife Mary Blacklar of New England, after my just debts 
aud funeral expences are first fully paid and satisfied. I do hereby nomi- 
nate and appoint Margaret Allsell, wife of doshua Allsell of St. John Wap- 
ping, Middlesex, mariner, my'sole executor. Lane, 24. 

Sir John Scott of Enfield, Middlesex, knight, 28 August 1719, with 
a codicil dated ID September 1719, proved 24 February 1719. To wife 
Mary all plate, Jewells &c, coach and chariot, coach horses, harness &c, 
the use of all the household goods and furniture in my mansion house at 
Enfield, for life, only the same to be " soused " in and with my said man- 
sion house and not otherwise. After her decease the same to belong to 
such person or persons as (according to this will &c.) shall for the time 
being be entituled to the freehold, reversion aud inheritance of my said man- 
sion house, to the end and intent that the same shall go and be enjoyed 
together with my said mansion house. To my brother Stephen Scott all 
my books &c. To my nephew John Scott one hundred pounds to make 
up the rent of the Wharf, which I purchased of Esq 1 '. Lake and lately set- 
tled upon the marriage of my said nephew, eighty pounds per annum dur- 
ing the present lease hereof, which is near expiring. I give also to my said 
nephew twenty pounds for mourning for himself and wife. To my nephew 
Thomas Scott five hundred pounds sterling and twenty pounds more for 
mourning for himself aud wife. To my cousin Joshua Scott the elder twenty 
pounds, to his son Caleb ten pounds aud to his youngest son twenty five 
pounds. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my cousin Joseph Scott twenty pouuds 
and to his sou Joseph Scott, now or late of New England, twenty pouuds, 
the same to be paid him at his age of one and twenty years. Twenty 
pounds apiece to my cousins Isham Baggs and Jane Towle (late Baggs; 
and Elizabeth Baggs. To Johu and William Maud the two sons of my 
cousin John Maud die elder ten pounds apiece. To Elizabeth Maud, his 
daughter, two hundred pouuds and to Joyce Maud, another daughter, one 



1064 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

hundred pounds. To the son of Richard Ryland which he had hy Eliza- 
beth, his late wife, ten pounds. Various sums given for rnourniug to 
mother in law Mrs Mary Berry, to Mr. White Wooley and his wife, to 
cousin John Houlton and his wife, cousin Mary Houlton daughter of 
Nathaniel Houlton, cousin Daniel Berry, distiller, and his wife, to sister in 
law Mrs Katherine Newell, to Mr. John Towusend sen r ., to Mr. Thomas 
Andrews and his wife, to Mr. William Townsend and his wife, to Mr John 
Bradley of Enfield. Bequests to Mr. Thomas Gearing aud Mr. William 
Hamond. John Moore, schoolmaster in Shoreditch. St. Thomas Hospital 
in Southwark. The poor of the city or the new city workhouse. The poor 
of Enfield. 

The residue of my personal estate &c. to be divided in two equal moieties, 
one of which I give to my said wife Mary. As to the other moiety I give 
five thousand pounds, part thereof to my friends the said Thomas Gearing 
of London, mercer, and William Hamond of London, goldsmith, in trust 
for the purchase of freehold houses and lands &c for the use of my brother 
Stephen Scott for life, next for his sons in tail, then to his (laughters in tail, 
then for my said nephew John Scott. My wife Mary and brother Stepheu 
Scott to be executors. A reference to Articles of Agreement made, on or 
about 26 April 1682, between Daniel Berry of London, merchant (my late 
father in law, now deceased) of the one part and myself, by the name of 
John Scott, citizen and soapmaker of Loudon, of the other part, reciting 
therein the marriage then intended between me and my said wife. I did 
agree to settle my moiety of the mansion or farm house called Aeon &c. 
and of several lauds and hereditaments &c, situate aud lying in Plumstead 
in Kent, to the use of myself and wife during our lives aud afterwards to our 
issue, both male and female. Other agreements referred to. Tenements 
and wharves in the parish of St. Martin in the Vintry aud other lauds aud 
tenements aud hereditaments of the said Daniel Berry in the said parish. 
Freehold houses, lands, wharves &c. in the parishes of St. Andrew Ward- 
robe, St. Mary Somerset and All Hallows the Great. Katherine the wife 
of nephew John Scott. Samuel Houlton of London, merchant appointed 
a trustee for a certain purpose. Shaller, 43. 

Nicholas Harrison late of Virginia, planter, but dying in the parish 
of St. Sepulchre's, London, did, on or about the month of October, A. D. 
1652, make his last will aud testameut nuncupative or by word of mouth, 
as followeth, viz 1 , he did give and bequeath unto his mother Dorothy Har- 
rison all his estate whatsoever that he should die possessed of if he should 
die a bachelor or unmarried, or to the like effect, &c. &c. 

Commission issued 28 September 1613 to Dorothy Harrison, the natural 
aud lawful mother of the deceased aud universal legatary in the will. 

Brent, 230. 

[The will of Daniel Wyld of Virginia in the July Gleanings, page 394 (ante, 
p. 1050), mentions a kinsman Nathaniel Harrison. — Editor.] 

John Davexauxte the elder, citizen and merchant tailor of London. 
18 July 1595, proved 6 November 1596. One third part of my goods, 
chattels, &c, according to the laudable custom of the city of London, to 
Margaret, my well beloved wife, aud one other third part to aud amongst 
my children, viz* John, William, James, Raphe, George and Margaret 
Davt'imunte, equally to be divided amongst them or amougst so many of 
them as shall be unadvauced. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1065 

Then follows the disposition of testator's third part amoug the children 
and other legatees. To my son in law Steven Payne twenty pouuds to 
buy him a gelding and to my daughter Judith, his wife, twenty marks to 
make her a pair of bracelets. To my brother William Davenaunt a ring 
of gold of the value of three pounds. To my sister his wife a ring worth 
forty shillings and to every one of his sons and daughters forty shillings 
apiece, to make each a ring. To my cousin Margaret Coo ah Copley five 
pounds, to be delivered to her own hands, for her own proper use, and an 
annuity of four pounds yearly for life. To Bridget Coo now dwelling with 
me forty shillings, to make her a ring, and to every one of the residue of 
my sister Coo's sons and daughters forty shillings apiece. My cousin John 
Davenaunt and his son John. Katheriu, sister of the said John. The rest 
of my said cousin John's children, except John and Katherine. My cousin 
Mary Kelinge, widow. My brother in law William Walter Esq. and my 
sister his wife and Elizabeth his daughter. My brother in law George 
Lydeat and my sister Anne his wife. 

I give and bequeath unto my brother in law Randall Syfiies and to my 
sister his wife, to each of them a ring of gold of the value of forty shillings 
in token of my good will. My cousin Paternoster. My friends Mr. Rich- 
ard Benyan, Mr. William Wilkes and Anthony Goulson. To the late 
wife of my cousin James Chapman. My friends Roger Jones, dier, John 
Sparke and John Sare. My daughter in law Anne Daveuaunte. Certain 
servants and apprentices named (among them a Henry Adams). The poor 
of Sibble Henningham (Hedingham) Essex and of Croydon Surrey. My 
dwelling house in the parish of our Lady St. Mary at Bow within the city 
of London, with ways leading from Bow Lane and from Watliug Street. 
My house and land in Croydon. 

I make my wife Margaret and my son Edward Davenauute executors 
and my son in law Stephen Payne, brother in law George Lydeat and 
friend William Wilkes, citizen and vintner of London, my overseers. 

Drake, 79. 

Randal Syms. Mense Nouembris 1599, Octavo die emanavit comissio 
Edwardo Glover nni creditor Randalli Syms uuper parochie Sci Laurentii 
Pountney ciuitatis London def. hSntis etc. ad admistrand bona iura et cred- 
ita dci dgf. duran minori etate Randalli, Dorothee et Elizabethe Syms 
liberor dci def. etc. Admon. Act Book, 1599. 

[The Randal Syms whose Admon. I give above was possibly the man called 
brother in law by John Scrogges of Patmer Hall in Hertfordshire, 1592 (see 
Reg. for 1894, p. 123, ante p. 824). It is evident now- that Mrs. Sarah Symmes 
of Cambridge, New England, was not a daughter, as I have suggested in my 
note appended to the will of Ann Scroggs (on page 125 of the same vol., ante 
p. 825). Her age, as given on page"l26, ante p. 82G, would show it to be 
impossible. 

The will of Thomas Man, which I give below, is most interesting since he 
speaks of a Sara Sims, who was dwelling with him, as the daughter of his late 
wife, and further on in his will he mentions a son in law Randoll Simmes. As 
he also calls the Lady Stanley his late wife's sister he must be referring to the 
same family of Symmes noticed in the wills of the Scrogges family. Sir 
Thomas Stanley seems to have married Mary, widow of John Scrogges, mother 
of Edward Scrogges and grandmother of the Anne Scroggs who referred to her 
cousin Sara Simmes as in New England in 1G41. 

What John Davenaunte had to do with this familv I do not know. 

H. F. Waters.] 

Thomas Man, citizen and stationer of London. 7 February 1G24, proved 
16 June 1625. I have already fully advanced all my sous aud daughters 






10(36 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

m marriage excepting only my sou Jonas. I give to him the lease of my 
house in Pater-uoster Row in London now in the occupation of Benjamin 
Fisher &c The poor of St. Faith's under St. Paul's. The poor of the 
Hospital of Kent Street in Southwark called the Lock. To the Company 
of Stationers twelve pounds to make them a dinner or a supper, at their 
choice, on the day of my burial. My grandchild Anne Lownes, now the 
wife of William Grantham. The eight children of my daughter Francis 
Kent late the wife of Henry Kent deceased, viz' Johan, Robert, Henry, 
John, Thomas, Anne, Jonas and Francis (Frances?) Kent. Thomas and 
Edward Kinnaston sons of Edward Kinnaston and of Johan his wife my 
late daughter deceased. The children of Nathaniel Man my son, viz' 
Anne, Johan, Francis (Frances?) Nicholas and Thomas. John Elie and 
John Bishopp. My cousin Katherine Chambers. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto Sara Sims now dwelling with me, the 
daughter of my late wife, the sum of fifty and five pounds of lawful money 
of England (within one year after my decease), my feather bed which was 
her mother's (and other bedding). And if my said son Jonas and the said 
Sara do marry together then [ give unto the same Sara fifty pounds more, 
to be paid unto her on the day of her marriage. To my daughter Kent. 
My son in law Edward Kent. My son Paul Man to have all my right and 
title to my house aud lands at Hammersmith. His children, Martha, 
Thomas, Francis (Frances?) and Paul. My son Nathaniel. My son John. 
His three children, John, Anne aud Elizabeth. My son in law H urn f rev 
Lownes. Anne and William, two of the children of William Grantham 
who married my grandchild Anne Lownes. Sara their daughter, now 
dwelling with me. To the Lady Stanley, my late wife's sister, a ring of 
gold of twenty shillings value. To Mary Ritchbell, my late wife's daugh- 
ter, a ring of gold of forty shillings value. To Dianis Hawkesbye, her 
sister, a ring of gold of twenty shillings value. My cousin Richard Ock- 
would. To my son in law Randoll Simmes a ring of gold of three pounds. 
To AVilliam Richbell son of the said Mary Ritchbell forty shillings. My 
friend Arthur Johnson and his wife. 

One of the witnesses was William Richbell, scrivener. Clarke, 65. 

William Hall of Borton in Crepredie, 6 August 1596, proved 21 
October 1596. To my two daughters Joane Haull and Mary Haull twenty 
pounds apiece to be paid them at the age of eighteen years old apiece. To 
William Haull my son all my freehold to enter of it at the age of twenty 
one years. Other bequests to him; and if my wife marry before my 
son be at the age of twenty one years she shall deliver these things unto 
Henry Shewell my brother in law whom I do will shall have the education 
and bringing up of my said son William from the time of her marriage 
until he shall accomplish the age of twenty one years. But if my wife 
keep her unmarried she shall occupy and have half my living during her 
life. The poor in Borton. Every godchild. To the mending of the 
church way betwixt Borton and Cropredie five shillings, to be bestowed by 
the churchwardens. I make my wife and my son executors. Wit: Hen- 
rie Showell, Thomas Wallis, Tho: Hall. They to be overseers. He 
oweth John Haull, his brother, forty pounds. The will proved by the 
widow, power reserved for the son. Drake, 69. 

John Borrodale of Loudon, gentleman, 2 September 1667, proved 18 
November 1667. By an Indenture of Lease bearing date 12 June 1665 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 10G7 

the Right lion. Philip, Earl of Pembroke and Mouutgomery did demise 
ami grant unto Richard Arnold of London, merchant, all his mines, lead 
ore and copper ore in Glamorgan for term of one and twenty years, &c, 
which lease the said Richard hath assigned and set over to me by writing 
dated 19 July 1GG5. I give said lease to my two sons John and Benjamin, 
the profits to be equally paid betwixt them at their respective ages of one 
and twenty years, my executrix to manage the same, in the meantime, 
according to her discretion. If these two die &c. then I give the same to 
my two sons Broughtou and Francis. If they die then to my two daugh- 
ters Anne and Rebecca and to the child now in the womb of my wife. 
The rest to be divided into three equal parts, one third whereof I give to 
my dear wife Anne, another third I give to my children John, Benjamin, 
Broughton, Francis, Anne, Rebecca and the child now in the womb of my 
wife, at age of one and twenty &c, which age my son John will attain 5 
January 1675, Benjamin 3 June 1680, Broughton 28 May 168-1, Francis 
29 April 1686, daughter Anne 17 March 1681, Rebecca 4 July 1683. 
Out of the other third of my estate I give unto my loving sisters Anne 
Denison, Alice Hi neks and Margaret Michell three pounds apiece as tokens 
of my love, to my wife's father (and my dear friend) to my sister Brough- 
ton, to my brother and sister Thatcher and to Mr. Joseph Whestone twenty 
shillings apiece to buy them rings. Thirty pounds to such godly and reli- 
gious persons who are necessitous. Additional legacies to children. To 
John Mosyer and William Moses and to my brother Mr. Andrew Brough- 
ton forty shillings apiece. The rest to my sons and the unborn child. Sir 
William Brereton was in his lifetime indebted unto Francis Allen Esq. 
deceased, in a certain sum of money which is now become jointly due unto 
John Allen Esq. and to me. Out of my part of it I give uuto Thomas 
Edgleyjr., son of Thomas Edgley gen f , one hundred and fifty pounds and 
unto .... Edgley, daughter of the said Thomas, one hundred pounds 
towards the satisfaction of a legacy of three hundred pounds and another 
of two hundred pounds given to the said Thomas and .... Edgley by the 
last Will and Testament of Francis Allen, hoping the said John Allen, for 
the sake of the relation they stand in both to him and to the said Francis 
Allen, will pay unto them the remaining part of their legacies, given as 
before mentioned. I make my wife Anne sole executrix; and the said 
John Mosier. William Moses and my brother Broughton to be aiding &c. 
I do further cive to my worthy friend Dr. Browne two pieces in gold, to 
Mr. John Richardson forty shillings, to my brother and sister Taylor twenty 
shillings apiece, to my uncle and aunt Andrew twenty shillings. Others. 

Carr, 145. 

John Aldwyn citizen and merchant taylor of Loudon, 16 September 
1680, proved 10 June 1681. To my aunt Prudence Nicholls, so long as 
she continues sole and unmarried, six pounds per annum. My brother 
Thomas Aldwyn and his wife. My brother Edward Aldwyn. My brother 
Mr. Joseph Masters and his wife. My father in law Mr. Benjamin An- 
drews, my mother in law Mrs. Anne Andrews, my brothers in law Mr. 
John Boradale and Mr. Benjamin Boradale, my sister in law Mrs. Rebecca 
Boradale and my uncle Andrew Broughton Esq. and my Aunt Broughtou. 
My unck Capt. John Spencer. My sister Rachell Ogden. My endeared 
friend Mr. William Collins. My said wife's father iu law the said Mr. 
Benjamin Andrews. My own sister Elizabeth Aldwyn. The poor of the 
church at Petty France, London. Reference to wife's late father John 



1068 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Boradale's estate. To rny dear father Humphrey ( Aldwyn ?) ten pounds 
to buy him and my mother mourning. North, 85. 

Benjamin Andrews of Market street in the County of Hertford gen*, 
13 April 1687, proved 15 September 1687. My son Thomas Penrose and 
Elizabeth his wife and their sous and daughter, Henry, Andrews, Thomas 
and Anne. My son John Borradale and Mary his wife. My son William 
Rimes and Rebecca his wife. My daughter Anne Alden widow. My sis- 
ter Sarah Crooke widow. My cousin John Crooke and Sarah his wife. 
My cousin William Whitehead and Frances his wife. My cousin Thomas 
Blackall. My loving wife Anne Andrewes. My messuages, lands &c. in 
Studham, Bedfordshire and Carrington Herts. Foot, 112. 

[These Borroclale wills ought to interest a number of people in New England 
who are descended from Mrs. Dennison or Mrs. Michell. There are other inter- 
esting names given. H. F. Waters. 

Among the descendants of Margaret Mitchell, who married Major Stephen 
Sewall, of Salem, is Grover Cleveland, president of the United States. His 
line of descent is as folknvs : 1. Margaret Borrodale, married Rev. Jonathan 
Mitchell; 2. Margaret Mitchell, m. Major S. Sewall; 3. Susanna Sewall, m. 
Rev. Aaron Porter; 4. Susauua Porter, m. Aaron Cleveland; 5. Rev. Aaron 
Cleveland; 6. William Cleveland; 7. Richard Falley Cleveland ; 8. Grover Cleve- 
land. See Putnam's Historical Monthly, Vol. I., N. S., pp. 151-3. — Eben Put- 
nam. 

Anne Denison, named in the will of John Borodale, can be none other 
than the second wife of Capt. George Denison of Stonington, who came, a lad in 
his teens, in the Lion 1631, a fellow passenger with the Apostle Eliot. He grew 
to manhood at Roxbury, •where his father was deacon. He there married 
Bridget Thompson, who died early, leaving two daughters. Denison returned 
to England, participated in the unhappy wars, then prevalent, and was wounded 
at Naseby, where he served under Cromwell. In his wounded condition, he was 
attended by a daughter of the gentleman to whose house he had been carried. On 
recovery he married the lady, who was Aim, daughter of John Borodell, as the 
name has been usually spelled here ; again came to Roxbury and dwelt there till 
1651, when, in the interest of Massachusetts, then claiming the eastern section 
of Connecticut, he removed first to the Pequot river and finally in 1654 to Ston- 
ington, then called Southertown {vide Register, Oct. 1893, p. 459), was appointed 
"clerk of the writts " and commissioner. After the absorption of the whole 
territory by the colony of Connecticut, Denison remained at Stonington, where 
he led a life of the most active and distinguished character, in both civil and 
military affairs. As a soldier, no citizen of his day was more conspicuous, ex- 
cepting only John Mason. He died at Hartford in 1691, in his 76th year. His 
wife, Ann Borodell, long outlived him, dying iu 1712 at the age of 97. Three 
sons and three daughters married into the leading families of southeastern Con- 
necticut, and the farm, originally settled by Capt. George, is in the occupation, 
as it has ever since been, of his namesakes; while the name and fame of 
Ann Borodell are perpetuated in hundreds of her fair descendants in the Gal- 
lup, Stanton, Palmer, Chesebro, Miner, Williams, Babcock, Brown and Wheeler 
families. It is traditional in those families that Ann's brother, John, came to 
America, but the language of the will, above quoted, renders the tradition un- 
likely. Possibly his son John came. 

Margaret Borodell, as is well known, was the third wife of Rev. Thomas 
Shepard of Cambridge ; and on his decease became the wife of his successor, 
Rev. Jonathan Mitchell.— Geo. A. Gordon.] 

James Capen. The third day of September A. D. 1628 James Capen 
of Ilolborne in the County of Middlesex, scrivener, being sick iu body but 
of good memory did by word of mouth declare his will and purpose how his 
estate should be disposed of after his death, as followeth ; first, he did 
appoint that his mother Joane Capen the wife of Barnard Capen of Dor- 
chester in the County of Dorset, shoemaker, should, out of the estate of the 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1069 

said James, pay unto his four sisters unmarried four pounds apiece. And 
all the residue of his moneys, apparel] and goods whatsoever he gave to his 
said mother to do with it according to her mind. Whereunto were wit- 
nesses Barnard Capen the younger and Jerom Wolverton. Barnard Capen 
his Inke (sic/) Jerom Wolverton. Barrington, 83. 

[It appears from a copy of an origiual Capen family record, printed in the 
Register, ii., 80, that " Barnard Capen maryed Joan, y e dafter of Oliuer Pur- 
chis, y e yeer of o r Lord, 1596, on munday, in whitson week, & dyed y e 8 of No- 
uember,*1638, aged 7G"; consequently, born about the year 1562. Also, " Joan 
Capen. y° daughter of Oliuer Purchis, dyed ye 26 of March, 1653, y e night before, 
aged 75 veers " ; she was born about the year 1578. 

A fragment of the original grave-stone of Barnard and Joan Capen was 
found a few years ago, in the old cemetery at Dorchester. It is in possession 
of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society, a copy of -which is here 
appended, as, also, a copy from the renewed stone, as it now stands, in that 
ancient burial-ground. This is, probably, " the oldest Inscription to be found 
on any grave stone in New England," so far as the date of death of Barnard 
Capen is concerned. — Register, iv., 165. 



BODY OF 
PEN AGED 
IED Y e 

ER 1638 

JOAN 
AGED 



Here 

lies the Bodies of 

M r Barnard Capen 

& M rs Joan Capen his 

wife; He died Nov 8 

1638 Agad 76 years 

& She died March 

26 1653 

Aged 75 years. 



The name of Barnard Capen appears first on the Dorchester, Massachusetts, 
Town Records, in connection with laud grants, as we now have them, page 6, 
thus : 

5 Aug: 1633. " nicho: Upsall, Bernard Capen, Phillip Randall, James Par- 
ker, 4 acres a peece." 

He is last mentioned in the allotment of lands at " the necke," now South Boston, 
March 18. 1637, with the Cowes Pasture and other land, when portions were assigned 
him, as also to his son John, who, according to the record, Avas " born y e 26 of 
January, in y e yeer of o r Lord, 1612," and died in Dorchester, the 4th of April, 
1692. aged 80 years, having had nine children, by his two wives, whose maiden 
names were Redegon Clap, and Mary Bass. This John, who was the only son 
of Barnard, in this country, of whom we have any record, was a prominent 
man in Dorchester, during his long life, having been captain, deacon of the 
church, deputy to the General Court, and town recorder. 

There is no assurance that " Barnard Capen the younger," one of the witnesses 
to the will of James Capen, as above mentioned, was a son of Barnard, of Dor- 
chester, though he may have been. 

The testator speaks of "his four sisters unmarried." The names of two, 
onlv, are given, in the " Capen Faniilv Record," namely, " Ruth, born 7 August 
1600, and Susanna, born 11 of April 1602." 

The •' Widdow Purchase," whose name is first mentioned 5 Aug. 1633, (Dorch. 
Town Records, page 6), in connection with a land grant to Barnard or " Bernard 
Capen" and three times afterwards on the Town Records, was, quite likely, 
widow of Oliver Purchase, also mother to Barnard Capen's wife, and to " m r 
Oliver Purchase," who with Sarah Purchase, probably his wife, joined the 
Dorchester Church prior to the fourth of the ninth month 1639. 

Oliver Purchase, freeman 7 Dec. 1636, removed, according to Savage, early 
to Taunton, thence to Lynn, where his wife Sarah died 21 Oct. 1671. He 
married 17 Sept. 1672, Mary, daughter of Rev. William Perkins; was repre- 
sentative to the General Court, 1660, and often after ; removed to Concord, Mass., 
about 1691, and there died 20 Nov. 1701. His age as given at death varies from 
84 to SS years. On the Town Records at Concord, he is styled " m r Oliver Pur- 
chas y* worthy Gentleman." 

William Perkins, father to Rev. William, above, whose daughter Mary was 



1070 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

the second wife of Oliver Purchase, of Dorchester, etc., is mentioned in the 
■will of Samuel Purchas, author of the " Pilgrims," as his brother in law. See 
Register, x., 370; xxxviii., 319, 320, ante, pp. 68, 69. William B. Trask.] 

Henry Smith of London gen*, 3 November 1647, with a Codicil dated 
6 July 1652, proved 3 May 1653. I have taken an Assurance of Land 
enrolled and bearing date 26 May 4 Caroli Rs.. in the name of Henry 
Munday my nephew, in consideration of six hundred twenty five pounds, 
for the payment of fifty pounds yearly to my said nephew Henry Munday 
and the heirs of his body forever. My will is that he shall have the 6aid 
Assurance delivered unto him after my death &c. Reference to nephew 
Edward Munday deceased. To John Sandall of Furnivall's Inn, Middle- 
sex, gen e one thousand marks. The same to John Smith of St. Paul's 
Alley, London, draper. I am estated in the manor of Piratt's als Sawston 
in the Co. of Cambridge for the life of Henry Huddleston Esq., which one 
Mr. Byat holds by lease from me for certain years to come. I give the 
same manor &c. unto the said Henry Huddleston. I give to Katherine 
Spurr twenty pounds. To my godson Valentine Kent twenty pounds. My 
old servant William Gillam. My servant Francis Moult. All my fellow- 
servants, men and women, at this time here at London. Richard Berridge 
to be executor. 

In the Codicil he refers to his nephew Henry Mundy as " now in New 
England." Brent, 325. 

Walter Cole of Lavenham, Suffolk, barber chirurgion, 13 August 
1652, proved 24 September 1653. My will is that Susan my well beloved 
wife shall have, hold, occupy and enjoy my messuage or tenement wherein 
I now dwell &c, situate in the High street in the borough of Lavenham, 
for term of her natural life; and after her decease it shall remain unto 
Anne my daughter now wife of Abraham Nellsou, for term of the natural 
life of Abraham Nellson, aforesaid, of Colchester, my son in law, and term 
of the natural life of my daughter Anne his wife; then to their sou Abra- 
ham Nellson my nephew. But the said Anne my daughter shall pay unto 
my daughter Jane the now wife of Thomas Day of Colchester, Essex, fifteen 
pounds, within a year after the decease of Susan my wife, and also twenty 
shillings more unto my daughter Elizabeth the now wife of John Fuller in 
New England, to be paid withni three years after the decease of Susan my 
wife. I give to my daughter Susan the now wife of William Death of 
Lavenham five shillings, to be paid her within one month after the decease 
of Susan my wife. The residue I give to my said wife whom I make sole 
executrix. Brent, 389. 

[John Fuller of Cambridge, who " settled on the south side of the river, now 
Newton, about 1644, and was an extensive landholder," had a wife Elizabeth, 
and they may be the persons mentioned by Walter Cole in his will. John Fuller 
died February 7, 1698. His widow Elizabeth died April 13, 1700. (Paige's 
History of Cambridge, Mass., p. 556, and S. C. Clarke's Fuller Genealogy, p. 3.) 
— Editor.] 

Rowland Thompson citizen and haberdasher of London, 31 May 1662, 
proved 7 August 1662. To wife Barbarah Thompson the lease of the house 
wherein I now dwell and of the house next adjoining to the same, in the 
parish of St. Stephen Coleman Street London, to hold for the residue of 
the term of said lease if she shall so long live. If she die before the expi- 
ration of said lease I give it to my daughter Sarah Burton wife of Daniel 
Burton of Upwood in the Co. of Huntington clerk, with remainder to my 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1071 

grand daughter Barbarah Burtou, her daughter. I give to iny daughter iu 
law Barbarah Clarke of New England, widow, live pounds. The residue 
to my wife Barbarah whom I make sole executrix. 

Com. of London (16G0-1GG4) B. 31 L. 167. 

John Jdrdan of Weymouth, Dorset, yeoman (date not given) proved 
1 December 1561. My body to be buried in the church or churchyard. 
To Walter Jurdeu, my eldest son, my dwelling house iu Waymouth &c. 
To second son Hugh house and stable &c. If wife be with child I give to 
said child my other new house now a building. Wife Agnes to enjoy these 
lands &c. until the children shall come to the several ages of twenty four 
years. My said wife Agnes to be sole executrix aud my brother Thomas 
Jurden and William Best to be overseers. Loftes, 37. 

John Jurdaine of Lyme Regis, Dorset, merchant, 23 September 1588, 
proved 13 November 1588. To be buried in the church of Lyme Regis. 
The poor of that parish. The poor of Axminster and of Charmouth. 
Katherine Hawkins, widow. All my godchildren. My brother William 
Jurdaine. My daughter Susan the now wife of John Woodroff. Her son 
John Woodroffe at two and twenty. Henry Woodroff another son. My 
daughter Judith at day of her marriage. My daughter Mary Jurdaine at 
eighteen. My four sons, Silvester, Robert. John and Charles. To Silves- 
ter my third part of the ship called the James Bonaventure. To son Robert 
my interest and term of Tucking Mill and Close, near the Mill green in 
Lyme Regis. Wife Thomazin, Son Charles at twenty five. I make my 
good friends Walter Harvie, John Jones, my brother Richard Jurdaine and 
my son in law John Woodroff, merchants, my executors of trust &c. 

Leicester, 7. 

Nicholas Bevys of the City of Exou (Exeter) merchant, 8 November 
1612, proved 2 June 1613. To be buried in the parish church of St. Mary 
Arches, within the said City. My loving friend William Martine Esq. 
Recorder of the city. My cousin Mr. Ignatius Jorden. My daughter 
Elizabeth Bevys. A legacy bequeathed unto her by her grandfather Bevis 
deceased and a gift for her usa to me paid by Mrs. Jane Martynn, her graud- 
mother. All my children except Elizabeth. My wife to be sole executrix- 
and my loving friends the said William Martynn my brother John Marshall 
and my cousin Ignatius Jourdeun to be overseers. Proved by Richorde 
Bevis, widow and executrix. Capell, 53. 

John Jourdaine of London, merchant, dated in London 8 February 
and sealed and delivered iu Gravesend 16 February 1617. proved 27 Sep- 
tember 1620. Bound on a voyage to the East Indies. I have made an 
agreement with the Honorable Company to serve them five years to be their 
principal agent in the Indies, for which service they are to allow me three 
hundred fifty pounds per annum. I have laid into their bauds twelve hun- 
dred pounds to be paid three for one at my return to England or one aud a 
half to one if I die before my coming home. Also of this three hundred 
fifty pounds per annum for my wages I declare that they are to give fifty 
pounds yearly unto my sister Viney as long as I am wanting out of Eng- 
land. The house where my sister Viney dwelleth which I bought of my 
cousin Ignatious Jourden, cost two hundred pounds, the writing thereof I 
leave with my sister Viney. In the hauds of my cousin Thomas Jourden 
on adventure to the Isle of St. Michael's. My sister Viuey's children Hes- 



1072 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

ter and Robert Viney. Provision for the maintenance of my wife and her 
son John Jourdaine. The principal to be delivered him at his marriage if 
in case he marry in England with the consent of my sister Viney, my cou- 
sin John Jourden of Exon (Exeter) and William Keredge, or two of them 
consenting thereto. My sister's daughter Hester Viney. Anthony Wood- 
roffe her brother. My three kinswomen Judith Hunt, Ann and Susan Jour- 
den my brother and sister daughters. My brother Charles. My sister 
Mary and her daughter, my goddaughter. My poor kinsfolk at Lyme. 
The poor of Lyme. My kinsmen John Woodroffe, At r (Arthur) Wood- 
roffe, John Jourdaine and Robert Viney. My sister Susan Viney to be 
my executrix of trust, my cousiu John Jourden of Exeter, my cousin Wil- 
liam Keredge of Lyme and Mr. Richard Harvie to be my overseers. 

Proved (as above) by Susan Viney. Commission issued 13 November 
1622 to Jone Viney, executrix of the will of Susan Viney deceased, to 
administer the goods not fully administered by the said Susan. 

Commission issued 22 October 1628 to Susan Jorden, relict of the de- 
ceased, to administer &c. the grant to a certain Jone Viney in November 
1622 being revoked 1625. Soame, 87. 

John Jordaine of the City of Exeter, merchant, 26 July 1627, proved 
2 July 1628. The poor of Exeter and the poor of Lyme Regis. The poor 
of Tiverton, Devon. I give to the youngest of my brother Ignatius Jor- 
daine's children fifty pounds, to be paid unto him when he shall come to 
the age of two and twenty years. To my sister Elizabeth Crowe all that 
her husband did owe me in his life time and to her five children fifty pounds, 
i.e. ten pounds apiece. To my sister Christian Lathy one annuity or yearly 
rent of six pounds to be issuing out of all my messuages, lands &c, called 
Kerslake ah Carslake, in Tiverton, which I lately purchased of John 
Kerslake. To my sister Lathy's children twenty pounds. To my sister 
Joane Sinckler ten pounds and to her children ten pounds. To the children 
of William Bolt of Crediton twenty pounds. To Robert Bolt's youngest 
daughter twenty pounds. To Nicholas Bolt's youngest daughter twenty 
pounds. Ten pounds to be bestowed for the relieving of Elizabeth Wou- 
ston (or Wonston), the wife of Gregory Wonston (or Wouston), but no 
part of it shall ever come to her husband's hands or disposition. To my 
son John my parsonage of Exbourne in Devon. My son Samuel. My sou 
William and such woman as shall be his wife at the time of his decease. 
My daughter Katherine. My manor of Exbourne. To Samuel the occu- 
pation of my dwe 1 ling house in Exon. My land in the parish of Saint 
Sidwell's lying without the East gate of the city, containing seaventeen acres, 
to be enjoyed by my wife Joane as long as she shall live unmarried after 
my decease ; then to my son John. My son Joseph at four and twenty. 
My three daughters, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah. Mary and Katherine the 
children of mv daughter Katherine. Wife Joane to be executrix and my 
brother Ignatius Jordaine and my brother in law James Osmond to be over- 
seers. Ignatius Jurdaiue one of the witnesses. Barrington, 67. 

Elizabeth Jurdain of the City and County of Exoft\ widow, 27 Sep- 
tember 1603, proved 31 October 1633. To be buried in the parish church 
of St. Mary Arches in Exon, in the grave of my late deceased husband, and 
my desire is that Mr. Henry Painter may preach my funeral sermon. I 
give to Walter Younge the elder of Collyton and to John Davy of Credy 
in the parish of Sauford, Devon, Esquires, and to Ignatius Jurdiane of the 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1073 

City of Exon Esq., John Champneys gen', -and Johu Ilayne the elder, 
merchaut of Exon, five hundred pounds to he employed by them for such 
good and pious uses within the County and City in such manner and form 
as they shall think fit and convenient. I give to Mr Henry Painter, minis- 
ter of St. Petrocks in Exon forty pounds and ten pounds more to the use 
of Heury, his son, to be paid him by his said father when he shall accom- 
plish the age of one and twenty years or marry. Other clergymen (includ- 
ing M r . Josias Gale minister of St. Davyes). The poor of Exon and of 
Liscard in Cornwall. Anne Coade my sister. Philip Coade my servant. 
William Sampford my servant. 

Item. I civeall that debt which Nathaniel Duncan oweth, aud is indebted un- 
to me, unto his two sons Peter and Nathaniel Duncan, to be divided equally 
between them. Item, I release and discharge William Hill my kinsman of 
all debts and demands whatsoever due unto me from him. I give to James 
White of the City of Exon, merchant, fifty pounds upon condition that he, 
his heirs &c, pay yearly unto Elizabeth Ryder my sister in law, during her 
life, four pounds quarterly to be paid by equal portions, being a legacy 
bequeathed her by my late husband deceased; and I give to the said Eliza- 
beth Ryder ten pounds. I give unto the aforesaid James White fifty 
pounds more upon condition that he pay unto Anne Taiue four pounds 
yearly during her life, being a legacy given by my late husband. My son 
John Jurdaiue. My daughters Ruth and Sara Jurdaine. Mr John Hayne 
the elder of the City of Exon, merchant, and Mr James White to be my 
executors in trust, and I give the residue to them until Elizabeth, Susanna, 
John, Sarah, Lydia and Ruth Jurdaiue, ray children, shall severally accom- 
plish the age of one and twenty years or be married. 

Nicho: Carwithie one of the witnesses. Russell, 89. 

Ignatius Jurdain. dated in Exeter 1 March 1635, proved 16 October 
1640. To wife Elizabeth one third part of all my goods and to my childreu 
that are unmarried one other third part, according to the Order of the City. 
To the poor &c. The poor of Lyme where I was born and the poor of 
Gernezey where I was new born. My sister Wackley's children. Richard 
Slade in St. Thomas parish. Mrs. Mauton, widow. My cousin William 
Ryder's wife. My brother Synckler. The poor of Topsom (Topsham). 
Mr. Painter (and other ministers). Also I give to the children of my son 
Nathaniel Duncan one hundred pounds. Also I give to the children of my 
son William Hill one hundred pounds. All which money I will shall be 
delivered to the fathers of each of them and to pay it when they come to 
the age of four and twenty years, if they be well able to pay it. I forgive 
all moneys owing unto me if it be under the value of twenty shillings each. 
My wife to be executrix. For my son Joseph I pray my wife Elizabeth, 
my executrix, and my overseers to take some pains for the placing of him 
with his portion during his life. Coventry, 130. 

(Sir) Simon Baskervill (knight) Doctor in Physic, of the parish of 
St. Dunstan in the West (London) 20 April 1641, proved 7 July 1641. I 
give my dwelling house in Fleet Street aud all my houses adjoining, which 
I lately did purchase of Sir George Crooke, to my dear wife and to her 
heirs forever. I give to my sister Jourdayne ten pounds. To her sou, my 
nephew Ignatius Jourdayne I give all my books of Divinity. I give to 
my nephew Richard Baskervill two hundred pounds. To my trusty servant 
Thomas Hall twenty pounds. To the poor of St. Dunstan's parish wherein 



1074 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

I dwell three pounds. All the rest of my goods and leases whatsoever I 
give to my dear wife whom I make sole executrix. 

Proved by Dame Catherine Baskervill, relict &c. Evelyn, 88. 

Joane Jordaine of the City and County of Oxon (Exon) widow, 21 
October 1648, proved 25 August 1649. The poor of St. Mary Archers 
(Arches) wherein I now dwell. To Elizabeth Jordaine, Mary the wife of 
Christopher Letthebridge and Sarah Jordaine. daughters of John Jordaine 
my last husband, all those closes &c. in the parish of St. Sidwells without 
the city of Exeter which I there hold. Property in Tiverton to Joseph 
Jordaine youngest son of my late husbaud. My late husband's legacies to 
Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah. Fairfax, 1 23. 

Elizabeth Jurdaine of the City and County of Exeter widow, 20 
June 1645, proved 9 March 1649. John Painter of London, merchant, 
oweth me. Hugh Sowden of London, merchant, oweth me. Fifty pounds 
to the poor of Exeter in such manner as by the last will and testament of 
my late deceased husband Ignatius Jurdaine is ordained. To my grandchild 
Joseph Hill twenty pounds. The residue to my son Ignatius Jurdaine 
whom I make sole executor. Pembroke, 42. 

Dame Katherine Baskervile of Richmond Surrey, widow, late wife 
of Sir Simon Baskervile &c, 15 April 1670, proved 10 October 1670, My 
nephew Mr Richard Baskervile. Property in Kinge Street, Westminster. 
My cousin Mrs Prudence Martyn widow. My cousin Mrs Anne Martin 
widow. My god daughter Mrs Penelope Fisher. My nephew Mr Ignatius 
Jordan. My two young cousins Mrs Anne Lawrence and Mrs Katherine 
Biggs daughters of the aforesaid Anne Martin widow and grand daughters 
of the said Mrs Prudence Martin. Mrs Prudence Martin to be executrix. 

Peun, 132. 

[I am much inclined to believe that the "William Hill whom Mr. Ignatius Jur- 
dain, or Jordaine, called "son in law," was the William Hill of New Eng- 
land, whose sons William, James and Ignatius Hill were legatees under the 
will of Mrs. Mary Godwyn of Lyme Regis in 1665 (see ante, pp. 70-71), and 
whose widow became the wife of Mr. Edmund Greenleaf, as there shown. 
The Nathaniel Duncan whom Mr. Jurdain also calls son in law was also without 
doubt our Nathaniel Duncan of New England, wdio had sons Peter and Nathan- 
iel, just as appears in will of Mrs. Elizabeth Jurdain of Exeter (1633). Note 
too that the Kcredge family of Lyme Regis are also connected with this family 
(see will of Mrs. Godwyn also). Just what relationship John Cogan of Boston 
in New England, or rather his wife and children, bore to Ignatius Jurdain I can- 
not say, bqt he seems to have given two powers of attorney to demand and 
receive legacy or legacies under Mr. Jurdain's (or Jordan's) will (see Lechford's 
Note-Book, pp. 148 and 310. I give the references to the printed book, ignor- 
ing that exasperating index at the end of the volume). See Vis : of London for 
pedigree of Baskervill. Ignatius Jurdain was adm. to Wadham Coll., Oxf., 
1625, and succeeded Adam Harsnet as Vicar of Cranham, Essex. 2 Sept. 1639, 
his uncle Baskervill being patron. Henry F. Waters.] 



;> 



James Hili, of Lyme Regis Dorset, merchaut, 10 May 1620, proved 
5 May 1621. The poor of Lyme Regis. To my sou James Hill ten 
pounds. To my son Benjamin all that part of my house in Curnb street 
in Lyme Regis in which he now dwelleth and the little garden now like- 
wise in his occupation for the term of four score and ten years, if he so 
long shall live. I give him in money twenty pounds and also those six 
silver spoons which I bought of him; and I do forgive and discharge him 



"^1 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1075 

from the payment of such money as he doth owe me. To James Hill, sou 
of Benjamin, twenty pounds. To the other four children of my said son 
Benjamin, twenty marks apiece, viz 1 , to Anne. Elizabeth, Jane and Benja- 
min, to be bestowed and employed for their good until their several ages of 
one and twenty years or days of marriage. I do give unto my son 'William 
Hill twenty shillings. To my daughter Sarah Fry twenty pounds and to 
her three children, Tristram. William and Mary, twenty pounds apiece. To 
my daughter Mary Hill two hundred pounds, within one year uext after 
my decease. To my daughter Judith a silver spoon. To my said son 
Benjamin all my wearing apparel (except my best gown). All the rest of 
my lands, goods and chattels not formerly given I do give and bequeath 
unto my " sonne in Lawes " William Frye and William Kirridge whom I 
do heieby ordain and appoint to be my whole executors &c. John Cogins 
the elder a witness. Dale, 35. 

[The above will ought to be read in connection with the Jurdain wills here 
given and that of Mrs. Mary Godwyn referred to iu previous note. 

H. F. "Waters.] 

Joan Griffin of the County of High Nockect in the River Ausemund 
in the Country of Virginia and now being in St. Ollave's parish near Lon- 
don and intending, by the permission of God, very suddenly to pass over 
for Virginia in the good ship called the Margaret of London, whereof under 
God Mr Robert Fox goeth as commander, 20 July 1660, proved 19 April 
1661. David, son of George, Griffin (at twenty one). Robert Griffin, 
another son (at twenty one). Thomas Griffin, another (at twenty one). 
Richard Griffin, a fourth son of the said George, towards the keeping of 
him at school, and after my decease when he shall accomplish the age of 
twenty and one years my whole will and intent is that my whole plantation 
in the County of Warisquick in the Land of Virginia &c. shall be to and 
for the only use and behoof of him the said Richard Griffith (sic.) and his 
heirs, executors, administrators and assigns. To Margaret, Mary and 
Rebecca Griffin, the three daughters of the aforesaid George Griffin, at 
twenty one or days of marriage. I make the said George Griffin my sole 
executor; and I likewise make and ordain James Mansfeild of the parish 
of St. Ollaves in Southwark, mariner, to be an overseer. Proved by George 
Griffin. May, 57. 

David Griffin of Basinghall Street, London, citizen and tallowchand- 
ler, 11 November 1679, proved 12 December 1679. To my sister Kathe- 
rine Sprigg, widow, for life, the rent of a house and orchard at Stratford 
Bridge in County of Glocester, aud after her decease to my nephew John 
Griffin, son of my late brother John Griffin deceased. To my said nephew 
John a house aud orchard near Packenhalls-tithing, Glocestershire. My 
brother in law John Hobbs and sister Elizabeth his wife aud her two chil- 
dren John and Thomas Ilewett. My sister Katherine Sprigg's four children 
Thomas, Abraham, Katherine and Joane. To my brother Samuel Griffin 
in Virginia forty shillings for a ring to wear in remembrance of me. 
Brother in law John Hobbs to be executor. King, 161. 

Commission issued 35[?] November 1689 to Lydia Tonstall (v^ife of 
Thomas Tonstall) niece on the sister's side and next akin to Eliza: Griffin, 
lately of Virginia in the parts beyond the seas, widdow deceased, to admin- 
ister her goods ike. Admon. Act Book (1689) L. 184. 



1076 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Edmoxd Welde of Sudbury, Suffolk, mercer, 5 December 1605, pro.ved 
3 May 1G08. I give and bequeath unto Amye my right well beloved wife 
my mansion house wherein I do now inhabit and dwell, in the parish of 
St. Peter in Sudbury, to hold for life; and after her decease I give the 
moiety and one part thereof (i.e.) the shop, the chamber over it, the ware- 
house &c. to Daniel Welde my eldest son ; the other part of the messuage, 
being the West side thereof, I give to John Welde my second son. To the 
said Daniel fifty pounds at five aud twenty years of age and to Johu forty 
pounds (at same age). To Edmund my third sou my tenements aud houses 
which I purchased of Mr. John Howe, in the parish of St. Gregory, to have 
aud to hold after he shall be of the full age of four and twenty years. To 
Thomas my fourth sou a piece of arable laud of six acres in Great Cornard 
called Church Croftes, at four aud twenty. To Benjamin my fifth son a 
piece of arable laud of five acres which I purchased of Peter Greene gen 1 , 
being parcel of the mauor of Neale's, lying in a field near the clay pits in 
the parish of St. Peter in Sudbury, abutting upon the way leading from 
Sudbury towards Great Waldiugfield, to have and to hold at his age of 
four and twenty. I give to Joseph my sixth son my piece of meadow in 
Cornerd and Sudbury containing two acres and three roods which was some 
time Richard Eden's gen 1 and abutteth upon the high way leading from 
Sudbury towards Corueard right against a certain lane called Cats Lane. 
To James my seventh son my messuage or tenement with a croft of land 
belonging of one acre and half in North Lopham Norfolk which I purchased 
of John Lovick. To my eldest daughter Mary Welde fifty pounds at two 
and twenty. To my youngest daughter Elizabeth my two tenements which 
I purchased of John Drewe, in Balington Essex, and an acre of land called 
Stumpcrosse in Cornard. Amye my wife to be sole executrix and my 
brother John Dereslye to be supervisor. William Howe aud Robert Buck- 
stone witnesses. Windebanck, 42. 

[This will I found many years ago and gave it to some member of the Weld 
family in America. Whether it has ever been printed I do not know. 

H. F. W. 

Mr. Waters communicated the will to Rev. Charles R. Weld, of Baltimore, 
Md. Mr. J. Edward Weld, of New York City, is at present collecting genea- 
logical material of the Welds in this country and in England.— H. E. W.] 

Giles Boadman of Cambridge in the diocese of Ely 28 September 1604, 
proved 17 October 1604. My body to be buried in the church of All 
Hallows, Cambridge. To wife Elizabeth a hundred pounds and the lease 
of the house I now dwell in, with all the household stuff &c. (the wares 
and other things in my shop, with the hairs and timber, excepted). I give 
her my tenement, messuage, burgage or cottage, with the croft adjoining, 
in Ickelton, in Greeu Street there, iu the County of Cambridge. All the 
rest of my goods &c, my debts paid and funerals discharged, I give unto 
Robert Browne and Andrew Boadmau, my brothers, whom I make execu- 
tors. 

Proved by Robert Browne, one of the executors, power reserved to grant 
commission to Andrew Boadman the other executor named &c. 

II arte, 81. 

IIelline (afterwards written Helliuer) Browne of Cambridge iu the 
County of Cambridge, widow, 11 November 1616, proved 22 January 1616. 
I give and bequeath unto Robert Browne, my son, besides the house which 
his father formerly by will gave unto him, the sum of two hundred pounds, 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1077 

to be paid uuto Mr. Oliver Greuough of Nanby in Lincolnshire, within 
three years after my decease, to the use of my said son Robert. To son 
Andrew Browne two hundred pounds over and above the hundred given 
him by his father, to be paid (as above) within two years after my decease. 
To son Samuel (a similar bequest). The said Oliver Grenough to be 
"gurdenier" unto my said three children. To my son John Browne two 
hundred pounds, to be paid unto him withiu six years after my decease. 
A similar bequest to sou William. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my brother Andrewe Bordeman the sum 
of five pounds. To Thomas Jury five pouuds. To Alice Foote, the wife 

of Foote, one of my best gowns. To the poor of Bennett parish 

in Cambridge twenty shillings, to be bestowed at the day of my burial. To 
him that shall preach for me at my funeral ten shillings. All the rest of 
my goods, whatsoever they be, uubequeathed I give aud bequeath unto 
Mr. Johu Jackesonue and Mr. Robert Birder, my sons in law, whom I 
make executors. Andrew Bordman and Thomas Jewry were witnesses. 

The executors named in the will renounced and commission issued (at 
above date) to John Atkiusou aud Thomas Jewrie. Weldon, 3. 

Andrewe Bordman of Cambridge in the County of Cambridge, baker, 
10 February 1616, proved 19 April 1617. I give to my eldest son Richard 
Bouidman forty pounds to be paid unto him at his age of one and twenty 
years. I give unto my son Andrewe Bordman forty pouuds, to be paid 
unto him at his age of one and twenty. I give unto my son Thomas Bord- 
man forty pouuds to be paid uuto him at his age of one and twenty years. 
I give unto my son William Bordman forty pounds, to be paid unto him in 
like sort at his age of one and twenty years. And if it please God that 
any of my aforesaid four children, viz* Richard, Andrewe, Thomas and 
William Bordman do depart this life before they or any of them shall attain 
to their several ages of one and twenty years then my will is that he or they 
surviving shall be the others' heir. I give to my loving wife Rebecca 
Bordman my house in fee simple, which I purchased of Thomas Reade of 
Cambridge, carpenter, to have and enjoy the same during her life; and after 
her decease the foresaid tenement or house to be equally divided amongst 
my foresaid four sons, or so many of them as shall be theu living after her 
death. All the rest of my goods and chattells unbequeathed I give and 
bequeath unto my said wife Rebecca Bordman, whom I do ordain and con- 
stitute my sole and only executrix of this my last will and testament; and 
she to pay my debts and to see my body decently buried. 

Weldon, 31. 

[The above is a larger abstract than was given by Emmerton aud Waters In 
1880. The two wills preceding this have been gathered since 1883. It is alto- 
gether probable that Giles Boadman was the father of Andrewe Bordman (both 
of Cambridge, England) and that the latter was the father of our William 
Bordman of Cambridge, New England. H. F. Waters. 

To the will of Andrew Bordman in Emmerton, and Waters's Gleanings, pp. 
12-13, is appended this note : " The above testator was undoubtedly the father 
of William Bordman of Cambridge in New England, who came over in the ship 
John, of London, in 1G38, was steward of the'collcge, and died in Cambridge 
in March, 1G85, aged seventy-three years. His son, Andrew Bordman, was 
steward of the college, and died 15 July, 1GS7, aged forty-two years. 

" Mrs. Rebecca Bordman, widow of the testator, took for a second husband, 
Stephen Day, a locksmith of Cambridge, England, who, coming over to New 
England with his wife and step-son William (as above), became the earliest 
printer on this side of the ocean (sav* Savage), and died 22 December, 1668. 
His wife had died 27 October, 1659."'] 



1078 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Humphrey Trafford of Trafford, Lancashire, Esq, but now residing 
in the City of York, 5 June 1779, proved in the Prerogative Court of York 
17 July 1779 and at London 27 July 1779. Wife Elizabeth. Real estate 
at Salford, Lancashire, heretofore belonging to her or coming to me in her 
right or under any conveyance made by her or her family. The picture of 
her late brother Sir John Moseley. My estates at Trafford. My dwelling 
house in York. Real estate in Cheshire. Cousin John Trafford of Cros- 
ton, Lancashire, Esq. My two sisters Ann Barnes of Derby, widow, and 
Elizabeth Yates, widow. My three nieces, the daughters of the said Eliza- 
beth Yates, namely Ann Ashton, now the wife of Henry Nooth Esq., Major 
in the 4th Reg* of Dragoon Guards, Mary, now the wife of John Aspinal 
Esq., Sergeant at Law, and Catherine, now the wife of James Campbel 
Esq., an Advocate in Scotland. My mansion at Spaldiugton. Pictures of 
my grandfather and grandmother, Sir Ralph Ashton and his lady, now at 
Trafford. I give to my relation Mr. Thomas Trafford of Cecil Street, 
Strand, London, wine merchant, and to Elizabeth Trafford his sister one 
thousand pounds apiece. My body to be iuterred in the family vault at 
St. Nicholas Chapel adjoining Manchester Church. Warburton, 326. 

Thomas Trafford of Cecil Street, Strand, Middlesex, gentleman, 13 
December 1783, proved 10 January 1784. To Mrs. Elizabeth Trafford, 
widow of Humphrey Trafford, late of Trafford, Lancashire Esq., one mourn- 
ing diamond riug of ten guineas value. The rest of my personal estate to 
be,sold and the produce invested in the purchase of Four per Cent Bank 
Annuities or other Gov 1 Securities and held in trust, the interest to be paid 
to my sister Ann Trafford during her life. After her decease I bequeath 
the whole of the principal (and accrued interest) to the eldest surviving son 
of my dear brother William Trafford, late residing at Livingston's Manor 
in the Province of New York in North America, for his sole use and benefit; 
but if there should be no son of my said brother surviving at the time of 
my death then I give the same to the eldest son of any son of my said 
brother William who should then be living; if no son then to eldest daugh- 
ter &c. My sister Ann Trafford and Thomas Quale of Princes Court 
Westminster, gen 1 , to be executrix and executor. 

Proved by Ann Trafford, spinster, power reserved to grant probate to 
Thomas Quayle Esq. Rockingham, 52. 

Elizabeth Trafford of the City of York widow, 4 January 1785, 
proved 23 November 178G. Lands &c. in Salford, Lancashire. My rela- 
tion George Leycester of Toft in Cheshire Esq. Lands in Rollestou and 
Annesley, Staffordshire. Oswald Mosley Esq. eldest son of Sir John Par- 
ker Mosley of Ancoats, Lancashire, Bar'. My relation Saint Andrew 
Warde of Ilooton Pagnell, Yorkshire, Esq. My relation Mrs. Ann Traf- 
ford of Chelsea near London. Catherine Eleanora Campbell and Sarah 
Campbell the two daughters of Robert Campbell of Askuish or Lochgarr 
House, Argyleshire in North Britain, Esq. My relations Mrs Letitia 
Thornhagh and Mrs. Sarah Thornhagh, both of York. My god daughter 
Elizabeth Mosley, daughter of Sir John Parker Mosley. My relation the 
Rev d Oswald Leycester, clerk, brother of the said George Leycester. My 
relations Susannah and Elizabeth Watts, daughters of the late Mr. John 
Watts of Leicestershire, gen 1 , deceased. John Trafford of Trafford Esq., 
Mrs. Trafford his wife (and others). My body to be buried near the 
remains of my late dear husband Humphrey Trafford Esq. in the Family 
Vault in St. Nicholas Chapel adjoining Manchester Church. The said S' 
Andrew Warde to be sole executor. Norfolk, 591. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1079 

Ann Trafford of Beaufort Row Chelsea, Middlesex, spinster, 1 July 
1784. proved 11 September 1788. My liouse in Green Street Grosvenor 
Square. My executors Sir James Nicolson, Baronet, and Mr. Thomas 
Quayle of Princes Court. My brother William Trafford, now or late resid- 
ing at Ancram in Livingston's Manor near Albany in North America, and 
his children. A legacy bequeathed to my late brother Thomas. 

Calvert, 461. 

[Tor the references to the foregoing Trafford wills I am indebted to Mr. TV. 
H. B. Bird, who asks for any notes that may be furnished about the family. I 
understood Mr. Bird to say that he could not place this line in the Trafford 
pedigree. H. F. W.] 

Thomas Snelling, clerk, vicar of Bridgerule, 30 May 1639, proved 11 
August 1642. The poor of Bridgerule and the poor of Launcells. To- 
wards the augmentation or enlarging of the Communion Cup of the parish 
of Bridgerule I do give and bequeath forty shillings sterling. My daugh- 
ters Elizabeth, Margaret and Joane Snelling. Lands called little Torrage 
in Plimpton St. Mary's, Devon, which I hold by the demise and grant of 
Sir Richard Strode knight. Margaret my wife. My brother Emanuell 
Snelling. My sister Welthian Alley and her children by Francis Alley. 
My sister Florence Lapp. I give unto my brother William Snelling one 
of my best books such as he shall make choice of. My wife Margaret to 
be sole executrix and my brother in law Francis Fortescue of Wood Esq., 
my cousin Christopher Martin of Plimton Earl gen 1 , Richard Galbert 
(Gilbert?) of Bridgerule gen 1 and Richard Veale to be overseers. 

Cambell, 105. 

[See Foster's Alumni Oxonienses, Early Series, Vol. 4, p. 13S7.— W. K. W.] 

Frances Snelling the younger of Chadlewood, Devon, spinster, 29 
November 1653, proved 6 November 1655. My estate of inheritance by 
descent as one of the cousins and coheirs of Francis Snelling Esq. deceased, 
my nephew. My sister Jane Snelling and Christopher Martin Esq. her 
intended husband. My mother Frances Snelling, widow. My sisters 
Mary Perriman and Joue Treby. My nephews Arthur Perriman, John 
Furse and James Perriman. My niece Frances Perriman. My aunts the 
Lady Elizabeth Davies, Agnes Heale and Susan lzaacke. Tlie poor of 
Plimpton St. Mary. Certain servants. Sister Jane Snelling to be sole 
executrix. John Davie one of the witnesses. Aylett, 191. 

[John 1 Snelling of Plympton, St. Mary, Devon, Eng., d. 8 May, 1529; his son 
and heir was William 2 . His grandson Robert 3 of Chadlewood d. 12 March, 
1570, and by wife Nichola Shinning had Emanuel, 4 William 4 and Robert. 4 Wil- 
liam 4 of Chadlewood m. Jane, clau. of Edmond Specott of Thornborowe. Their 
son Thomas, 6 bur. 11 Nov., 1644, at Plympton, St. Mary, mar. Joane Elford, and 
had John, 6 Thomas, 6 Emanuel 6 , William, 6 Jane, 6 Wethian, 8 Mary, 6 Joane. 6 Doro- 
thy, 6 Florence. 6 John 6 m. Frances, dan. of Walter Hcle of G >aton, and had, 
anions; other daughters, Frances, 7 bapt. 10 March, 1610; bur. 7 Oct., 1055, at 
Plympton, St. Mary. Her will is given above. Her uncle William 6 came to 
Newbury and was a physician; on 13 Oct., 1654, he purchased a house, garden 
and orchard in Boston. His Avifc was Margery, eldest dan. of Giles Stagg of 
Southwark, whom he mar. 5 July, 1648. Their children were William, 7 b. 24 
June. 1641); Ann, 7 b. 2 March, 1652, d. young; Ann, 7 b. 7 May, 1654. The wife 
d. 18 June, 1C07, age 46, and is buried in Copps' Hill. 

The will of William 6 is proved at Boston, 1674, and in it he states his relation- 
ship to Thomas* as " the youngest sou of the late Thomas Snelling of Chaddle- 
wood." The seal he used has" the arms of the Devon family — " A rg., three 
griffins' heads erased Gu., a chief ermine" — with a mullet as a mark of cadency, 
this denoting his being a descendant of a third -on (probably his grandfather), 



1080 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

as his brother John, 8 in his pedigree of the family in 1620 (Harl. MSS. 1163, 
folio 109), calls him fourth son of Thomas.* This John, 6 father of Frances, 7 
before mentioned, could not have been the settler in New England, as suggested 
by Mr. Augustus T. Perkins, in the Heraldic Journal, vol. ii. p. 11 ; or the set- 
tler at Saco, 1653, as given by Savage, as he was buried 28 Dec, 1639, at Plymp- 
ton, St. Mary. 

There has also been credited to Dr. William 6 a brother Joseph, who nowhere 
appears in the English pedigree. Other wills of this family would show 
beyond question whether the identity of the father of Dr. William* is as given 
above. 

Ann, 7 dau. of Dr. William, m. Frances Daveuport, mariner, of Boston. 
Their eldest dau. Margaret mar. James Gooding, jun., of Noddle's Island, 
and they had Eichard Gooding, b. 18 Oct., 1700. 

Ann Davenport m. Thomas Russell 5 Sept., 1700, and had William, b. 4 Mav, 
1701; Ann, b. 15 Nov., 1702; Thomas, b. 1 Sept., 1705; Ann, b. 7 Oct., 1706; 
Sarah, b. 7 July, 1709. 

William 7 Snelling, son of Dr. William, 6 d. 1678, and doubtless practiced as a 
physician, as Sewall mentions, under date 3 Sept., 1676, sending to Dr. Snelling 
for professional advice. 

By the marriage of Dr. William's daughters, and through their children, there 
were doubtless descendants of Dr. William, though Savage states there were 
none. 

Bridgman, in his Copps' Hill, gives John* as the father of a Thomas who emi- 
grated to America (1640-1650), with an English pedigree. 

(See Vivian's Visitations of Devon, p. 694; Tuckett's Devon Pedigrees, p. 21; 
Earleian Society, vol. vi. p. 266.) — Walter K. Watkins.] 

Makke Pierce of London 10 Februarj 7 1654, proved 3 June 1G56. 
Forty pounds in hand of Master Robert Newman citizen and vintner of 
London. Goods which I carry with me to Ireland. Certain goods which 
are already in Ireland in the hands of one Master William Swann at Mas- 
ter Ludlowe's house in Dublin. Certain goods in the hands of Master 
Samuel Caffinch. Ten pounds in money in the hands of Elizabeth Higgiu- 
son, widow, which I lent to her deceased husband Theophilus Higgiuson in 
New England and ought to have been paid presently at our arrival in 
England, as by a bill of his hand appeareth. All the said money (and the 
goods being first sold and put into money) first I bequeath unto Master 
Devenport pastor to the church in Newhaven in New England forty shillings 
and to my beloved friend Master Robert Newman abovenamed twenty 
shillings and to my beloved friend M r . William Viner twenty shillings, to 
Rebecca and Anne Doue, the daughters of my brother in law Fromabove 
Doue, each ten shillings. The rest of my estate I give to Samuel, Eliza- 
beth and Dorothy Brooke, the children of my deceased sister Sarah Brooke, 
and Libia Edyer, the daughter of my deceased sister Jane Ellis, and Samuel 
Peirce, Marke Peirce, Deborah Peirs and Sarah Peirs, the children of my 
brother Henry Peirce, to be equally divided amongst them by even portions. 
Friends Master William Vyner, citizen and joiner of London, and Master 
Robert Newman abovenamed to be my executors. 

Then follows an interesting schedule of goods (carried to Ireland). 

Berkley, 233. 

[Mark Pierce in 1642 owned an estate at the N. E. corner of Holyoke and 
Mt. Auburn streets, in Cambridge, Mass., the next year removing to New 
Haven, at which place he was known as a public surveyor and teacher of a pri- 
vate school. Previously, in 1639, he is found there on a list of those subscrib- 
ing to a fundamental agreement. In 1643 he is on a rate list, and also fined one 
shilling, with Theophilus Higgiuson and others, for being late at training. He 
took the oath of fidelity 1 July, 1044; he was appointed to view meadows 16 
June, 1645, and assigned a seat in the meeting-house 10 March, 1646-7. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1081 

Robert Newman was doubtless that one who came in the Mary and John, and 
removed to New Haven, where he was a deacon of the church, and had two 
daughters baptized (in 1642 and 1646) ; some years before the date of the above 
will he returned to England. 

Theophilus Higgiuson, son of Rev. Francis and Ann Higgiuson, lived in New 
Haven, where he died at the age of 37 years, leaving one son, Samuel.— W. K. 
Watkins.] 

William Bdrrell of Virginia, planter, 4 July 1648, proved 5 August 
1648. My sister Anne Karrnihill (Carmicbael ?) her two youngest daugh- 
ters. My* brother John Burrell. My brother in law Richard Kelly to be 
sole executor. Essex, 126. 

George Scott citizen and grocer of London, 8 May 1645, proved 22 
February 1648. To be buried in the parish church of Seavenoke in the 
Co. of Kent in a grave to be made jn the ground within a vault which I 
lately caused to be made at the upper end of the South He of the Chancel 
for the laying of the body of my late dear mother and such otbers of her 
posterity as shall desire to be buried there. To the Company of Grocers 
of the City of London, whereof I am a member, my greatest standing cup 
and cover of silver, all gilt, containing about thirty and three ouuces, with 
case thereunto belonging. By deed of 5 February, 10 th Charles, I bought 
of Thomas Lock of Cranworth, Norfolk, clerk, and Mary his wife an 
annuity or yearly rent charge of seaven pounds to be paid unto me, the said 
George Scott, and Elizabeth my wife and to be issuing and going out of 
all that large house or Inn called the Bull, sometimes two tenements &c, 
in the parish of Sevenocke, now in the tenure of John Sole, innholder. 
Provision for fifteen two penny loaves of wheateu or household bread of a 
day old to be distributed amongst such poor of the village or precinct of 
Rethered ah Riverhead frequenting divine service every Sunday morning 
as shall be nominated by the tenant for the time being that shall dwell in 
my manor house called Brook's Place at Riverhead als Rethered. My lov- 
iag sister Mrs Ann Hay and my loving cousins Herbert Hay and Ann 
Bryan. My loving niece Ann Brace. To my loving brother Edmond 
Scott my great seal ring of gold. I give one hundred pounds, to be paid at 
the end of two years after my decease unto my loving cousin Humphrey 
Scott of Congerhurst in Kent Esq. towards the repair of his mansion house 
called Congerhurst. In case my brother Edmond doth happen to die leav- 
ing Mary his wife, George and Edward his sons and Grace his daughter 
to survive him, I give to each of them ten pounds yearly. I have sub- 
scribed and paid into the Chamber of London one hundred and twenty 
five pounds towards the reducing of the Irish rebels according to the several 
Acts of Parliament in that case made and provided. I give to George, 
Edward and Grace Scott, the three children of my brother Edmond, all my 
freehold or other lands, tenements, plantations, goods &c. in Martin's Hun- 
dred or elsewhere in the kingdom or dominion of Virginia. Other goods 
&c. to the children of my niece Anne Brace, daughter of my brother 
Richard Scott deceased. My cousin Thomas Brace her husband to be sole 
executor. (Among witnesses was Edward Phillips parish clerk of Mary 
Woollchurch, London.) Fairfax, 23. 

Barbara Cabot of the town and County of Southampton, widow, 17 
April 1776, with a codicil dated 12 June 1776, another dated 29 August 
1776, another dated 7 October 1776, another dated 1 November 1776 and 



1082 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

another dated 8 November 177G, proved 15 October 1777. To my brother 
Robert Cooper of St Ann's Street in the City of New Sarum three thou- 
sand pounds, together with my chariot and horses, in case he will be pleased 
to accept them, and all my pictures and portraits in the fore parlour of my 
present dwelling house. To my sister Ann Barnes three thousand pounds 
subject to the payment thereout of one clear annuity of twenty pounds to 
her daughter Ann Barnes during her natural life. To my sister Mary 
Cooper of Milford Street in the said city of New Sarum three thousand 
pounds (and certain silver and other goods). To Mr Stephen Higginson 
of Salem in New England, a relation of my late husband Francis Cabot 
deceased, the full sum of three thousand pounds, together with a pair of 
silver candlesticks and snuffers marked ff. C. in a cypher, a silver handed 
cup, a silver bowl and silver tankard and also the portraits of my late said 
husband and myself; all which I desire may be paid and transmitted to 
him with the soonest safety and convenience after my decease. And in 
case of the death of the said Stephen Higginson in my life time then I 
give and bequeath the said money and other articles to all and every of his 
children then living or whereof his wife shall be " ensient." Also I give 
to Susanna the wife of the said Stephen Higginson my diamond hoop ring 
and to him the said Stephen my late husband's gold watch ; and in case of 
his death then to his children. To Robert and George Cooper, sons of my 
late nephew Robert Cooper, five hundred pounds apiece at twenty one. To 
my nephew William Barnes three hundred pounds due me on mortgage 
from Mr Thomas Moody. My niece Mary Barnes. Mr Eldniund Moody 
of Southampton gen 1 . Mrs Rebecca Held of New Sarum widow. My 
cousin Mr Richard Wythe of Warminster, Attorney at Law, and his brother 
Mr John Wythe. Mrs Alice Gough, wife of Capt. Gough of New Sarum. 
To my brother in law Mr William Barnes of Bristol and my brother in law 
Mr Robert Cooper of Milford Street aforesaid and my sister in law Eliza- 
beth the wife of my brother Robert Cooper fifty pounds apiece for mourn- 
ing. Mrs Elizabeth Hewett wife of the Rev d . Mr Hewett of Wilton. My 
niece Sarah the wife of the Rev d . Dr. Baker. Mrs Falkiugham the wife of 
Admiral Falkingham, Mrs Hook the widow of Col. Hook, Mrs Le Gay the 
widow of Mr Charles Le Gay, Mrs Frances and Dorothy Clutterbuck and 
Mrs Webb wife of M r . Charles Webb, all of Southampton. A cabinet of 
my own japanning. My honored father Robert Cooper to be residuary 
legatee and sole executor. 

In the third Codicil mention made of niece Mary Barnes, now the wife 
of Raleigh Colbourne. Reference to brother Robert Cooper and brother 
in law Robert Cooper. The said Mary Rashleigh (sic). 

Proved by Robert Cooper Esq. sole executor. Collier, 412. 

[Stephen Higginson, born 31 July, 1716; died 12 Oct. 1761; married 22 April 
1743, Elizabeth, b. 8 March, 1710, daughter of John and Anna Orne Cabot, and 
had: Stephen, b. 28 Nov. 1743; died in Boston 22 Nov. 1828; m, Susan, b. 
1736, d. 1788, daughter of Aaron and Susanna (Porter) Cleveland. They had : 
Barbara Cooper, b. 15 Jan. 1774, who m. Samuel Gardner Perkins of Boston, 
and their daughter Barbara Perkins m. Walter Channing, M.D. 

John, George and Francis Cabot came from the Island of Jersey. 

Francis was a merchant in Salem, from which he disappears; he is probably 
the husband of the testator. — Walter K. Watkins.] 

William Lloyd of the parish of Redcliffe in the City of Bristol, mari- 
ner, 22 November 1672, proved 26 February A. D. (Stylo Anglias) 1675. 
I give, devise and bequeath my house, lands, tenements and hereditaments 



B 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1083 

&c. iu Newport and Rode-Islund in New England in America to my daugh- 
ter Sarah Smiton to hold for life, remainder to her four children that she 
now hath, forever, by equal shares and parts. My tenement and lands in 
Almondisbury and Olveston which I purchased of John Baugh, white tawer, 
for ninety nine years, if Alice, my wife, my son and daughter John Lloyd 
and Mary Butler, or any of them, so long live, I do ratify and confirm such 
grant and settlements as I have made of one third part thereof on my said 
son, his marriage. My term and interest in the other two thirds I give to 
my said daughter Mary Butler and my other daughter Joane Dapwell, my 
wife enjoying the same so long as she shall live. The fore part of the 
messuage wherein I live, in Redcliff Street I give to my daughter Mary 
Butler ^the same which she now holds). My grand daughter Martha But- 
ler, daughter of the said Mary. My wife, Mary Butler's mother. My son 
Richard Lloyd and my grandson Richard Lloyd, his son. My daughter 
Joyce Williams wife of Joseph Williams and my grandson Thomas Wil- 
liams, their son. My eldest son William Lloyd and his five children. 
Wife Alice to be executrix. Son John Lloyd's daughter Anne. Sons in 
law Robert Dapwell and Joseph Williams to be overseers. Bence, 19. 

[William Smiton was of Portsmouth, R. I., and died in 1671 ; his widow Sarah 
died in 1709. Their children were Sarah, who married William Brownell, Ben- 
jamin, married Elizabeth Bonham, and Benjamin's son Benjamin in 1728 was 
of Bristol (R. I.) having been formerly of Barbados.— Walter K. Watkins.] 

James Lloyd of Boston in New England, merchant, 10 April 1684, 
proved 5 April 1696. I am the right and lawful owner of a certain tract 
of land on Long Island, near the town of Osterbay, known by the name of 
Horseneck, and also two thirds of a neck of meadow to the South side of 
Long Island called Fort neck. One half of the same, with one half of its 
produce and income, I give unto my dear wife Grizzell Lloyd, for the term 
of her life, and after her decease to our children then living, equally to be 
shared. They shall have liberty, when of age, to dispose of their parts, 
each to other or to my brother Joseph Lloyd. The other half of Horse- 
neck and meadow which I bought of Thomas Hart's attorneys I give, with 
its produce and incomes, to our daughter Grizzell and son James and to 
what other child and children it shall please God to give us. Wife Griz- 
zele Lloyd and uncle Francis Brinley and Mr John Nelson to be my execu- 
trix and executors. Bond, 66. 

[James Lloyd, born in England about 1650, married, about 1670, Grizzell or 
Grizelda, daughter of Nathaniel Sylvester of Shelter Island, aud died 21 August, 
1693. His children, by first wife, were Henry, Joseph and Grizzcl. He mar- 
ried, second, 3 Nov.. 1691, Rebecca, daughter of Gov. John Leverett and Sarah 
Sedswick; they had a daughter Rebecca, who became the wife of James Oliver, 
of Boston. 

The will of James Lloyd is No. 2071 in Suffolk Probate Files, and with it are 
petition and letter regarding support of infant daughter of James and Rebecca 
Llovd. The letter isljy Francis Brinlev, of Newport, called uncle by the testa- 
tor; he was son of Thomas Brinley, of Datchett, Buckinghamshire, England, 
and his sister Grizzell married Nathaniel Sylvester, father of the first wife of 
James Lloyd. 

John Nelson of Boston, the other executor at the death of the testator, was a 
prisoner in Quebec and later at the Chateau d'Angoulome in France and the 
Bastile. Henry, son of James Lloyd, married his daughter Rebecca. 

Walter K. Watkins.] 

John Lewis of the Island of Nevis merchant, 21 December 1699, 
proved 9 July 1701. To my sister Elizabeth Lewis and to her heirs one 






1084 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

three pint silver tankard marked ou the handle I: L:, six silver forks and 
silver spoons and two silver porringers marked I: L :, as also five guineas 
and one knobed gold ring. To my loving father Thomas Lewis forty 
pounds sterling. Item I give and bequeath unto my kinswoman Grisell 
Lloyd daughter of James Lloyd of New England ten pounds currant 
money there to be paid her immediately after the news of my death by order 
of my executor. Mary Gurney the daughter of John Gurney. To James 
Taylor my silver hilted sword. My friends Arthur Plomer and William 
Ling, both of the island of Nevis, merchants, to be my executors in trust to 
take care of all my concerns in this island and remit my estate and effects 
to my executor. Mr Henry Lloyd, merchant in Bristol, to be sole execu- 
tor. Thomas Nowell one of the witnesses. Dyer, 99. 

Elisha Bennett of Rumney Marsh 9 April 1726, proved 30 May 1727. 
To wife Dorothy all my estate, real and personal, at Rumney Marsh and at 
Boston, during her life; and after her decease to my sons and daughter 
John Bennett, Elis Bennett and Sarah Viall, equally to be divided, and my 
wife to be buried out of my estate. And my wife shall sell my wooden 
house at Boston to defray charges. I give to my grandson John Bennett 
at New York one hundred pounds, to my grandson Samuel Viall one hun- 
dred pounds, at my wife's decease, quitting all Nathaniel Viall's debts due 
to me. My brick house at Boston to be brought in with the rest of my 
estate. 

Commission issued (at above date) to Henry Palmer attorney for Doro- 
thy Bennett the widow &c. 

Commission issued 16 January 1733 to John Bennett the son, the widow 
Dorothy Bennet having died. Farrant, 108. 

[The testator's ancestor, Samuel Bennett, came in the "James" from Lon- 
don in 1635, aged 24 years, and settled at Lynn, where in 1638 he had twenty 
acres granted him. He owned a corn mill there, which he sold in 1653 ; by occu- 
pation he was a house carpenter, as we find he was proceeded against by Richard 
Chadwell, shipwright in 1641, for slocking or enticing away his apprentice 
John Sampson. 

In October 1649, Valentine Hill and John Leverett granted six hundred acres 
to Bennett, which had been granted to and purchased of Thomas Fowle, it 
being southward of Capt. Robert Keayne's farm. In 1656 Bennett bargains 
with George Wallis, gent., his farm house at Rumly (Rumney) Marsh, called 
Rumly Hall, with marsh and upland adjoining, and eight acres across the creek 
in Lynn. In 1665 John Gifford, aged 40 years, deposed that about 1663-4 he re- 
ceived a letter from a kinswoman in England, Mrs. Hargrave, living in Horsley 
near London, asking information about the property of Samuel Bennett sen. of 
Lynn, or Boston, and regarding a match with his son Samuel jun. and her daughter; 
and Samuel Bennett sen. said he would settle the estate he dwelt in, on the road 
between Boston and Lynn, the son to allow his father twenty pounds per year 
during life. Samuell Maverick, age 63 years, swore to the same purport re- 
garding Samuel Bennett jun.'s match with the daughter of Capt. William Har- 
grave, of Horsey downs, mariner. 

In 1665 Samuel Bennett, senior, gentleman, and his son Samuel, agree that 
the son receive as marriage portion house at Rumney Marsh, fifty acres of land 
and five hundred acres adjoining, for his use and that of his wife Sarah, dau. 
Capt. William Hargrave. If the son had no male heirs, then the property was 
after the death of the wife Sarah to go to the male heirs of Samuel, senior, 
viz. : John and Elisha Bennett, and their heirs or next of kin. 

Elisha and Dorothy Bennett had in Boston : John, born 4 April, 1698; Ellis, 
born 9 Aug., 1699. Ellis Bennett filed his bond in Suffolk Probate Files, No. 
5249, 18 Dec., 1727, as administrator de bonis non, with the will annexed, of the 
estate of Elisha Bennett, the will having been proved 30 May, 1726, the year 
previous. Walter K. Watkins.] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1085 

Joseph Bdrges now of Marlborough, Wibs, England, merchant, hut 
late of the Province of Maryland, being now again to take a voyage into 
the same Province, 22 October 1G72, proved 27 November 1672. All my 
goods and chattells to my brothers William, .Samuel and Jeremiah and sis- 
ters Anne and Mary- My house and lands in Maryland which I lately 
purchased of Richard Ewens shall be sold and the moneys raised thereby 
divided between my said brothers and sisters. I make and constitute my 
father in law John Keynes of Marlborough aforesaid, gen*, executor. And 
I desire him, forthwith after my decease, to give unto my dear mother (his 
now wife) and to my brothers Mr. Isaac and Daniel Burges and to my sis- 
ter Elizabeth Parker and unto each of them severally one gold ring of 
twenty shillings price, in remembrance of me. And I give my said execu- 
tor twenty shillings to buy him a mourning ring. Eure, 131. 

Thomas Sheppard of the City of Chester, gen 1 , Ensign of the Company 
of Invalids now in garrison in the Castle of Chester, 2 May 1708, proved 
15 November 1709. To my loving niece Mrs. Esther Harris, daughter of 
my late sister Esther Baldwin deceased, all such debts &c. as shall be due 
and unpaid unto me, at my decease, from Hannah Green of Cholton in the 
Co. of Chester, widow, and John Green her son and from Samuel Finlowe, 
of Chester, wetglover, and from each of them severally; and I give and 
devise unto my said niece all the lands and tenements conveyed or assured 
unto me for securing the payment of the said moneys. To niece Elizabeth 
Baldwin, another daughter of my said sister (certain other debts and mort- 
gages). Also I give unto my other niece, daughter of my said late sister 
Baldwin, who married a watchmaker (certain other debts &c.) Bequests 
to the six children of my late nephew Mr. William Baldwin deceased. To 
certain friends named. 

Also I give, devise and bequeath unto my well beloved nephew Thomas 
Sheppard of Bristol, gen 1 , all my messuages, lands, tenements and heredita- 
ments situate, lying and being in the country or territories of New England 
and all my estate, right, title, claim and demand in and to the same, with 
all deeds and writings relating thereunto, and also all my goods and chattels 
in New England. And the residue of my goods &c. I give and bequeath unto 
my said nephew, whom I constitute and appoint sole executor &c. My 
loving friends Mr. John Norbury and Mr. Thomas Fernihaugh to be over- 
seers thereof. Lane, 255. 

Thomas Sheppard late of Bristol but now residing in London, gen*, 
7 March 171G, proved 9 March 1716. Seized, in fee simple or some 
other good estate of inheritance, of and in a certain tract or parcel of land 
and marsh in the Province of Maine in New England, of the quantity of 
about one hundred and thirteen acres, by virtue of a devise or bequest to 
me thereof made by my late deceased uncle Thomas Sheppard of the City 
of Chester, gen 1 , Ensign of the Company of Invalids then in garrison in the 
Castle of Chester, and contained in and by his last will and testament, 
bearing date 2 May 7 Anne, as by the said will and probate thereof may 
appear. I give and devise the said tract, with all the buildings, improve- 
ments &c., unto my loving friend Mr. John Masters, watchmaker, late of 
the said city of Bristol but now also residing in London, to hold to him and 
his heirs forever. The rest of my estate, both real and personal, I give, 
devise and bequeath unto the said John Masters as his own freehold or as 
his own proper woods &c. forever; and I make him sole executor. 

Whitfield, 66. 



1086 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

[Harlakenden Symonds sold 12 Juue, 1688, a tract of laud, six miles long and 
four wide, to some thirty-nine parties among whom was Thomas Sheperd whose 
share was two hundred acres. The tract thus sold was called Coxhall, and 
incorporated as such a century later, 24 April, 1780, and twenty-three years 
later changed to Lyman, in honor of Theodore Lyman, Esq., of Boston. It 
was first settled about 1767. Walter K. Watkins.] 

James Stevenson of Salem in the Province of New England in America, 
gen 1 , 22 October 1726, proved 19 November 1728. To wife Elizabeth all 
my real and personal estate and all my goods &c. as also all my salaries 
and sums of money due or owing to me, leaving to her the sole manage- 
ment and education of my children ; and I appoint her my sole executrix. 

Commission issued (as above) to Jocelyn Dansey, principal creditor, the 
widow having renounced. The testator is described as late of St. Dunstan's 
in the West, London, but at Salem &c. deceased. Brook, 335. 

[Capt. John Shatock of Salem, mariner, granted administration on estate of 
James Stevenson late of Salem, geut., 18 Oct. 1728. 

2 Dec 1735. Thomas Manning gave bond to administer de bonis non on estate 
of James Stevenson late of Salem dec d . Essex Probate Files, No. 26455. 

"Walter K. Watkins.] 

William Taylor of Wapping in the parish of Whitechapel in the 
County of Middlesex, shipwright, 30 April 1657, proved 5 December 1659. 
To my cousin Mary Taylor twenty pounds. To my brother Randolph 
Taylor ten pounds. All the residue, my debts and legacies being first paid 
and satisfied, I give and bequeath unto my very loving brother Owin Tay- 
lor of Wapping, shipwright, whom I make and ordain full and sole execu- 
tor. Pell. 556. 

[Here, I suppose, we have other relatives of Dep. Gov. Francis Willoughby's 
wife. H. F. Waters.] 

Elias Rich of St. Paul Covent Garden, Middlesex, Esq., 29 January 
1719, proved 11 February 1719. To Mrs. Jane Athy four hundred pounds 
and all my household goods, plate, jewels, &c. in my lodgings or elsewhere. 
To Mr. George Alexander, second son of my worthy friend Mr. James 
Alexander of Bedford Street, Covent Garden, mercer, five hundred pounds 
at twenty one, to be placed in the hands of Richard Lloyd, of said parish, 
and placed by him at interest &c, during the minority of the said George. 
To Anne Pitkin and Peter Rich Pitkin, the children of my sister Pitkin 
deceased, one shilling each and no more. To the said Mr. Richard Lloyd 
and George Marriott of St. Paul, Covent Garden, my freehold messuage 
in Broad Street, near the Royal Exchange, and all other my freehold mes- 
suages, lands, &c. to hold during the life of my neice Anne Willis, upon 
trust to pay the rents &c. unto the proper hands of my said neice Anne 
Willis (daughter of my late brother Mr. Edward Rich deceased and now 
the wife o* Mr. Francis Willis, a planter in Virginia) during her natural 
life, and not to the said Francis Willis or any other person she shall inter- 
marry with. After her decease I devise the said messuage and all other 
my freehold estate unto the first son of her body (and so on, by way of 
entail), then to her daughters &c. Failing such issue, then to the said 
Mrs. Jane Athy for life, then to Mrs. Briana Borer, sister of the said Mrs. 
Jane Athy, forever. To the said trustees twenty pounds apiece. The resi- 
due of my personal estate to the said Mrs. Jane Athy, whom I make sole 
executrix. Shaller, 39. 

[This seems fatal to the tradition that Francis Willis married a Lady Rich.] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1087 

John Purefay of Shaldeston, Bucks, Esq. 4 May 1579, proved 25 May 
1579. Wife Anne. My uephew Edward Purefey (again written Pure- 
faye). My nephew aud niece George Purefey and his sister. My cousin 
Thomas Purefey and my cousin Elizabeth, his sister. Nephew Edward 
Purefey, again referred to as "cosin" Edward Purefey. Thomas Wors- 
ley my sister's daughter's son. Every of the children of my cousin Andrew 
Skne (Skerne ?) being at this present five in number. My cousin Robert 
Thome. Mary Worseley and Katherine Worsseley. Thomas Dudley. 
Thomas Strerley. My nephew Edward Thome. Loving friend Peter 
"Wentworthe Esq. Brothers William and Richard Purefey. 

Bakou, 22. 

[This will I have saved on account of the mention in it of a Thomas Dudley 
(see Mr. Dean Dudley's remarks on the possible connection of Purefey and 
Dudley). H. F. W. 

The testator John Purefoy was of Shalston in Bucks., son and heir of Ed- 
ward Pnrefoy of Shireford, Esq. (Leic.) who was born at Effleld, June 13, 1494, 
and died at Shalston, June 1, 1558. Edward, Esq., was son and heir of Nicho- 
las. (See Herald's Visitation, published by Harl. Society, 1869. ) The pedigree 
reaches back to A. D., 1277. John Purefoy of Shalston, the testator in the 
above abstract, was the one mentioned on page 19 of my History of the 
Dudleys. Nicholls's History of Leicestershire says he married, at St. Dunstan's 
in London, Anne, daughter of Thomas Windsor, Esq., of Bentley, son of Sir 
Andrew Windsor, K.C.B., brother of Edmund Dudley's first wife, that is, 
Edmund, father of John Duke of Northumberland. She was his second wife. 
The first wife of the testator, John Purefoy, was Elizabeth Brome, dau. of 
Sir John Brome of Hatton, co. Oxon, Kt. He does not mention any children 
and probably had no descendants. 

The Heralds' Visitation and Nicholls's Leicestershire, give the names of his 
eight brothers and five sisters, making 14 children of Edward Purefoy, Esq., 
and his wife Anne Fettiplace, (dau. of Richard Fettiplace of Bassils-leigh, 
Berks.) born at Shireford Parva July 16, 1496, d. 1568. 

The fourteen children were as follows : 1. John, testator. 2. Thomas, mar- 
ried a daughter of Weuman or Waynman, d. s. p. 3, Richard, who (says the 
Visitation) married "Nicholas Foxton's widow, daughter of Pell." This meaus 
Nicholls of Faxton, daughter of Pell. (See History of Dudley Family, page 
18.) She was dau. of John Pell of Eltington, Northauts., and widow of 
1 homas Nicolls, Esq. One of the Visitations calls him " Nicholas de Pitchley," 
meaning Nicolls of Pitchley (Pightsley) Northauts. He was the father of Sir 
Angnstine Nicolls, of Faxton. Richard Purefoy purchased Faxton manor and 
he and his wife Anne (Pell) both died there. 4. Henry, cl. s.p. 5. Edward, d 
s. p. 6. Nicholas, d. s. p. 7. Charles, cl. s. p. 8. William of Holingbome, 
Kent, b. 1524, d. 1595, aged 71, m. 1st, Beatrix, dau. and heir of Thomas Je 
Chilshurst, widow of Strellev. By her he had two children : i. John, M.A., 
Canon of Christ Church, Oxford, cl. 1601, s. p.; and ii. Thomas, m. Blendina 
Goodwin, dau. of Thomas Goodwin, Bishop of Bath and Wells. William 8 
Purefoy m. 2d, Cecily Goodwin, dau. of John of Bucks, in 1579. They had: 
i. Edward of Shalston. d. 1594, m. Joyce, dau. and heir of George Purefoy of 
Dravton, cl. 1596; ii. John; iii. Thomas; iv. Anne d. young. 9. Francis, m. 
Anne Furthe, dau. of Anthony of Furthe, Northants, and had : i. George, d. 
s. p.; ii. Elizabeth. 10. Mary, m. Thomas Thorne of Yardley, Northauts. 
and had: i. Anthony Thorne; ii. Edward Thorne; iii. Robert Thorne; iv. 
Thorney Thorne; v. Katherine Thorne m. Francis Worsley; and vi. Susanna 
Thorne m. Rogers. 11. Elizabeth, m. Sir Humphrey Bradbourne of Derby- 
shire. 12. Anne, m. Swillington. 13. Susan, a nun of Syou. 14. Frances. 

The testator John Purefoy, in his will here abstracted mentions his wife 
"Anne Windsor," his nephew Edward Purefoy, son of 8 William, his nephew 
and niece George and Elizabeth, children of 9 Francis, his " cousin Thomas Pnre- 
foy and his co'usin Elizabeth his sister." These are the children of his uncle 
Simon Purefoy whose wife was Barbara Dixwell. They were 35 years of age. 
Elizabeth was wife of William Ackworth of Kent. Perhaps they had lived with 
him in their youth. " Cousin Edward Purefoy " might mean his uephew Ed- 



1088 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

■ward's son Edward. "Thomas, Mary and Katharine Worsley " were children 
of Katharine (Thome) Worsley, -wife of Francis Worsley and daughter of Mary 
(Purefoy) Thorne. The children of Andrew Skne (Skerne?) might have been 
his mother's grandchildren. Cousin Robert Thorne, son or grandson of his 
sister Mary. Probably this sentence is to be read, " My cousins Robert Thorne, 
Mary Worsley and Katharine Worsley, Thomas Dudley and Thomas Strelley." 
His "brother William's first wife was an heiress, widow of Strelley. " Nephew 
Edward Thorne" was son of his sister Mary. " Brothers William and Richard 
Purefoy." Richard had no children. He was husband of Judge Nicolls's mother 
at Faxton, Northauts. 

Our Gov. Thomas Dudley was three or four years of age in 1579. It may be 
that he was the Thomas Dudley of the -will and that this was the legacy -which 
was bequeathed him as Mather describes. (See Hist, of Dudley Family, page 
41.) If he was the legatee, his mother was probably a niece of the testator. It 
is quite interesting to see this name " Thomas Dudley," connected with these 
Purefoys, among whom we have been looking for his relations and for facts 
about his mother's family, who were known to have been just such a Puritan 
race, connected with the Nicolls and Pell families. 

The wills of other Pnrefoys may show the nature of his kinship to them all. 
I feel very grateful to Mr. Waters for all his good work. — Dean Dudley.] 

Sir Robert Nadnton, knight, 3 March 1634, with a codicil added 5 
March another 6 March, proved 12 November 1635. To be buried in 
with my ancestors in the chancel at Leatheringham, Suffolk. Wife Dame 
Penelope. Daughter the lady Bayning. My manor of Twiford in Leices- 
tershire. My house at " Pickadilla." My manor and park at Nelmes and 
other lands in Hornechurch Essex. Brother William Naunton Esq. 
House at Charing Cross. To my daughter Bayning all my estate in Car- 
diffe Forest, Carmarthen, sometime the land of Sir John Perre her grand- 
father, and my great gilt cup of the workmanship of Norrenberge which hath 
my coat enamelled. My Lord Viscount Bayning, her husband. To brother 
William my manor of Twiford which descended to me from my dear mother. 
His four sons, Robert, William, Henry and Thomas, and his daughters, 
Elizabeth and Mary, A late account of my cousin Robert Kempton. My 
cousin Samuel Kempton. My cousin Winifred Gosnold, widow, and my 
cousin Mary Gosnold, her daughter. To Mrs. Lucy Downing a gilt bowl 
(with a cover) of the value of ten pounds. Thomas Lord and George 
Verney, my two secretaries. My sister Anne Jeffery, widow. Thomas 
Lower Esq., my wife's son. To my wife and to her chambermaid, each of 
them a black. To Mr. Thomas Lower and Ciprian Southwicke, each of 
them a black. My brother to be executor and my approved, worthy and 
beloved friends Henry Calthropp Esq. and Mr. Emanuell Downing to be 
the supervisors. Cousin Sir Peter Ilayman, knight. Manors of Hoo and 
Kettleborough, Suffolk. Pension and grant for services done his late 
Royal Majesty. Provisional bequest for the founding of a College at Cam- 
bridge. Emanuel Dowi.ing to lie one of the trustees for that purpose. 
Thomas Lord and Lucy Dowi ing among the witnesses to the will and codi- 
cils. Sententia pro valore declared 4 November 1635. Sadler, 121. 

[Note the name of Ciprian Southwicke. — II. F. W. 

The testator. Sir Robert Naunton, Master of the Wards, author of " Frag- 
ments Regalia," it will be seen, appoints Emmanuel Downing a trustee under 
liis will. Lucy Downing is one of the witnesses. In a letter from John Win- 
throp to his wife, (kited January 14, 1C25, he writes : "As we came by Assing- 
ton M r Gnrdon made a motion of choosing the master of the Wards for one 
of the Knights of our shire, w ch my brother Downinge & myself consicleringe 
off, have written to S r Rob' Crane, M rs Bacon & some others about it; he is 
knowne to be sounde for Religion, firme to the Com: W: (for which he suf- 
fered muche) & the mectest man to further the affairs of our Countrye, for our 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1089 

Clothiers businesses &c." (Life and Letters of John Winthrop, vol. i., page 
199). See pages 217-19 of that work for other facts about Sir Robert Naunton. 
— Editor.] 

Peter King the elder of Shaston, Dorset, gentleman, 30 May 1 G58» 
proved 9 December 1658. To be buried in the chancel of St. Peter's 
church in Shaston. To my son Joseph and Grizell his wife all the right 
and title I have in a tenement in the parish of Stower Provest &c. To 
sou Joseph two hundred pounds. To my sister Frances Haine twenty 
pounds. To my sister Grace Lush ten pounds. To my brother Thomas 
King now dwelling in New England ten pounds. To my kinswoman 
Frances Lush fifty pounds. My grandchildren" Joseph King and Mary 
King. My cousin Thomas Lush and his children. My son Peter to be 
sole executor aud Joseph Dade my brother in law and Thomas Dunford 
my kinsman overseers. 

Thomas Durnford one of the witnesses. Wootton, 642. 

John Hollinshed citizen and draper of London 21 November 1616, 
proved 4 December 1616. To Cousin- William, son of my late brother 
William Hollinshed deceased, the messuage or Tavern commonly called the 
si<m of the Grayhound in Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew's Holborn, 
now or late in the tenure or occupation of John Robinson, baker. To my 
cousin Timothv, sou of my late brother William, my messuage &c. called 
the Katherine Wheel, near Holborn conduit in tne parish of St. Sepulchre's 
London. My cousin Dorothy Valentine, daughter of my said cousin Timo- 
thv. To Mary Pountis ah Husbandes, wife of Richard Husbandes, some- 
time my servant and now citizen aud draper of London, my right and inter- 
est in the messuage or Inn called the Bush in Bagshott aud other lands and 
tenements in Finchamsted, in Surrey and in Berkshire &c. To my cousin 
Margaret Pouncer the debt her husband oweth me. My cousin Oliver 
Easton's children. To John Pountis the elder, my son in law, ten pounds, 
in twelve months after my decease. To John Pountis my godson twenty 
pounds when he is a freeman of London. The poor of St. Leonard East- 
cheap. My messuages in Black Raven Alley within Algate. To my 
cousiu William Hollinshed my seal ring &c. ; to his wife my diamond ring 
&c. To his sou Thomas a spout pot &c. To my cousin George Elliott 
and his wife four pounds and to his son in law and his wife four pounds and 
to his son Henry Ellyott four pounds, to be paid them out of that bond that 
the said Henry Elliott oweth me. Others named. My cousin Timothy to 
be executor. The poor of St. Michael Hugan Lane. Proved by Timothy 
Hollinshead. Cope, 126. 

John Pountes citizen and clothworker of London, 29 December 1618, 
proved 18 June 1G24. My stock in Virginia fishing, being about one hun- 
dred and twenty seven pounds to be for my executor Sir Thomas Merry 
and at his disposing my suit of law against Sir Robert Napper aud Nicholas 
Leate, whatsoever is recovered, the one half to be given Hewitt Staper and 
his children towards his maintenance aud the other for my executor, as also 
the like to be done for all things that shall be made of the magazine or 
warehouse at Petrasse with all the rents thereof due to me by Hewitt Sta- 
per, all charges being deducted, the half to be given him &c, the rest for 
my executor, and for the suit of law with one Hildebrand Praisor, the 
charges being deducted, the oue half for my self and the other half for 
Emanuel Dolidra to pay his charges of imprisonment and the other half for 



1090 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

my executor (sic), for the accompt of Brazil * * in Turky (sic) under 
Josua Downing's care the proceed thereof is wholly to come to my execu- 
tor, and for books I will that Patrick Sandes and Mr. John Woddall have 
them between them, as also five pound the piece to make them each a ring. 
Concerning my house and the lease thereof my desire is that Mrs. Stapers 
shall dwell therein during the term of five years and then my executor to 
make the most thereof he can for his and his childrens' use. Also I be- 
queath to my cousin John Pounds five pounds to make him a ring and as 
much for his sister my cousin Husband's wife. I make my loving cousin 
Sir Thomas Merry, knight, my full and whole executor, and thus being in 
haste on my journey for Virginia I make a finall end of this my last will 
and testament. 

This is the last will and testament of me John Pountes to be kept for 
me till my return or certain notice of my death, then to be opened by my 
dear cousin S r Thomas Merry. Byrde, 64. 

[John Pouutis, Vice-Admiral of Virginia, of the King's Council, was a cousin 
of Sir Thomas Merry, died in 1623, on his voyage to England. — W. K. Watkins.] 

Edward Brent 1 February 1624, proved 24 August 1625. Brothers 
Gilles Brent and John Brent to be executors. To brother Gilles my chest, 
wearing apparell therein, my two servants and the half of all such goods 
as shall be found due unto me, my debts being paid. The other half to my 
brother John. To William Sifton fifty pounds of merchantable tobacco. 
All such goods at I have laden on board the Jeames of London, Tobias 
Fellgate Master, or in the Anne of London, Jeames Carter Master, as by 
the Invoice or book shall appear, and all debts due to me in Virginia by 
bill or by my book I do appoint Robert Bennett to receive and make sale 
of and also to recover what debts shall be due to me in Virginia or, after 
his decease or by his appointment, to Maurice Thompson of London, mer- 
chant, whom I do appoint to see this my last will and testament performed. 
And my will is that my said overseers do make return of the proceeds of 
goods and debts &c. unto Richard Bennett of London, merchant, and Jonas 
Hopkins of the same city, merchant, and they to pay my debts in England 
and whatsoever is over to be paid to rny executors Gilles and John Brent. 
My overseers in England to give to Mrs Jane Carter thirty shillings for a 
ring. I do give to Mr. Richard Bennett thirty shillings, to be bestowed in 
a pair of silk stockings, and also to Mrs Judith Bennett, his wife, thirty 
shillings, to be bestowed in a pair of gloves, and to Mr Jonas Hopkins and 
his wife thirty shillings each, to be bestowed in the same manner. To 
Elizabeth Hopkins twenty shillings, to be bestowed in a pair of gloves, if 
she be not married. To Elizabeth Bennett fifteen shillings, to be bestowed 
in gloves, if she be remaining in Mr Richard Bennett's house, and to Jeane 
Bennett, her sister, ten shillings wherever she be, if she be living, and to 
Jeane Pauy (Pavy?) five shillings, if she be a remaining servant to Mr 
Richard Bennett, and to Richard Bennett, servant to Mr. Richard Bennett, 
twenty shillings, if he be living, to be disposed towards an adventure as his 
brother Robert Bennett shall think fit. All these small matters my desire 
is they should be paid within one month after the sight of the will in Eng- 
land. Also it is my will that my overseers have five p c. for u facteringe " 
of my goods. Also I do give unto Robert Bennett thirty shillings, to be 
bestowed in a pair of silk stockings, and to Maurice Thompson two pounds 
of good tobacco for a remembrance. 

Wit: by Samuel Aston and Theophilus Dodsou. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1091 

This will was proved upon the oaths of Maurice Thomson and Theophilus 
Dodson before the Right Wor 11 Sir Francis Wyatt, kn 1 . governor and ('apt. 
general of Virginia, tho twentieth of April 1G25 &c. Teste me John 
Southerns Clerk. Clarke, 82. 

[Richard Brent of Stoke and Addiugton, sheriff of Gloucestershire, 1615, mar. 
Eleanor, dan. of Edw. Reed of Turburie and Witteu. Their children Avere : 
1. Fulke, who emigrated to Maryland and died unmarried; 2. Richard of Eng- 
land; 3. Giles, first of Maryland, of which he was Lieut. General, Governor 
and Admiral, and d. between 1671 and 1673 in Virginia; 4. William, d. in Eng- 
land unmarried; 5. Edward; 6. George; 7. Mary, emigrated to Maryland 1638; 
8. Margaret, emigrated also in 1638 ; D. Catherine; 10. Elizabeth ; 11. Eleanor; 
12. Jane, mar. Thomas Cassie; 13. Anne. 

The above account of the family is taken from the Eichmond Critic of 17 
March, 18S9, and the 5th child (Edward) is doubtless the testator. — W. K. 

"W ATKINS.] 

Anne Hurt (in the Probate Act " Hart") of Dorchester Dorset, widow, 
Monday, 19 February 1654, proved 7 May 1655. To be buried by her 
husband in the church of Chard, Somerset. Three small tenements in 
Chard, being chattel leases. Four godsons, James Cooth, John Cole, John 
Prescott, and William Harvey. Son in law Mr George Cole of Dorchester, 
merchant. Daughters, Dorothy Prescott and Marquesse Ilurvey. The 
daughter of the latter. John Cooth, Mary Cooth and Susanne Deane. 
Her daughter Prescott's five younger children. God daughter Julian 
Gruben. The residue to sou in law George Cole, merchant, with this con- 
dition, that he should distribute and divide the same amongst his children, 
but according to his own mind and pleasure. (Nuncupative) in presence 
of Eleanor Cole, Mary Nicholls and other witnesses. Commission issued 
(as above) to George Cole. Aylett, 120. 

[There was another Registration of the same will in the same volume (Aylett, 
158). Here the name was written Hart, and that of her daughter Marquesse 
was written Harvey.— H. F. W.] 

Anne Cole of Dorchester, Dorset, widow and relict of George Cole late 
of Dorchester, merchant, 7 August 1659, proved 18 July 1660. Eldest 
son John Cole. Eldest daughter Elinor Cole. Daughter Mary Cole. Son 
George Cole. To him his father's seal ring. Son Stephen. Son Jacob. 
Son Symon. Daughter Sarah Cole. Daughter Ann referred to as if not 
then living. Sister Marquis Harvey. Sister Dorothy Prescott. 

Nabbs, 108. 

[The will of George Cole has already appeared in the Gleanings for 1893 {ante 
p. 715 J. My thanks are due to Mr. F. J. Pope for will of John Cole which 
follows. H. F. Waters. 

George Cole of Dorchester, Dorset, Eng., whose will is given iu Register, 
vol. xlvii., page 274 (ante. p. 715), mentions sons Johu, George, Stephen, Jacob 
and Symon ; daughters Eleanor, Anne, Mary and Sarah. He bequeaths to his 
eldest son John all his lands and real estate in New England, unless he renounce 
his right within eighteen months after the testator's decease. 

Above follows the will of Anne, widow of George, and their son John, who 
evidently died unmarried or without issue. 

20 Dec. 1653, Thomas and Mary Bromihton grants to George Cole one-sixth 
of land on the Piscataqua River and on Sturgeon's Creek; one half a sawmill, a 
house and four acres. On the 31 Dec. 1653, they sell him one-sixth the land by 
the mill pond, bought of John Milam, and three-quarters acre bought of Wm. 
Phillips in Boston". At the same time there was granted to Peter Cole of Bar- 
tholomew Lane, London, merchant, one-third interest in the above two lots. 

12 Feb. 1707, Edward Bromfield, attorney for Jacob Cole, rector of the parish 



1092 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

of Swyre and vicar of Toller Fratruni, and Winford Eagle, Dorset, Eng., only 
surviving son and heir of George Cole, late of Dorchester, Dorset, merchant, 
deceased, grants one-sixth part of laud in Centre Haven and ou Mill hill, Boston. 
— Walter K. Watkins.] 

John Cole of Waymouth and Melcomb Regis, Dorset, merchant, 27 
January 1669, proved 14 October 1672. I give and bequeath unto my 
brother Simon Cole and his heirs all that my sixtli part of a plantation in 
Boston in New England and all my messuages, tenements, lands, woods, 
mills and hereditaments &c. in New England. Brother George now none 
for East India. Money due from John Partridge merchant, now resident 
in Barbados. My manor of Blunts Hayes als Blunt-hayes in Dorset. My 
sister Sarah Cole. Brother Jacob Cole to have the books that were my 
uncle Simon Cole's. To Mrs Edith Byat of Waymouth my old gold ring, 
being a "sealed" one, which was my mother's. John Knightsbridge, 
clerk, to preach my funeral sermon. Poor of Dorchester &c. My aunt 
Prescot. My aunt Elianore Whitmore of Culumpton, widow. My sister 
Mary Mervin. My brother Stephen Cole. Eure, 118. 

William Hickman, citizen and cooper of London, 15 September 1672, 
proved 30 September 1672. Messuage in St. Swithin's Lane, held by 
lease from the parish. Wife Margery. Her son Samuel Bittony. My 
sister Mary Sabin. My sister Ursula. Joseph Hickman now residing in 
Virginia. My cousin Richard Hickman. Loving friend Mr. John Flavell. 

Eure, 110. 

Richard Sturman of " Nomr. iv,'' Oo. Westmoreland, 5 March 1668-9, 
proved 30 September 1672. .' > vhole estate in Virginia, Maryland, 
England and elsewhere to be sold, by wife Rebecca, and disposed of either 
for ready money or tobacco between ibis and this time twelvemonth. My 
three children Richard, Valentin^ aucl Margaret Sturman. If wife be with 
child &c. Brother Mr. Thomas liab of Loudon, merchant, and his son 
Thomas Hall of London, merchant. My will and appointment is that my 
wife and children do, the next shipping, transport themselves for England. 
I desire my well beloved friends Col. Nicholas Spencer and Lieut. Col. 
John Washington to be aiding and assisting my loving wife in their advice 
in the disposing of my estate. 

Nicho: Spencer and John Lewlinge witnesses. 

Proved by Rebecca Frodsham als Sturman, the executrix. 

Eure, 113. 

Jonathan Bull of Boston in New England, mariner, 2 August 1727, 
proved 7 January 1728. To be buried at the discretion of friend Mr. 
Samuel Storke of London, merchant. All just debts and funeral charges 
paid and satisfied, the residue and remainder of my estate, both real and 
personal, to be divided into three equal parts, of which wife Elizabeth to 
have one and the other two to be divided amongst my children, Elizabeth 
Bull, John Bull and Samuel Bull, share and share alike, when they shall 
respectively attain their full age of one and twenty years cr day of mar- 
riage. My said wife Elizabeth Bull and my brother Mr Samuel Greenleaf 
to be joint executor and executrix. Witnessed by Mary Hyatt of Ratcliff, 
widow, Mudd Fuller of Ratcliff Broad Street, scr., aud J. Hacket, his 
servant. 

Proved by Elizabeth Bull, the other executor, Samuel Greenleafe pre- 
viously renouncing. Abbott, 2. 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1093 

[Samuel Greenleaf and Martha Bull were married 14 October, 1708.— H. F. W. 

John Bull of Boston, 1658, felt maker, by wife Mary had: John born 1668, 
died young; James b. 1665; Mary b. 1666; Mehitable b. 1669; John b. 1671; 
Henry b. i673; Margaret b. 1676; Martha b. 1678; Samuel b. 1680; Jonathan 
b. 24*Feb. 1683. 

John married Mary Woodward; Mehitable m. Windsor Saudcy ; Mary m. 
John Stiler; Margaret m. John Jones; Martha m. Samuel Greenleaf; Jona- 
than m. Elizabeth Mann and had: Elizabeth b. 30 Sept. 1710, died young; 
Elizabeth b. 23 April 1712, died young; Mary b. 13 July 1714; Elizabeth b. 23 
Feb. 1716; John b. 6 July 1718; Jonathan b. 30 Oct. 1721; Samuel b. 13 May 
1723. 

Will of Jonathan Bull is on file ia Suffolk Probate No. 5587. 

Walter K. Watkins.] 

George Smith of Virginia, 7 October 1728, proved 28 January 1728 
All that mv full part, share and proportion of all the estate or plantations 
in the Island of Virginia in the West Indies and which is lately descended 
to me by the death of my late father Christopher Smith &c. &c, and all 
other my estate, whether real or personal of what kind soever and where- 
soever in Great Britain I give and bequeath unto my aunt Sarah Tayler, 
wife of Richard Tayler of the parish of St. George the Martyr, Middlesex; 
and I make her and her said husband executors. Abbott, 25. 

Paschall Nelson, late of Boston in New England, now residing in the 
parish of St. Margaret's Westminster, Middlesex, Esquire, 19 July 1759, 
proved 19 September 1760. I give, devise and bequeath to my nephew 
John Nelson, of Portsmouth in New Hampshire in New England, merchant, 
all my lands, tenements and hereditaments on or about the river Kennebec 
in the Province of Massachusetts Bay in New England, he conveying there- 
out to the children of my sister Lloyd one seventh part thereof and one 
other seventh part to the children of my sister Hubbard, they first paying 
him their several proportions of the expences which I have been at in the 
settlement and protection of the said lands. And as to my lands in the 
Morehawk (Mohawk?) country in New York I give &c. one thousand 
acres thereof to John Temple, late of Boston in New England (now re- 
siding in London) Esquire, five hundred acres to John Lloyd of Stampford 
in Connecticutt, merchant, five hundred to Nathaniel Elubbard of Stampford 
Esq. and other five hundred to Paschall Smith of Stampford, son of the 
late William Smith of the same place: the papers relating to these last 
mentioned lands are in the hands of the Hon. James DeLeney of New 
York Esq. All the rest, residue and remainder of my estates, both real 
and personal. I bequeath unto my two nephews, the said John Temple and 
John Nelson, whom I appoint executors. Signed Pascall Nelson. 

Proved by John Temple Esq., nephew and one of the executors, power 
reserved of making like grant to John Nelson Esq., nephew and the other 
executor. Lynch, 366. 

[Paschall Nelson graduated at Harvard in 1721, and died unmarried, 19 July, 
175'J, in St. Margaret's Parish, Westminster, England, interred in St. Martin's-in- 
the-Fields. He was a son of John Nelson, born in England 1654 ; died in Bos- 
ton, 15 Nov., 1734, and Elizabeth, daughter of William and Rebecca (Stoughton) 
Tailer. His nephew, John Nelson of Portsmouth, was born in Boston, 12 Dec, 
1730, died 1784 at Granada, W. L, and was a son of Temple and Mary (Went- 
worth) Nelson. His sister Lloyd was Rebecca, born 15 Nov., 1688, the wife of 
Henry Lloyd of Lloyd's Manor, Long Island, N. Y. His sister Elizabeth was 
the wife of Nathaniel Hubbard, of Stamford, Conn. 

John Temple was Sir John Temple, 8th baronet. (See Register, x., 73-7.) 
A son of Capt. Robert Temple of Ten Hill Farms, and Mehitabel Nelson ; he 
married Elizabeth Bowdoin. 

John Lloyd was a son of Henry Lloyd. Walter K. Watkins.] 



1094 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS LN ENGLAND. 

Nicholas Coxf. of Newington Green, Middlesex, gentleman, 17 Julv 
1765, proved 16 November 1765. To my niece Elizabeth Jennys fifteen 
hundred pounds capital stock in Annuities of four pounds per cent per 
annum, transferable at the Bank of England, and to be transferred to her 
within three months after my death; also the interest of eight hundred 
pounds &c. for life; and after her death I give the cap : al of the said 
eight hundred pounds (tbree per cent Annuities) to her b -other, Richard 
Jennys of Boston in New England and Richard Jenneys, his son, and to her 
sister Rebecca Armstrong, wife of Mr. Martin Armstrong of Jamaica, 
equally to be divided amongst them or the survivors of them. One thou- 
sand pounds due me on mortgage of my late nephew Dr. Coxe's house in 
Dover Street &c. Mrs Martha Smith, late Martha Coxe, the widow of 
the late Dr. Coxe. My niece Martha Rogers, wife of Mr. Thomas Rogers. 
My sister in law Mrs Hannah Coxe. Mr John Christopher Smith and 
Martha his wife, late Martha Coxe. To my nephew Mr. Richard Jenneys 
of Boston in New England two hundred pounds, if living at time of my 
death, and if not then to his sou Richard. My nephew Richard Coxe son 
of my brother Coldham Coxe. My nephew Mr Martin Armstrong of 
Jamaica and Rebecca, his wife. My niece Rebecca Coxe, danghter of 
Coldham Coxe deceased. My great nephew William Coxe. Coldham 
Coxe an infant son of my nephew Richard Coxe, and Cecilia Coxe an infant 
daughter of the same. All the children of my late nephew Dr Coxe 
deceased by the said Martha his wife, now Martha Smith, that is to say, 
William, Edward, Peter, George, Martha and Emilia Coxe. 

Rushworth, 405. 

Richard Wharton (eldest son of William Wharton late of Waiteby 
near Wharton in the Co. of Westmoreland in Great Britain, gen*) now 
resident in the City of Williamsburgh in the Colony of Virginia, 26 July 
1712, proved 1 April 1713. I give and bequeath all my estate, both real 
and persona], in this Colony or elsewhere, unto my most dear and well be- 
loved brothers, Thomas and John Wharton, both of London gen tn , in trust 
for my child or children, they not to sell any of my lands &c (except 
slaves) in the Colony without the approbation of Mr. Henry Holdcroft; my 
only son William to have the inheritance in lands and none of my lands to 
be to my daughter. I desire that my dear and loving wife Ruth do not 
fail for her own interest to employ some honest and kuowing attorney to 
demand her dower in any of the lands lying in the Co. of Westmoreland 
which are under any old mortgage to the Lowthers or any other person 
whatsoever, whether my son redeem them or not. My negroes, cattle, 
household goods and lumber, horse flesh and all creatures that I have in 
Virginia here to be forthwith sold by my friend Henry Holdcroft, whom, 
together with Mr Richard Richardson his neighbour, I make executors for 
this Colony and my dear wife for the kingdom of England. To my god 
daughter Mary, daughter of Henry Holdcraft, five pounds sterling. I give 
to the poor widow Skelton (alias Broadbent) with her daughter liberty to 
live in my stone house or Turret so long as they shall remain together and 
to have apples for their own use out of the orchards, and liberty for pas- 
turage for one; cow. And I give her a heifer yearling and a barrel of corn 
yearly to help her towards a maintenance &c. 

Admon. granted (as above) to Thomas and John Wharton the brothers 
for the reason that Ruth Wharton the widow renounced &c. 

Leeds, 93. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1095 

Andrew Faneuil of Boston in the Co. of Suffolk and Province of 
Massachusetts Bay in New England, merchant, 12 September 1734, with a 
Codicil added 23 January 1737, proved 4 September 1738. To the minis- 
ter of the French church in Boston my ware house, to apply two thirds of 
the rents &c. thereof for the maintenance of said minister and lay up the 
other third in bank for the reparation of said warehouse. To the said 
church three peices of plate (flagon, plate and bason) with coat of arms 
and name of donor on each. Other gifts to the poor of said church and to 
the minister. One hundred pounds to the poor of the town of Boston. To 
the Rev d Dr. Benjamin Colman a suit of mourning throughout. My loving 
brother John Faneuil of Rochell. My loving brother in law Peter Cossart 
of Cork in Ireland and his sister Susanna Cossart of Amsterdam. To 
Benjamin Faneuil of Boston, son of my brother Benjamin deceased, five 
shillings and no more. My loving niece Mary, the wife of Mr. Gillam 
Phillips, and Andrew Phillips her son. Anne Faneuil, daughter of my 
late brother Benjamin, and Susanna Faneuil, another of his daughters (to 
be paid in London). Marian Faneuil, another (also to be paid in London). 
Sister Susannah Faneuil, widow of Abraham de la Croix of Rochell. My 
servant maid Hendrine Boyltins and Henry Johnson her son. Peter 
Faneuil, eldest sou of my late brother Benjamin, to be residuary legatee 
and sole executor. 

In the codicil he revokes the bequest to his sister Susanna. Richard 
Blackett Jekyll one of the witnesses. Sworn to in Boston 15 February 
1737. Brodrepp, 212. 

Benjamin Faneuil, late of Boston in New England but now resident 
in Bristol in old England, 2 October 1784 proved 16 May 1787. To wife 
Jane two thousand five hundred pounds and a clear annuity of fifty pounds 
(and plate &c). To the Bristol Infirmary one hundred pounds. To Brook 
VVatson Esq. and Robert Rashleigh of London in old England merchant 
all my messuages lands &c. in trust to sell &c. and pay debts and funeral 
costs and foregoing legacies and place out the residue of the money at 
interest in Government Funds of Great Britain or land security and pay 
the interest or dividends to my brother Peter Faneuil during his life and 
then towards the maintenance and education of his eldest son &c. &c. and 
so on from son to son and daughter to daughter. Failing these then to 
children of my sister Mary Bethune wife of George Bethune Esq. of Boston 
&c. ; and lastly to my next of kin. Major, 211. 

[For accounts of the Faneuil family see " Dealings with the Dead," by Lucius 
Manlius Sargent, vol. 2, pp. 495-549; and Mrs. John A. Weisse's " Bethune and 
Faneuil Families," pp. 45-54. — Ed t tor. 

Andrew 1 and Benjamin 1 Faneuil were Huguenot refugees from La Rochelle, 
France. They tirst settled near New York city, at New Rochelle. Benjamin 
married 28 July, 1G9U, at Kingston, R. I., Ann Bureau; their son Benjamin 2 
born 29 Dec, 1701, died October 1785, and Peter 2 born 1700, died 3 March, 
1742. 

Andrew 1 went to Holland and married there, bringing his wife to this country, 
where she died 16 July, 1724. He died 13 Feb., 1738, disinheriting his nephew 
Benjamin, and making his nephew Peter residuary legatee, and to the latter we 
are indebted for Faneuil Hall. 

The wills here given are of Andrew, 1 and Benjamin 3 son of Benjamin, 2 
grandson of Benjamin 1 and nephew of Peter 2 Faneuil. Benjamin 2 married 
Mary, the daughter of Rsv. Timothy Cutler, of Trinity Church, and died in 
1785 at Brighton, Mass. Benjamin, 3 whose will is given, privately married the 
eldest daughter of Dr. Lloyd, and sister of the Hon. James Lloyd, and quietly 
departed with her to England, where they Avere the centre of a circle of re- 



1096 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

fngees from the colonies. Mary 3 the sister of the testator, married George 
Betlrane. 

The family name of Faneuil has disappeared, there being no descendants of 
the male line through the testator or his brother Peter, 3 who went to Canada. — 
W. K. Watiuns.] 

William Williams of Newport in the Co. of Monmouth gen', 28 
March 1597. I have many poor nephews and nieces, sisters and a very 
unkind brother. My good cousins Valentine Prichard of the Inner Temple, 
London, Esq., Henry Williams of Matharine in the Co. of Monmouth Esq., 
William John Meredith of Abergavenny gen 1 , Thomas Hopkins of the City 
of Bristowe, merchant. My brothers in law John Fownes of the City of 
Bristowe, grocer, and John Jones of Newporte gen'. My lands &c. in 
Rumpney. My sister Catherine and her son William. Lettice, eldest 
daughter to my sister Johane deceased, and Margaret, eldest daughter to 
my brother Richard (unmarried). Cicill and Lettice, two of the daughters 
of my sister Elizabeth. Roger and Thomas, my brother Richard's sons. 
Blanche and Anne, the daughters of my sister Joane. Andrew and 
William, the sons of my sister Elizabeth. Johanne, daughter to my 
brother Richard. Margaret, daughter to my sister Elizabeth. Johane, the 
youngest daughter of my sister Elizabeth. Mary and Hester, daughters to 
my sister Anne. Roger and John, the sons of my sister Johane. Margaret, 
the wife of my brother Richard Williams. The late lands of Roger Wil- 
liams, my cousin deceased. My sister Lettice. My nephew John Evans. 
Roger Williams, my brother Richard's eldest son. Thoruas, his youngest 
son. Margaret, eldest daughter to my brother Richard. My nephew 
William Jones, son of my sister Lettice. My cousin Thomas Scudarnor, of 
Little Salisbury in the County, and my cousin Thomas Scudarnor of York. 
If my nephew Wiliiam Jones, whom I have constituted and made my 
executor, do happen to die before he shall have made probate of this my 
will then my nephew Andrew Jones, my sister Elizabeth's sou, shall be my 
sole executor. I give to my nephew William Jones, my sister Elizabeth's 
sou, the next avoidance, nomination and presentation unto the church of 
Newport and St. Wolloes and to the chapel of Bettus thereunto belonging 
and I do give unto him all my part of the Tythe, corn and hay in Bettus 
for so long time as he shall be Vicar in Newport and St. Wolloes and re- 
main unmarried. To my aunt Mrs. Laugley twenty pounds. John Fownes 
one of the witnesses. 

Commission issued 27 June 1G10 to Roger Williams, next akin &c. the 
executor named iu the will having renouuced. Wiugfield, 66. 



Henry Addams of Bristol merchant, 12 October 1601, proved 10 
November 1601. To my daughter Marie Addames one hundred pounds if 
my adventures by sea, made to France, do come safely home; otherwise 
only fifty pounds (at age of eighteen). The residue to wife Susanna, 
whom I make sole executrix. And I desire my father Thomas Addams 
and my brother in law John Phoens, now one of the sheriffs of the City 
of Bristol, to be my overseers. Iu the presence of my said father, brother 
iu law, my brother Daniel Addams and William Robinson, Vicar of St. 
Nicholas. 

The signature of the brother iu law was Jo: Fownes. 

Woodhall, SO. 



• 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1097 

John Fownes of Bristol, merchant, 28 March, signed 24 August, 1609 
proved 23 October 1G09. If I die in Bristow my body to be buried in the 
parish church of St. Steveus within the city. To wife Anne, for life, all 
my lands and tenements in the Co. of Monmouth, called by the name of 
Monioy, and my house in Newport and the five and twenty acres I bought 
of John Williams of All Souls Oxou ; and after her death the said lands 
and tenements shall remain to my son John Fownes. To said wife my 
dwelling house in Bread Street so long as she shall remain a widow and 
unmarried; then to my son John, if living, and, if not, to my three daugh- 
ters. Son John at one and twenty. Six hundred pounds apiece to daugh- 
ters Mary Fownes, Hester Fownes aud Sara Fownes at eighteen or days 
of marriage. To daughter Hester my virginals, my best carpet of green 
cloth fringed with silk and my silver skynker. Ten pounds apiece to my 
brother James Fownes' two daughters. Ten pounds to my kinswoman 
Mary Longe. My late servant Richard Louge. Provision for two poor 
laboring men yearly to rake and keep clean the marsh of the City of 
Bristow and the walks round about the same. To my brother. Thomas 
Fownes my scarlet gown and tippet. To Richard Longe and John 
Tomlynson thirty shillings apiece in gold to make each of them a siguet 
with my coat armor engraven therein and to wear it in remembrance of 
me, sometime their master. To wife Ann one half of all my plate and 
household stuff in my dwelling house in Bristowe and in my house at 
Catchcolde in the Co. of Gloucester. The other half to my four children 
(equally). Wife Anne to be executrix and my brother in law Mr William 
Williams, my brother Thomas Fownes, Mr Abel Kitchin and Mr John 
Guy to be my overseers. To my good mistress Mrs Langley five pounds, 
to Philip Langley five pounds. To my sister Susan five pounds. To 
Philip Langley's wife and Philip Langley's sisters, viz 1 Mary Tomlynson 
and Anne Vawre, ten pounds, viz 1 to each of them three pounds six shil- 
lings eight pence, to buy them a ring to wear at their pleasure for my sake. 

Mary Langley one of the witnesses. Dorset, 94. 

John Fownes, aged thirty six or thereabouts, 9 June 1624, proved 1 
February 1624. To wife Dorothy Fownes my two closes of land near 
adjoining to Lady well and my three quarter parts of the Dove of Ply- 
mouth, now at New Foundland, with my three quarters of her voyage 
which God shall bless them withal. To my brother Warwick Fownes one 
hundred pounds, to be paid out of my five eighth parts of a ship called the 
Eagle of Plymouth, and her voyage from Virginia or New England if 
please God to send her and her proceeds safely to return. To my mother 
in law Mrs Elizabeth Yarde thirty pounds. To my nephew Francis 
Amadas fifty pounds. To my two nieces Johane and Jane Amadas twenty 
pounds apiece. To my servant Lawrence Beele fifty pounds. To my two 
apprentices John Gay and Thomas Davies five pouuds apiece. To the 
new building behind the church steeple called the new Hospital one hun- 
dred pounds. To the poor of Plymouth ten pounds. To Mr. Mathias 
Nicholls, preacher of God's word at Plymouth, five pounds. Wife to be 
executrix and Mr. Mathias Nicholls Mr Thomas Sherwell my brother in 
law Roger Beele and my brother in law Abraham Rowe to be supervisors. 

Commission issued (as above) to Warwick Fownes, brother of the 
deceased &c, the executrix named in the will having died &c. 

Clarke, 15. 



1098 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Anne Fownes of the City of Bristol, widow, 11 February 1629, proved 
10 November 1630. My body to be buried in the parish church of St. 
Stephens. The six children of my son in law Mr. William Claxton. 
Penelope Claxton one of them. My grandchildren Abell Rogers and 
Mathewe Rogers. My grandchildren Andrewe Barker and Sara Barker. 
My grandchildren Aime Fownes and William Fownes. My grandchild 
John Fownes. My three daughters. William Evans the son of my kins- 
man John Evans. My kinsmau William Jones of Llansemfred in the Co. 
of Monmouth. My sister Catherine Watkins. My cousin Elizabeth 
Steevens. My cousin Mary Longe. My son John Fownes to be sole 
executor and my good friends and kinsmen John Tomlinson and Richard 
Long, merchants, to be overseers. My kinsman Mr. Roger Williams of 
Newporte. Wit: Rich: Long: Willm yeomans. Scroope, 92. 

[The will of Thomas Fownes of Plymouth, Devon., Esq. (1637-1638) which 
should come in here, in chronological order, has already appeared among my 
evidences concerning the Ilolworthy family (see Register for 1891, vol. xlv., 
pp. 153-4; ante, pp. 499, 500). He refers to Mr. John Gayre, gives to the poor 
of Bristol, and names Elizabeth, wife of William Stephens of Bristol, and Mary 
Longe daughter of sister Mary Longe deceased. He calls Judith, wife of Fran- 
cis Amadas, kinswoman and Warwick Fownes of London, merchant, kinsman, 
and refers to Humphrey Fownes as deceased. Richard Longe of Bristol he calls 
kinsman and he also refers to an Aunt Yard as lately deceased. His daughter 
Mary, as we know, was the wife of Richard Holworthy ; another daughter, Pru- 
dence, was the wife of John Waddon and he speaks of daughter Johan as wife 
of Hugh Gayer deceased. He also names daughters Elizabeth Yard and Susan 
Kellond. He names also John, Thomas and Susan Kellond, the children of John 
Kellond. This will therefore binds together the Fownes family of Bristol and 
those of Plymouth and of London. H. F. Waters.] 

Warwick Fownes of London merchant and citizen and mercer of the 
same City, 2 August 1638, proved 17 July 1640. My body I commit to 
the earth from whence it came and to be decently interred as beseemeth 
the body of a Christian in the parish church of St. Bartholomew the less 
near the Royal Exchange in London, whereof I am a parishioner, without 
any pomp or vain ostentation, only my corpse to be accompanied to church 
with my kindred, household, neighbors and familiars, but mourning cloth for 
my executors and household. After debts paid &c. the remainder of my 
goods &c. shall be divided into three equal parts and portious, according to 
the ancient and laudable custom of the City of London, one part wnereof 
I leave to my loving wife Julian for her customary and widow's part, one 
other part I leave to my five children, Humphrey, Elizabeth, Mary, Martha 
and Judith Fownes and such others as God shall send me hereafter. The 
other third part remaining I reserve to myself, therewith to perform this 
my last will and testament. Then follow bequests to wife and children 
and others. My kinswoman Mary Fownes. My cousin Joane Large the 

wife of Large. My friend Charles Yeoman. Mr. Philip Androwe 

the elder. Plymouth, Devon., mentioned. Certain servants named. My 
bi other James Yard and cousin Thomas Fownes to be executors. A brother 
John Yard. Coventry, 103. 

[For assistance on the Kellond family I am indebted to Mr. Winslow Jones 
Who has a large knowledge of Devonshire families. II. F. Waters.] 

Walter Kellonde of Tottones Devon, merchant, 15 May 34 Eliza- 
beth, proved 11 November 1592. My body to be buried in the church of 
Tottones. The poor of the Mawdelin house of Tottones. The poor of 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 10!>9 

South Tawton. To my son Christopher Kellonde the moiety and half of 
all that tenement, houses, edifices, gardens, shops &c. in Totnes which were 
demised to me l>y John and William Wotton, hy their deed bearing date 
4 October 18 Elizabeth. The other moiety I give to my son John Kel- 
land ; each to hold for three score and nine years. [These two sons still 
minors and unmarried.] To Christopher a tenement in Harberton. Other 
bequests to John. To Mary my wife two chambers and gallery in the 
house, with free ingress &c, and other bequests to her of household stuff 
&c. Provision for the schooling of my children which I have by the said 
Mary, they being now infants. To Richard, my eldest son, my messuage 
and tenement in Tottones wherein I now dwell &c. and my messuage &c. 
in Harpers Hill Street, with provision for entailing upon his lawful issue, 
failing which to sou Christopher, next to John, then to my son Walther, 
then to son William, then to son Stephen. To my daughter Decous (or 
Decous) Kellonde threescore pounds at twenty one. To daughter Mary 
Kellonde fifty pounds at twenty one. The same to daughter Margaret Kel- 
londe. To daughter Frideswell Kellonde forty pounds at twenty one. To 
son Walther Kellonde fifty pounds at twenty one. The same to William and 
Stephen. A bequest to a Thomas Kellonde, among others. To Agnes, 
Walther, Thomas, Bartholomew and William Prideaux, children of Thomas 
Prideaux. Henry and Thomas Bickforde sons of John Bickforde. The 
child which my wife now goeth withal, yet unborn. Son Richard to be 
executor and Bartholomew Laskie of Tottones, merchant, overseer- 

Harrington, 83. 

[The testator, "Walter 1 Kelloncl of Totnes, Devon., merchant, whose will 

heads an interesting group, died in 1502. By his first wife, Nichol , had : 

John, 2 Christopher", 2 ^ John, 2 Richard. 8 By his second Avife, Mary, he had: 
Fridswell, 2 William, 2 Stephen, 2 Walter. 2 His will is given and the other Walter 
is probably his son mentioned in his father's will. 

John 2 (1576-1623) married Mary and had : John 3 (1G09-1679), Walter 3 

(died 1611), Samuel. 3 

John 3 married Susanna Fownes (1G17-1G19), daughter of Thomas Fownes of 
Plvmouth, England, and had: John 4 (1635-1092), married Bridget, Thomas, 4 
born 1G36, Samuel, 4 Henry, 4 Samuel, 4 Richard, 4 James. 4 

Christopher, 2 son of Walter, 1 married Joan Brooking; she died 1G21-5, and 
the wills of husband and wife are given. 

Thomas, 4 born 11 Dec. 1036, married Abigail, the widow of Samuel Moore 
and daughter of Capt. Thomas Hawkin, and had: Susanna* b. 21 Oct. 1665; 
John 5 b. 2 June, 1667, died young; John* 1). 13 Feb. 1669, died young; Thomas* 
b. 18 July, 1670, died young; Samuel* b. 11 Sept. 1671 ; Elizabeth* 1). 11 Aug. 1673; 
Thomas* b. 29 Aug. 1674; John* b. 15 June, 1678; Richard* b. 26 Sept. 1681. 

In April, 1661, Thomas Kellond and Thomas Kirk, a relative of Sir David 
Kirk, were commissioned to search for Cols. Edward Whalley and William 
Goffe, two of the regicide judges then in New England. They started in pur- 
suit of them from Boston, 1 May, 1661, and went to the colonies of Connecticut, 
New Haven and New York ; but unsuccessfully. In 1671 Kellond was appointed 
a constable of Boston, but was excused -on paying a forfeit. He died 12 July, 
1G86; his widow then married Hon. John Foster whom she outlived. 

Walter F. Watkins.] 

Christopher Kellond of Totnes, Devon., merchant, 22 September 
1G1G, proved 10 April 1G18. The poor of Totnes. My wife Johane. 
My three sons. The moiety and halfendeale of a house joining to the 
Mill Lane in Totnes, being the inheritance of William Wotton Esq. My 
daughters. My wife to be sole executrix. I do desire ray brother in law 
Mr. Thomas Predeaux, my brother John Kelland and my brother in law 
Christopher Broking to be my overseers. Richard Kellond a witness. 

Meade, 2G. 



1100 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

John Kellond of Tottones merchant, 26 August 21 James, proved 7 
February 1G23. The Maudlen House of Tottones. The poor of Tottones. 
My wife Mary. My son John. My son Samwell Kellond, at twenty one. 
To my daughter Dunes Kellond fifty pounds, but if she take a marriage 
by the consent and agreement of my overseers and executors in trust then 
she shall have five hundred and fifty pounds twelve months after her mar- 
riage, and for her maintenance I give her twenty pounds a year until she 
has her portion. My daughter Mary Kellond. My daughter Katheriue 
Kellond. My daughter Agnes Kellond. My daughter Joan Kellond. 
My five daughters. To son John my house wherein I now dwell, with 
remainder to son Samuel, then to my daughter Dunes Kellond and the heirs 
male of her body. My cousin Henry Bickford of Rottery and each of his 
brothers and sisters. My cousin Agnes Kellond and Nell Kellond her 
sister, daughters to my deceased brother Richard Kellond. The children 
of my deceased brother Christopher Kellond and of my sister Dunes 
Ducke. Nicholas the son of William Squyer. My sister Agnes Prydiaux. 
My sister Jane Bickford. My sister Dunes Ducke. My sister Mary Kel- 
lond. My cousin Mr. Bartholomew Laskey of Tottones. My brother in 
law Mr. Nicholas Wyse. My friend Christopher Broockinge the son of 
the deceased Mr. William Broockinge. My cousin Philip Lea. Son John 
to be sole executor (he not yet twenty one). My brother Steeveu Kellond. 
The mayor and burgesses of Tottones. To " dicayed " merchants. A new 
prisou to be builded. Robert Shaplye one of the witnesses. A nuncupa- 
tive codicil. Gifts in October and November 1G23. William Squyer jun r . 
now in Oxford at the University. My deceased brother Richard Kellond's 
daughter Joan Kellond. My sister Margaret Squyer, after the death of 
her husband. Byrde, 1G. 

Johane Kelland of Totues, Devon., widow, 4 November 1G24, proved 
5 February 1G24. The poor of Tottnes and the poor of the Mawdlyn of 
Tottnes. My son Walter Kelland. My son Christopher Kelland. My 
son John Kelland. My (laughters Johane Kelland, Elizabeth Kelland, 
Jane Kelland, Margaret Kelland and Wethen Kelland. The last named 
to be sole executrix. My brother Christopher Broking and my brother in 
law Christopher Maynard. Clarke, 17. 

Walter Kelland of Stoke-canon, Devon., gen 1 ., 4 October 1G71, 
with a codicil bearing date 11 October 1G71, proved 29 Jnne 1G72. To 
wife Mary Kelland the tenement or living wherein she. now liveth, com- 
monly called Beere, within the parish of Broad-list, Devon. My daughter 
Hannah Kelland. My grandchild Audrey Kelland, daughter of my de- 
ceased son Richard Kelland. My four grandchildren the daughters of my 
said deceased son Richard Kelland, over and above the portions that their 
said father appointed and bequeathed unto them, viz 1 , to Elizabeth, Mary, 
Audrey and Dorothy. My estate of inheritance which I lately bought of 
Jonathan Wade of Topisham gen*., situate, lying or being in Sowton, Devon, 
I give to my daughter Elizabeth Lee, the now wife of Edward Lee, for 
term of her natural life, then to their second son Walter Lee, next to their 
third son Edward Lee, then to John Lee, their fourth son, then to Richard 
Lee, their eldest son, then to their daughter or daughters. My grandson 
Walter Kelland, eldest son of my deceased son Richard. My grandson 
Richard Kelland, brother to the said Walter. My daughter Dorothy 
Vicary, widow, her daughter Mary Vicary and her sou Walter Vicary. 
My grandson Walter Kelland, son of my son Walter, and his two sisters 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1101 

Mary and Hannah. Mrs. Anne Robinson, widow. The Ward-house, 
wherein I now keep the Sheriff's ward or prison for the County of Devon, 
situate in the parish of Stoke-Cauon. My son Walter Kellaud and my sou 
in law Edward Lee. Eure, 76. 

John Kellond of Paingsford, Devon, Esq., 22 September 1677, proved 
16 July 1679. To Richard Bickford of Brent in Devon, yeoman, five 
pounds. Elizabeth Predham of Little Hempston, Devon, widow. Jane 
Barrie of Bridgetown in the parish of Berry Pomeroy, Devon, widow. 

The poor of Aishprington and those of other parishes that shall be at 
my funeral. The poor of Totues, Devon. My servant Nicholas Eraucis. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my son Thomas Kellond of Boston in 
New England, my second son, for his portion, two thousand pounds. To 
my daughter Joane Kellond one hundred pounds and no more because she 
hath departed from my house and married against my liking and consent. 
My grandson Francis Fullford, my godson, at one and twenty. My cousin 
Zachary Gould of Staverton. My grandson John Kellond, the son of my 
son John Kellond of Totnes. My farm and barton called Durleigh lying 
near Bridgewater, Somerset. My grandson Charles Kellond, the son of my 
son John Kellond of Totnes. My mansion house, barton, farm &c. called 
Tingrasse in the parish of Tingrasse, Devon. Other real estate. Son 
John. His daughter Susan Kellond, my grandchild, at day of marriage, 
and her sister Bridget Kellond. To every one of my son Thomas Kellond's 
children one hundred pounds, at day of marriage. My grandchild Eliza- 
beth Sparke in Barbathos. King, 174. 

John Kellond of Painsford, Devon, Esq., 10 March 1690, proved 1 
November 1692. Reference to a deed bearing date 1 6 October 36 th Charles 
II, made between me, of the one part, and Francis Fulford Esq., Charles 
Kellond my son and Valentine Pomeroy gen 1 and John Rowe gen', of the 
other part, for the conveyiug and settling my manor and lordship of Slapton 
and the capital messuage &c. of Stancombe. My wife Bridget. My three 
daughters Susanna, Bridget and Katherine Kellond. My grand daughter 
Margaret Kellond, daughter of my son Charles. My brother in law 
Thomas Drewe Esq. and his now wife. My nephew Samuel Kellond, at 
the expiration of his apprenticeship. Certain servants. My kinsman 
George Yard of the City of Exon (Exeter) mercer. In a codicil he refers 
to kkisman M r George Yard of Stokegabriel. Fane, 206. 



Luce Shorte, widow, of Gillingham, 4 October 1603, proved 2 Decem- 
ber 1G03. To be buried in the churchyard of Gillingham. Brother Henry 
Shorte My sister Alice Murgin. Alice Goodiuge, Thomas Goodinge, 
Simon Gooding, Elizabeth Goodinge and Murgin Dauye which are my 
sisters children. James Arnolde and Richard Arnold at twenty one. My 
daughter Elizabeth Shorte. My son Thomas Shorte. My house in 
Maidestone to my son Thomas, and if he die without lawful heirs of body 
then to Thomas Goodinge and Simon Gooding, to be equally divided be- 
tween them &c. Margaret Berry, Dorothy Kente, Joane Edwardes and 
Elizabeth Shorte my daughters. Marrian Astreates, Joane Astreates and 
Sara Astreates. Elizabeth, Richard and John Berry. Dorothy Rente's 
child. Joaue Edwarde's child. Richard Kente of Stoke shall be guardian to 
my son Thomas Shorte till he comes to the age of fourteen. The residue to 
my son William Shorte whom I make sole executor. For overseers I ap- 
point Richard Astreetes of Gillingham and Richard Kente of Stoke. Henry 
Short and James Thurston witnesses. Bolein, 105. 



1102 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

William Short of Gillingham, Kent, 16 November 1G41, proved 21 
December 1641. To be buried in Gillingham near the tomb of the Shorts, 
my ancestors. My two grandchildren William Short and Elizabeth Man- 
ser. My sister Johau Edwards and Mary Lofty her daughter. Richard 
Arnold, William Berrye and Thomas Berrye, my sisters sons. Susan 
Grauesden and John Wilson, my sisters daughters. Symon Gooddin my 
kinsman. Mr. John Short, Mr. James Short, Henry Lawrance, Richard 
Lawrauce, William Lawrance, Thomas Lawrance, Sarah Baylie, Mary 
Duck, widow, Elizabeth Smith, Mark Short and John Short, his brother. 
Susan Gravesend again mentioned. My kinsman Richard Arnold to be 
sole executor. My grandchild William Short, son of my son James. 
Richard Baylye and Thomas Lofty. The capital messuage or tenement, 
called the Brewhouse, in Week Street in Maidstone. Reference to will of 
John Short deceased. John and Joseph, his sons. John Short the son of 
Thomas Short. Job an Duke, the daughter of the aforenamed Mary Duke, 
widow. The foresaid Joane Wilson. William Mauser, my son in law. 
Elizabeth Manser, his daughter. P^velvn, 128. 

[The testator of the above will is that William Short referred to in the will 
of his nephew Richard Arnold, printed in the Gleanings for July, 1894 (pp. 374- 
375; ante, pp. 8S2-3J. H. F. W.] 

John Lorde of RedrifF. Surrey, clothier, 14 September 1603, proved 8 
December 1603. To wife Elizabeth, for life, my two houses in Sudbury, 
Suffolk, one of them, with an orchard, being in the parish commonly called 
Gregory parish, and the other in the parish commonly called Peter's parish. 
After the decease of my wife I give them to my daughter Elizabeth. If 
my wife die before my daughter shall have accomplished the full age of 
nineteen years then the two houses aforesaid and the benefit of their rent 

shall freely remain in the possession of Anthony Lord my father and 

my mother, or the survivor of them, until my daughter come to said age of 
nineteen years. But if she die without issue then the said houses shall go 
to the said Anthony Lord my father and my mother and the sur- 
vivor of them, and afterwards to my three sisters yet unmarried, Alice, 
Joue and Prewe Lord (each one third) provided they pay to their other two 

sisters ten pounds i. e. to Elizabeth five pounds and to Anne 

five pounds. To my father Anthony Lorde ten pounds. To 

Robert Lorde my In-other forty shillings which he shall recover by a bond 
due to me from William Johnson of Colchester, Essex. My wife Eliza- 
beth to be executrix. Bolein, 1 10. 

John Lord of Sudbury, Suffolk, 1 March 1640, proved 11 July 1655. 
To the poor of all the three parishes in Sudbury forty shillings apiece. 
To Mr Rogers minister of the parish wherein I now dwell, if he be living 
and preach a sermon at my funeral, forty shillings, or otherwise unto such 
godly minister as shall preach such sermon. I give to Bennett my loving 
wife all that my messuage or tenement, with the yards, gardens, orchards 
and appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate and being in the parish of 
St. Gregory in Sudbury which I late purchased of Robert Lord my kins- 
man and Katherine his mother, or one of them, and now is in the tenure or 
occupation of William Gunton the elder &c. My wife to hold this for 
life, and after her decease I give and bequeath the said messuage &c. as 
also the messuage &c. in the parish of All Hallows in Sudbury wherein I 
now dwell and which my said wife holdeth for life, unto my daughter Elizabeth 
wife of William Stacie the vounger of Boeking, Essex, for life. And after 



.- 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1103 

decease of said wife and daughter I give to Anne Stacy ray grandchild the 
messuase in the occupation of William Gunton and to Elizabeth Staeie my 
grandchild the other messuage. If they die without issue &c. then to my 
grandchild Mary Stacy. Other gifts to grandchildren and to wife. To the 
children of Thomas Gunton the elder by my sister, viz*: to my cousin Thomas 
Gunton the younger and to William, his brother, twenty pounds each, for 
the benefit of their children, and to Anne and Elizabeth Gunton, sisters of 
the said Thomas the younger and William, ten pounds apiece. 

Item, I give unto my cousin Robert Lord, if he comes again from beyond 
the seas to demand it, ten pounds. 

William Stacie, the husband of my daughter Elizabeth, to be sole 
executor and my kinsman Thomas Gunton the younger to be supervisor. 
I will that my executor shall pay unto Susan Lord, my sister of the half 
blood, four pounds yearly during her life, to Oliver Dowdle (my servant 

that was) forty shillings, to my kinsman sou of Barwicke and Anne 

Lord my kinswoman, apprentice with one Bowser, a weaver of Sudbury, 
twenty nobles. Aylett, 70. 

Bennett Lord of Sudbury, Suffolk, widow and aged, 26 September 
1653, proved 26 July 1655. My sou in law William Stacye of Booking, 
Essex, and his children. Frances Gunton daughter of my cousin William 
Gunton. Oliver Dowdall and Martha Ilugens my servants. My kinsman 
Richard Cooke of London for the use of his children. My kinsman 
William Wood of London in the behalf of his children. My sister Eliza- 
beth Crewes of Tendring. Mihill Clarke of Much Bromly, Essex, to be 
my Executor. Aylett, 76. 

[We have now the English home of one of our distinguished Essex County 
families. Mr. Robert Lord was for years clerk of the courts for Ipswich, Mass. 
His son Robert tilled the office of Marshal of the court for Ipswich, au office, 
the nearest equivalent of which now is that of High Sheriff. Mrs. Katherine 
Lord, widow, mother of the first Robert, received a grant of land in Ipswich 
(Mass) in 16-11, within a few months, probably, after conveying to John Lord of 
Sudbury (England) her iuterest in the messuage, etc., in the parish of St. 
Gregory, referred to in the said John Lord's will. 

I found at Finchingfleld, when I went down to Essex in 1891, this entry ou 
the register : 

" 1630, Nov. 11, Robert Lord and Mary Waite." 

I do not find among my extracts any note of baptisms of any children of this 
couple. Mr. Lord probably took his wife back with him to Sudbury. Fiuch- 
ington Registers apparently began in 1617. — Hexry F. Waters. 

Mary Waite, wdio married Robert Lord, was a daughter of Samuel and Mary 
(Ward) Waite of Wethersfield in Essex. The will of her brother, Rev. Joseph 
Waite, M.A., Rector of Springton in Suffolk, is printed in vol. xlvi., p. 318 
(ante, p. 588). Other wills of Waites and Wards will be found in that volume, 
pagjs 313-320 (ante, pp. 583-590).— Editor.] 

George Ma.rvix (parish not stated) 24 March 1643, proved 4 April 
1649. I do acknowledge myself in debts — to Mr Colney four pounds five 
shillings, at the darke house a matter of eight shillings, Mr Ilaman, a 
seedsman, two or three shillings, one Edward three shillings, to the apothe- 
cary. I do will and bequeath fifteen pounds to my sister in Mislye, ten 
pounds to my uncle at Stutton, five pounds to my cousin William at Stutton, 
five pounds to my cousin John of Hentley, five pounds to my cousin John 
of Stepney, five pounds to my cousin Richard of Rushmore, ten pounds 
to Mrs Ward, widow of Mr Samuel Ward, five pounds to Mr Nath : 
Ward late of Walke-horne, three pounds to Mr Colney at whose house I 



1104 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

now am, two pounds to Barnabas Brag at Mr Colney's house, ten pounds 
in Mr Nathaniel Ward's hands for the good of the child, to be paid 
when he shall think best for its good, ten pounds Doctor Hubbard for his 
pains and care, to John and Tobias Coachman ten shillings apiece, two 
pounds to Mrs Thorneton, to the poor of Silver Street where I shall be 
buried ten shillings, to the poor in Cobden twenty shillings, to the poor of 

Bently ten shillings. The poor of My cousin Knolls in Five 

foot Lane. My cousin Bales; she lives at Coldharbor. Mr Thompson to 
preach my funeral sermon. I do appoint and name for my executors Mas- 
ter Nathaniel Ward and Mr Joseph Ward. Due me in moneys upon a bill 
a hundred and fifteen pounds in Mr Nathaniel Ward's hands. My books 
in a square chest with a padlock, with linen &c, at Mr Colveye's. My bill 
is in my desk. My friends Nathaniel and Joseph Ward, ministers, desiring 
them to see my body to be decently interred. 

Proved by Nathaniel Ward, power reserved for Joseph Ward. 

Fairfax, 46. 

[In the Probate Act Book he is described as late of the parish of St. Olave 
in Silver Street, London.] 

John Ward of Stratford, Suffolk, clothier, 19 October 1629, proved 18 
May 1631. 1 give and bequeath to Anne my beloved wife all that my 
freehold tenement called Dawes, together with fifteen acres of land, more 
or less, with the appurtenances, situate and lying in East Mersey, for term 
of her natural life; and after her decease to John Ward my son and to his 
heirs forever. I give to Anne, my wife, towards the proving and perform- 
ing of this my last will, my fourth part of the ship called the Unity of 
Maningtree, with all my part of the furniture and tackling thereof, with all 
my stock, venture and profits therein, and also all my part in another ship 
now begun to build in Ipswich, and all my cloth, wool and yarn, together 
with all my debts owing and growing due to me by any person or persons 
at London or elsewhere, and also all my cattle, household stuff, money, 
goods, and chattels whatsoever. I give more to Anne my wife all my plate 
for term of her natural life. I give to John Ward my eldest son one hun- 
dred and forty pounds of lawful money of England, to be paid by Anne my 
wife (whom I make sole executrix of this my last will) when he shall 
accomplish the age of three and twenty years. I give to Samewell Ward 
my son one hundred pounds, at age of four and twenty years. I will that 
Anne my wife shall bestow upon some of my former wives children (where 
she sees most need) three pounds &c. To the poor of Stratford twenty 
shillings. I make Mr. Samewell Linsell, minister of Stratford, my well 
beloved friend, supervisor &c. 

The witnesses were Lyonell Chewte, Nathaniel Backler. 

St. John, 67. 

[Thc-c two -wills should interest some of our New Englanders. That of 
George Marvin (which, by the way, had been entered on the margin of the 
leaf as will of Roger Marvin) evidently refers to the family of Samuel Ward, 
the famous town preacher of Ipswich, England. John Ward of Stratford, 
whose will follows Marvin's, must have been the father of our John Ward, the 
chirurgeon, of Ipswich, Mass. The will of his widow, Anne Ward, I have 
already given (see Reg. for 1892, pp. 317-8; ante', pp. 587-8). To what family 
can these have belonged? Our John Ward, the chirurgeon, spoke of a cousin 
Nathaniel, son of an uncle Nathaniel Ward, and referred also to a cousin Ward's, 
of Wethersfield, two youngest sons. II. F. Waters.] 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1105 

Nicholas Carew of St. Martin's in the Fields, Middlesex, gentleman, 
23 November 1G57, proved 12 October 1670. I have had and received 
divers sums of money and sundry necessaries of and from my natural bro- 
ther Swithen Carew of St. Giles iu the Fields, Middlesex, grocer. I give 
to said Swithen all my goods &c. in or upon my now plantation in the 
island of Maryland, together with my whole interest and estate in the same 
plantation ; and 1 make him sole executor. 

Proved (at above date) by S within Carew. Peuu, 132. 

Joseph Adams of the Island of Antigua merchant but now residing in 
London. 1 April 1717, proved 13 October 1722. I give and bequeath all 
my estate, both real and personal &c., unto my brother in law Hopefor 
Bendall of Antegoa, merchant, and John Neale of London, dyer, in trust 
&c. To my beloved mother Elizabeth Adams thirty pounds a year, and 
twenty pounds also in one month after my decease. To the said Hopefor 
Bendall twenty pounds. To Daniel Davies of London, packer, twenty 
pounds in case he marries my sister Mary Adams. To the said John Neale 
twenty pounds. To my nephew Joseph Bendall/ son of the said Hopefor 
Bendall, six hundred pounds in six months after the decease of my said 
mother. And after the payment of the said sum I give one hundred pounds 
unto my partner Edward Chester junior. The residue to and amongst the 
child or children of my loving sisters Elizabeth Bendall and the said Mary 
Adams, share and share alike, excluding thereout the said Joseph Bendall 
on account of the said legacy. The said Hopefor Bendall and John Neale 
to be executors. Marlboro, 188. 

Hopefor Bendall of the Island of Antigua Esq. day of June 

1727. My late brother in law Joseph Adams, formerly of this Island of 
Antigua but late of London, merchant deceased, in and by his last will and 
testament bearing date 1 April 1717, did (among other legacies and bequests 
therein) give, devise and bequeath unto his nephew Joseph Bendall (sou of 
me the said Hopefor Bendall) the sum of six hundred pounds, to be paid 
to him within six months next and immediately following the death or 
decease of Elizabeth Adams, mother of the said testator, and, after payment 
of that and all other legacies in the said recited will mentioned, did give, 
devise and bequeath all the rest and residue of his real and personal estate 
whatsoever unto and amongst the child or children of his sisters Elizabeth 
Bendall (late wife of me the said Hopefor Bendall) and Mary Adams late 
the wife of Daniel Davies of London, packer, share and share alike, exclud- 
ing thereout the said Joseph Bendall on account of the said legacy &c, and 
thereof appointed me, the said Hopefor Bendall, and John Neale of Lon- 
don, dyer, sole executors, as in and by the said will, duly proved at London 
13 October 1722 and remaining in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury 
&c. I give all my estate to the said John Neale of London my brother in 
law, Jonathan Perrie, late of London merchant but at present residing in 
the West Indies, Thomas Kerby and Francis Delap, both of this Island of 
Antigua, merchants &c, in trust (for the benefit of my children, so that they 
may all share alike) and I make them my executors. 

Then follow certain depositions made in Antigua 1 November 1728, by 
which it appears that the above testator had been Collector of the Customs 
in Antigua, and that his death happened on Sunday the twenty-seaventh 
day of October last. Will allowed (in Antigua) 1 November 1728 and 
recorded in the Register's office. Proved in London (P. C. C) 7 October 
1729. Abbott, 263. 



1106 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

[Edward Bendall of Boston, an enterprising merchant, the father of Hope- 
for, the testator, probably came with Winthrop in 1G30. His energy was strik- 
ingly shown in raising a vessel, the " Mary Rose," in 161:2, which had been sunk 
in Boston harbor by a gunpowder explosion. He married, probably in England, 
Ann, and had Freegrace baptized July 5, 1G35, who died ; and he then hadFree- 
grace, born Sept. 30, 163G, the mother dying Dec. 25, 1G37. He then marries in 

about one year, Marah , and had Reform in 1G30, Hopefor Oct. 7, 1641, 

Moremercy 1643. His wife Mary [sic] was buried May, 1G44, and he then mar- 
ried Jane and had, in 1G48, Ephraim. and, in 1049, Restore. 

Mr. Savage gives the death of Edward Bendall as in 1G82, probably misled by 
the fact of an administration being granted in that year on his estate, doubt- 
less necessary in the settlement of the estate of his son Freegrace, and conse- 
quent on the action of the town of Boston, March 13, 1681-2T By deed, Jan. 
26, 1GG0-1, Lib. iv., p. 88, of Suffolk Deeds, Jane Bendall, wife of Edward Ben- 
dall, deceased, authorizes Capt. Samuel Scarlett as her lawful attorney. In 
Suffolk Deeds, Lib. i., pp. 316, 317, under date of 1G53, is given an execution on 
the estate of Edward Bendall. 

Jane Bendall may be the " Jane Scarlett, now the wife of John Jacob," men- 
tioned in the will of Samuel Scarlett in 1675; perhaps the daughter or sister of 
Samuel Scarlet, as the latter dying without children leaves property to Hopefor 
and Ephraim, and Freegrace. Mary, wife of Samuel Scarlett, may have been 
sister of Edw. Bendall. Freegrace Bendall married Mary, daughter of Francis 
and Alice Lyall, and had Bridget, Elizabeth, Ann, Alice, Richard. Pitford, More- 
mercy, Freegrace, Scarlett, and Marianna who married Dr. Daniel Allen of 
Boston. Freegrace and wife were drowned in the harbor coming from Nod- 
dle's Island, with two others, June 6, 1676. John Scarlet was appointed oue 
of the administrators of his estate. 

Hopefor Bendall, mariner, was of London March 14, 170S-9, at which time 
he disposed of certain lands at Merrimac, left him by Samuel Scarlet in 1G75 
(Suffolk Deeds, Lib. xxiv., p. 240). 

He had also appeared at Boston as early as 1666, as commander of a vessel 
sailing between New England, New York and Old England. — Waltkr K. Wat- 
kins.] 

John Pekuy late of Antigua but now of St. James Westminster, Mid- 
dlesex, merchant, 24 June 1708, proved 4 April 1713. The parish of 
Youghall wherein I was born, in the Co. of Cork and Kingdom of Ireland. 
The parish of Christ Church in the City of Cork. The parish of St. John's 
in the Island of Antigua, one of the Leeward Islands. My sister in law 
Mary Perry, widow and relict of my deceased brother Samuel. My dear 
and well beloved sister Anne Osborne, widow, and her two daughters Mary 
Mills and Joyce Osbourne. Every of the grandchildren of my said sister 
Osborne (except Jo. Freeman the son of James Freeman to whom I have 
already given &c. ). My nephew Samuel Perry at twenty one. My wife 
Anne. My daughter Anne Perry. A debt clue to me from Major Long 
of said Antigua. Daughter Dorothy Perry. Debt due to me from Patrick 
Browne late of Antigua. Daughter Elizabeth Perry. My half of the 
plantation in St. Mary's, Antigua, lately rented to Patrick Browne deceased. 

To my daughter Mary all my right, title and interest of. in and to my 
plantation in the Province of South Carolina. My nephew Jonathan 
Perry, son of my brother Edward, at twenty one. My brother Edward 
Perry, my friend Archibald Hutchinson Esq. and my wife to be guardians 
of my children. My daughters Anne and Dorothy Perrey and my brother 
Edward to be joint executors. 

Commission issued (at above date) to Jonathan Perry, lawful guardian 
of Anne and Dorothy Perry, to administer during their minority or until 
Edward Perry, the other executor, shall have accepted. 

Proved 7 October 1713 by Edward Perry, power reserved for Anne and 
Dorothy. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1107 

Commission issued 23 May 1717 to Jonathan Perrie, guardian of Anno 
and Dorothy Perrie, to administer dining their minority, Edward Perry 
the other executor having deceased. 

Proved 5 August 1722 by Anne Rigby als Perrie (wife of Richard 
Rigby), power reserved for Dorothy. Leeds, 88. 

Edward Perrie of Antigua 24 Eebruary 1714, with a codicil dated 
24 January 171 » proved 23 May 1717. My eldest daughter Mary Pullen 
of London Widow. My only son Jonathan Perrie of London merchant. 
My well beloved friends Mr. Mopefor Bendall, Mr. Edward Chester jr. and 
Mr. Joseph Adams of Antigua merchants. 

Tn the Codicil certain specific legacies. To son Jonathan all my plate 
with m} 7 coat of arms. To my sister Nisbitt my common prayer book and 
the seal that's hanging to my watch which did belong to my brother John 
Perrie. To Mr. Hopefor Bendall my sword, belt and gun. To Mr. Ben- 
dall's daughter (my godchild) the silver tankard I expect out of England. 
Other legacies. Whitfield, 101. 

John Barton of Huntingdon in the County of Huntingdon, burgess 
and alderman of the same borough, 4 March 1G42, proved 23 October 1G47. 
My will and desire is that Mr. Pike the minister of All Saints in Hunting- 
don should preach at my burial for the edifying of the people; and I give 
him for his pains therein to be taken forty shillings. My lease of certain 
pasture grounds iu Buckworth (Huntingdonshire) holden of the Duke of 
Richmond and Lenox and had by assignment from Robert Wapole of 
Woodwalton in said County I do give (the remainder of the term) unto the 
said Robert Wapole, and also my stock of cattle upon said pasture grounds, 
upon trust &c. S ; xty pounds to be given to my sister Stumbles and her 
children, fifty pounds to my sister Allen's children, ten pounds to my ser- 
vant Robert Berry. I give my messuage &c. in Huntingdon wherein I now 
dwell to my wife Elizabeth, for and during the term of her natural life, 
and after her decease to John Barton my uncle Thomas Barton's son and 
the heirs of his body &c, with remainder to all the children of my sisters 
Jane Stombles and Anne Allen. I give to my nephew John Gymber that 
part of my messuage or cottage in Godmanchester now in the occupation 
of Robert Litstar. The rest of said messuage, now in the occupation of 
John Tubbs I give to my sister Anne Allen. But my wife Elizabeth is to 
have the said messuage or cottage during her life. I give her also my four 
acres of meadow in Westmeadow in Godmanchester, for life and after her 
decease I give said meadow to my aforesaid kinsman John Barton. To 
my sister Lettice Kyte five pounds. To my aunt Vintner of Godmanches- 
ter forty shillings towards the buying of her a bullock. To the poor of 
Huntingdon forty shillings and thirty nine shillings more which is owing to 
me from the town. All the residue &c. to my wife Elizabeth and my 
aforesaid kinsman John Barton to be equally enjoyed and occupied between 
them in a joint partnership of trading together, which my desire is may 
continue between t!:em during their joint lives. If not then an equal divi- 
sion to be made between them &c. They to be executors and Gervace 
Fullwood of Huntingdon, gen*., and Thomas Pont of the same town, gen*., 
to be overseers. 

Wit: Richard Pike, clerk, Thomas Pont, Francis Bludwicke. Proved 
by John Barton. Lines, 11)9. 



1108 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Elizabeth Barton of Hunt, widow, 10 July 164G, proved 23 October 
1G47. To my sister Lettice Kite twenty pounds and the bed on which I 
lie and the things which pertain thereto. To all the children of my brother 
Thomas Kite of Chattels, by name Fortunatus Kite, Benjamin Kite, 
Rebecca Shepard, Elizabeth Blote, Mary Kite and Frances Neale, five 
pounds apiece. To Elizabeth Haines five pounds. To the poor of Hunt- 
ingdon thirty shillings. To my servant Josiah Lambert one pair of sheets. 
To my servant Annis Web my old gown. All the rest of my worldly 
goods I give to John Barton whom I make sole executor. 

Fiues, 201. 

[In the office of the Clerk of the Courts for Essex County, at Salem, Mass., 
are two volumes (I. and II.) of Notarial Records. In vol. i., fol. 5G, begins a 
series of depositions and affidavits about the late John Barton of Salem, ances- 
tor of many well known and important Salem people. The chief evidence is 
that of Lydia Barton, who calls herself relict widow of Doctor John Barton, 
formerly of Huntington, in the kingdom of England, more lately of Salem, 
aforesaid, deceased. She deposes that her late husband came to New England 
in 1G72, that he was married to the deponent 7 June, 1G75, that he was an apoth- 
ecary by occupation at first and afterwards practised physic and chyrurgery, 
that he departed this life in the Island of Barbados in December, 1G94, as she 
was certainly advised, and that she had often heard him say in his lifetime that 
he was the son of Mr. John Barton of Huntington, before mentioned, fell- 
monger, and that he had several brothers, the names of three of whom, the 
deponent well remembered, were Robert, Thomas and Furley, but that depo- 
nent's husband, John Barton, was the eldest brother. She further deposed that 
she had lawful issue by the said John Barton, five sons and one daughter, that 
the two eldest, both whose names were John, after their father and grand- 
father's names, died both iu infancy, so that there were surviving, Thomas, 
Zacheus, Samuel and Elizabeth, of whom Thomas, the eldest surviving son of 
the said Dr. John Barton, deceased, was, at the time of the affidavit, bound on 
a voyage to Barbados and England. 

The above affidavit was taken on the twenty-sixth or twenty-eighth day of 
February, 1705 (6). Let me add that Mrs. Barton had been Lydia Roberts and 
step-daughter of Mr. Moses Maverick of Marblehead. — Henry F. Waters.] 

Thomas Coles, citizen and clothworker of London, 23 August 1672, 
proved 7 September 1G72. To be buried in the middle aisle of the parish 
church of St. Mary Islington, where I am now inhabitant. Wife Jane 
Coles. Her daughter Anne Delaune. Wife's sister Mary Chipchase. 
The five children of cousin Mr. Paul Pryaulx, William, Peter, Mary, Amee 
and Jane. Cousin Elizabeth Ellis living iu the parish of Stepney, near 
Ratcliffe Cross, and cousin Anne Adams, her sister, living in or near Plum- 
sted in Kent. Friend Thomas Reynolds of Byfield iu the County of 
Northampton and my cousin Edeth Reynolds, widow, his mother, and Edith 
and Anne Reynolds, two of her daughters. Cousin Elizabeth Bellio, now 
servant with Mr. Skinner, merchant in Augustine Friers in Loudon. 
Judith Chipchase, daughter of the aforenamed Mary Chipchase. The 
Parish of Morton Pinckney (Northampton) where I was born. 

Eure, 109. 

[The will of Paul Mercer (see Reg. for 1893, pp. 511-3; ante, pp. 784-6) 
shows that Mary Chipchase was a daughter of Mercer's sister, Mrs. Judith 
Johnson. Jane, another daughter, was referred to in Mercer's will as then 
(1GG1) the relict of the late Gideon de Lawne". She must afterwards have 
become the wife of Thomas Coles, as above. The will of Mrs. Mary Coqnell 
alias Le Mercier, widow of Martin Vander Bist, of which a large summary is 
given in the Register for January, 1895 (pp. 137-140; ante, pp. 985-8), should 
be studied in connection with all the other Mercer and Pryaulx wills. She was 
a sister of Paul Mercer, Judith Johnson, Hester Bachiler and others there 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1109 

nftmod. In my note on page HO (of Reg. for Jan. 1805 ; ante, p. 088) I suggest 
that those Mercers, or perhaps more properly Le Mcrciers, may have migrated 
from France or the Channel Islands. I ought to have added that they may also 
have been of Flemish origin. There was evidently a large migration (of Pro- 
testants) from Flanders to England. The Registers of, Wills show this. I 
believe the Houblon family (connected with the Mercers) was Flemish. — H. 
F. Waters.] 

James Clarke of East Farleigh, Kent, gen 1 , 13 July 1G14, proved 1 
November 1614. Daughter Grace Clarke. I give to Abraham Preble, 
my servant, five pounds aud to Anne Joye, my maid, forty shillings, to be 
paid to every of them within two years after my decease. [ give to every 
of my servants which serve me without wages five shillings apiece. And 
to every one that serveth me for wages two shillings and six pence apiece, 
in token of remembrance. Payment made to Margery Baker. And she 
to have a dwelling in my house as before. The reparations of the church. 
The poor of the parish. Mr. Basden minister. Son Edward. Wife Mary. 
My two sisters (not named). I give unto Griffin Roches and Jane his 
wife my house and orchard lying at Court wood gate iu the parish of Ilyn- 
ton, to have and to hold to them during the life of the said Jane. And 
after her death I give them to Weston Clarke and to his heirs for ever. I 
give uuto Dolor Davis my servant my house and land lying in the parish 
of Marden, the which is in the occupation of one Terrye. And after the 
death of my wife Mary Clarke I give unto Weston Clarke all my lauds, 
tenements and hereditaments lying in the parish of Ilynton (he paying to 
his brethren to every one of them an hundred pouuds according to my last 
will, for otherwise I know not how they shall be paid). Lawe, 118. 

Abraham Preble of East Barming (Kent) husbandman, 12 April 1625, 
proved 28 April 1625. My body to be buried in the church yard of East 
Farleigh. To the poor of East Farleigh twelve shillings. To the poor of 
East Barming eight shillings. To Mr. Basdeu minister of East Farleigh 
fifteen shillings at the day of my burial. To the wife of Tobias Lowes, 
with whom I live, for her pains she hath taken with me, four pounds. To 
Annis Preble three pounds. To the three childreu of Mary Brodshew 
widow twenty shillings apiece. I do make Mr. George Carpenter of East 
Farleigh my executor. Mary Bradshawe a witness. Clarke, 37. 

[In the will of James Clarke we have a number of New England names, viz., 
Abraham Preble, Weston Clarke and Dolor Davis. See also Ped. of Clerk in 
Vis. of London (Harl. Soc. Pub., vol. xv., p. 172). — H. F. Waters. 

Eben Putnam, editor of Putnam's Monthly Historical Magazine, prints in 
the number for September, 1805, page 253, an abstract of the will of Robert 
Preble, who names among his children a son Abraham. The emigrant ancestor 
of the New England Prebles bore the christian name of Abraham. He came to 
this country with the "Men of Kent" and settled somewhere about the year 
1036 at Scituate in Plymouth Colony. (See Rear Admiral Preble's Genealogy 
of the Preble Family, Boston, 1868.) These wills may assist in tracing the 
English ancestry of the New England family. The abstract of Robert Preble's 
will is as follows. — Editor.] 

Robert Preble of Denton, the elder, carpenter. Will dated 2 March, 
1634; proved 7 July, 1635. Sou Robert Preble, £20. Son Abraham 
Preble, £20. Daughter Elenor Benjamin, £6. Daughter Frances Jacob, 
£8. Daughter Margaret Preble, £4. Brother Richard Preble and son 
Robert Preble to be executors and they are authorized to sell house and 
lands to meet the legacies. 

Wit by Mary Bushell, Lawrence Carington. Arch. Kent., 69-85. 



1110 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

Rebecca Angell of London, wklow, 15 April 1676, with a codicil 
added 9 May, proved 7 March 1 676. My burial to be with as much pri- 
vacy as well may be and without charge of mourning, only that rings of 
ten shillings apiece be given for a remembrance of me to every one of my 
own brothers and sisters and to such as are or have been their wives or 
husbands, and also to my sister Elizabeth Angell. widow to my cousin 
William Angell, and to my sister Mary Ilocknell and to my cousin Michael 
Harvey and his wife and my cousin William Harvey. And concerning my 
estate I give the same wholly to my dear son William Angell &c, provided 
that if he die before his age of eighteen years then I give the sum of fifty 
pounds owing me by my brother Joshua Pordage to his sou, my cousin 
George Pordage. I make and ordain my loving brother Henry Mellish 
the executor of this my will, in trust only for my said son William Angell, 
and do constitute my said brother the guardian of my said son, willing and 
desiring him nevertheless, in the education and disposing of my said son, to 
take the advice and direction of my loving cousins Mr. Michael Harvey and 
Mr. William Harvey and my brother Mr. Walter Hampton and my said 
brother Pordage. 

In the Codicil Mrs. Angell desired that if her son William Angell should 
depart this life before the age of eighteen years that then what estate she 
hath left him, as in her will, shall be disposed of as followed), viz 1 she gives 
to her sister Mary Steele wife to Sergeant William Steele one hundred 
pounds, to Mr. Michael Harvey twenty pounds, to his brother Mr. William 
Harvey twenty pounds, the rest to her brother Henry Mellish. Hale, 28. 

[This will gives us a little more information about the English connections 
of George Pordage of Boston (Mass.). whose father, we have already learned, 
was Joshua Pordage.— H. F. Waters.] 

George Alcock of the parish of St. Katherine Cree Church alias 
Christ Church in London gen 1 , 27 February 1676, proved 9 March 1676. 
I give &c. all my lands, tenements &c. wherein I am now possessed or 
"interessed" in, or whereof I shall be possessed or interessed in, or which 
shall come to me by virtue of any Grant or Patent to be made to me, situ- 
ate in New England in the parts beyond the seas, in manner and form fol- 
lowing: one moiety, or half part, to my cousin Benjamin Walker, citizen 
and pewterer of London, to my brother John Alcock of New England, 
merchant, one fourth part, to my kinsman Joshua Lamb one eighth part, 
and the other eighth part to my brother Palsgrave Alcock and my five sis- 
ters, Ann Williams the wife of John Williams, Sarah Whitman the wife of 
Zachariah Whitman, Mary Lamb the wife of Joshua Lamb the father, 
Elizabeth Alcock and Joanna Alcock and their heirs, equally to be divided 
between them, to hold as tenants in common and not as joint tenants. Of 
my personal estate I give to my brother Zachariah Whitman ten pounds. 
Like sums to my uncle John Edwards the elder and Mr. Peter Thacher. 
To the church of Roxbury in New England five pounds. To the school 
there five pounds. The residue to be divided equally among my brothers 
and sisters. Benjamin Walker, Zachariah Whitman and Peter Thacher 
to be executors. 

Proved by the oaths of Benjamin Walker and Peter Thacher, two of the 
executors named in the will, power reserved to grant similar commission 
to Zachariah Whitman, the other executor named in the will, when he 
should come to demand it. Hale, 28. 

[One has only to refer to Savage's Gen. Diet, to learn who this George 
Alcock was.— IL F. Waters. 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1111 

George Alcock, grandfather of the testator, came in the fleet with Win- 
throp, and was connected with the Dorchester and Koxbury churches, as deacon. 
His w ill in H'>40 (REGISTER vol. ii., p. 104) leaves his property for education of 
his children, among whom is specially mentioned his son John, whom he went 
to England for. and brought to New England, educating him at Harvard. 
John graduated in the class of 1G40; married, about 1G48, Sarah, daughter of 
Dr. Richard and Anne Palsgrave, and died in 1GG7. Among their children were 
George, the testator, born iu 1G55, and the brothers and sisters mentioned as 
legatees. 

The testator was of the 1659 class of Harvard, and for a sketch of his life 
including an abstract of his will, see Sibley's Harvard Graduates, vol. ii., p. 
420-422. The inventory of his estate is in the Suffolk County (Mass.) Probate 
Files, No. 938, and Records, vol. vi., p. 225. — Walter K. Watkins.] 

Edward Moffatt of St. Sidwell's in the city of Exon, linen draper, 3 
March, 172G, proved 19 April 1727. To James Kennedy and to Anne, 
his daughter, twenty pounds apiece. To Edward Kennedy four hundred 
pounds. To my nephew William Kennedy fifteen hundred pounds. To 
my nephew John Johnson five hundred pounds. To my nephew James 
Johnson one hundred pounds. To my niece Sarah Johnson two hun- 
dred pounds. To my nephew William Johnson six thousand pounds. 
To my niece Mary Johnson two hundred pounds. To Jannet Pater- 
son and Mary Paterson four hundred pounds apiece. To my kinsman 
W m Moffatt fifteen pounds. To Adam Moffatt of Birmingham five 
pounds. To Margaret Moffatt five pounds. To Jannet Moffatt of Hook 
ten pounds. To Jannett Moffatt of Tundergarth five pounds. To William 
Tagert in London twenty pounds. To Thomas Armstrong two guineas. 
To Adam Smart a ring of fifteen shillings. A certain trust to be made for 
the use of four orthodox presbiterian ministers of the city of Exon. To 
my uncle Thomas Moffatt three pounds per annum for life. To the chil- 
dren of my kinsman John Moffatt two thousand pounds, they to have the 
income &c. for their maintenance and education, and I do appoint their 
father, William Johnson and John Kennedy trustees for the said children. 
To the parish of Corrie in the County of Annandale two hundred and 
eighty pounds the interest whereof is and shall bo to maintain a school- 
master for teaching the children there to read and write, and I give twenty 
pounds for building a schoolhouse. To the morning lecture at Bow meet- 
ing in Exon twenty shillings per annum and to the Charity School twenty 
shillings per annum. To James Scott of Shipton Mallet and his two sons 
two guineas each. 

Item, I give unto Thomas Moffatt of Boston in New England a ring of 
sixteen shillings value. To John Kenuedy all my household goods and 
one thousand pounds. All the residue to my kinsman John Moffatt and 
my nephew the said John Kennedy and I make them executors. 

Wit: Roger Hopping, Robert Livingston, Jn° Conant. Farrant, 95. 

[Mr. Thomas Moffett, named by the testator, is first found in Boston, exer- 
cising the duties of a constable in the year 1715, and at about the date of the 
testator's bequest, held the then responsible office of scavenger, to be followed 
by the still higher honor of a town assessor. His further advancement was 
slow, but ten years later, in 1739, he was chosen as a collector of taxes, but un- 
fortunately for the town Mr Moffett begged to be excused, as he was soon to be 
bound for Great Britain, where he doubtless went, as we find no more trace of 
him in Boston. In 1757 there appears a John Moffett, probably a young man, as 
he was chosen to that position usually tendered the young and active, the office 
of hosreeve. 

A Wm. Moffett was at Killingly, Conn., 1708-9, and later Dr. Thomas Moffatt 
of New London was of prominence. — Walter K. Watkins.! 



1112 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS 'IN ENGLAND. 

Thomas Willsonne of Bockinge, Essex, gen 1 ., 24 February 33 a Eliz th , 
proved 31 March 1591. Thomas Willsonne my father, late of Beduall 
Green, Middlesex deceased, did make me by his last will &c. his sole execu- 
tor. Leases of lands in Stepney, houses &c. in St. Martin's in the Fields 
by Charing Cross bequeathed by him. My daughters Susan, Elizabeth, 
Jane, Anne, Mary, Winifride, Frances and Dorothy at days of marriage or 
age of one and twenty years. My brother John Willsonn and his wife. 
My sister Bradhurrie. My sister Pigott. My sister Barbara Lucas. My 
sister Anne Haines. My sister Joaue. My sister Elizabeth. I give to 
Thomas Willsonn my eldest son a horn bordered about with silver parcel 
gilt. My son Philip Willsonn. John Robinson, my children's school- 
master. My uncle Jeffrey Brooke's wife. To my mother Simons one 
ring of gold with a death's head. Henry Barr. Son Thomas at one and 
twenty. My wife to be executrix and beloved friends, Master Edward 
Thursbie and my uncle Master Jeffery Brooke to be overseers. 

Among the witnesses were Lawncelott Browne, Doctor of Physic, and 
Humfrey Clarke. 

Proved by William Creake, Notary Public, Attorney for Susan the relict 
of the deceased. Sainbeibe, 23. 

Susan Willson of Booking, Essex, widow, late wife of Thomas 
Wilson gen 1 , deceased, her will dated 24 December 1615, published and 
declared 14 May 1616, proved 10 June 1616. To be buried in the church 
of Braintree. The poor of Braintree, Bocking and Stysted. My sons 
Philip and John Wilson. My son in law Thomas Trotter and my daughter 
Anne his wife. My son in law William Lyngwood and my daughter Mary 
his wife. My son in law Anthony Filioll. My daughter Winifride now 
wife of William Brocke. My grandchild Susan Spconer at one and twenty 
or day of marriage. Loving friends Christopher Thursbie Esq. and John 
Sorrell of Stebbing gen 1 . My cousin and loving friend John Smyth late of 
Loughborough in Leicestershire. My loving friend Mrs. Thursbie the wife 
of Christopher Thursbie of Bocking Esq. and my godson Mr. John Thurs- 
bye, his son. My cousin Mary Meade of Stansted Monfitchet, widow, and 
my godchild Mary Palmer, her daughter. My godchild Susan daughter .to 
Mr. John Sorrell of Stebbing. Henry Barre, sometimes my servant. 
Robert Byndes of Stisted, my good neighbor, and his daughter Susan now 
the wife of Matthew Francke of Bocking. Constance Bridge of Brayntree. 
l\lary Sparhawke sometimes my servant. Margery Dixon sometimes my 
servant and now the wife of Robert Billing. My servant Susan Glascocke. 
My uncle Mr. Jeffrey Brocke and my aunt his wife. My loving cousin 
Mrs. Frances Iremonger daughter of my uncle Jeffrey Brocke. Edward 
Barre my servant. My daughter Dorothy Filioll. I give to my son 
Philip Willson my three little messuages &c. in Brayntree, in a place there 
called the Pounde End. I give to my son John Willson my messuage or 
tenement &c. in Braintree which I lately bought of one John Denmau, now 
in the occupation of my son in law William Lyngwood, and two tenements 
&c. in Braintree now in the occupation of Richard Owltinge and Thomas 
Clarke. I give to William Lyngwood and my daughter Mary his wife my 
Inn &c. called the Ilorne in Braintree. which I purchased of Jervase Brad- 
shawe and now in said Bradshawe's occupation. My eldest son Thomas 
Willson. My daughters Anne Trotter and Mary Lyngwood shall have that 
messuage &c. called Lulls in Bradwell l>v Cosjijeshall Essex which was given 
to them and others by my father in law Mr. Symons, notwithstanding any 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1113 

release they have heretofore made unto me. Son John Willson and two 
sons in law Thomas Trotter ami William Lyngwood to be executors. Mary 
the wife of my son John. Mrs. Dorothy Glascock. Cope, 62. 

Philip Wilson of Bednall Greene, parish of Stepney, Middlesex, gen'., 
27 June 1620, proved 24 July 1620. Manor &c. of Bishop's Hall in Mid- 
dlesex to my son Philip. My son Thomas and my two (laughters Eliza- 
beth and Margaret Wilson. My three messuages in Braintree, Essex, 
called the Pounde. My mother in law Elizabeth Weldinge. My uncle 
Thomas Hogge. My brother in law James Baynes. My sister in law Jane 
Weldinge. Soame, 73. 

John Wilson of Wurdon Abbey in the Co. of Bedford, gen'., 16 April 
1622, proved 31 July 1622. To be buried iu the church of Wardon. My 
sou Charles at oue and twenty and daughters Mary and Elizabeth Wilson 
at eighteen or marriage. To my wife Bridget my messuages, lands &c. in 
Braintree, Essex, to hold till my son Charles comes to his full age of oue 
and twenty years. My wife and my father in law Thomas Wynn, gent, to 
be executors and my brother Thomas Wilson and my brother in law Wil- 
liam Linswood to be overseers. Savile, 64. 

John Smith of London, gen 1 ., 7 December 1625, proved 8 November 
1626. To my nephew Richard Morecrofte son of my sister Phillipp More- 
crofte my house and messuage with land &c, being freehold land bought 
by me of his father Thomas Morecrofte, deceased some years past, situate 
in Loughborowe, Leicestershire; but the said Richard's mother, my sister, 
shall have her dwelling therein during her natural life. My niece Mary 
Newton wife of Miles Newton of London haberdasher. Thomas Newton, 
her son. My niece Margaret Allen, daughter of my sister Phillipp More- 
crofte and wife to John Allen of Loughborowe. My niece Dorothy Lovet 
wife to William Lovet of Loughborowe, tanner. Niece Joaue Morecrofte. 
To the late left wife of my nephew Lawrence Palmer, late of Stausteed 
Montfitched in the county of Herford and every one of said Lawrence Pal- 
mer's children born of this widow, his late wife. Matthew Palmer secoud 
son to my sister Mary Meade late of Stansted Montfitched, widow, and 
George Palmer her third son. Susan, her eldest daughter, Katherine, her 

second daughter, and Mary, her third daughter. Jane luce ah. , 

now living in the city of Dublin, Ireland, being the daughter of my niece 
Phillipp Turner ah. Ince, late deceased, whilst she lived the wife of Richard 
Turnor. My cousin Richard Turnor and Anne Tumor, his daughter. My 
brother in law Thomas Howgh of Loughborowe dyer, sometime husband 
unto my sister Ann, and Thomas Howgh the younger, her son. My niece 
Elizabeth Fowler now dwelling in Loughborowe, daughter of my said sister 
Ann. My niece Patience Warde, wife to Michaell Wurde of London, gro- 
cer, and each of her children. My niece Mary daughter of my said sister 
Ann. My niece Isabel Howgh, now in service in London, another daugh- 
ter, and Ann Howgb the youngest daughter. My brother in law William 
Felgate and his daughter Ann, my god daughter, and every of his sons, 
being two in number, and each of his other daughters besides the said Ann 
and Blanch Felgate, his daughter (to whom a larger bequest). My cousin 
Mrs. Francis Iremonger and her daughter Katheren Iremonger and her 
other daughters. Every one of her sons. Their father Mr. Henry Ire- 
monger, my cousin. My cousin Miles Newton. 

I give to my cousin Mr. Thomas Trotter five pounds and to his wife, my 



1114 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

cousin Ann Trotter, five pounds and to every one of their children twenty 
shillings apiece. I give to my cousin Mrs. Dorothy Filliall three pounds and 
to my cousin Mrs. Mary Lingwood three pounds and to my cousin Wini- 
fride Brocke three pounds. John Alleyn, my kinsman, one of the church- 
wardens of Loughborowe. My sister Morecrofte's two daughters Margaret 
Allen and Dorothy Lovett. My niece Mary Newton and her sister Joane. 
My cousin Edward Bagguley and his two sisters Elizabeth and Cassandra. 
My cousin Thomas Slywright of the Inner Temple Esq. Mrs. Bridget 
Wilson widow, late the wife of John Wilson gen*, deceased. Mrs. Ilorsell 
widow, sister of my said cousin Mr. Henry Iremonger. Myles Newton 
and Henry Iremonger to be executors. Hele, 11G. 

Thomas W t ilson of Bocking, Essex, gen 1 ., 1G October 1627, proved 9 
November 1G27. My body to be buried in the chancel of Braintree. The 
poor of Bocking, Stisted and Braintree. My messuage and farm in Great 
and Little Canfield to be sold by Humfry Mawditt, gen'., and my brother 
in law William Lyngwood for payment of my debts and legacies. To my 
daughter Elizabeth my copyhold lands in Braintree, called Companes or 
otherwise, now in the occupation of the said William Lingwood, and the 
parcel of land in Braintree called the horsefair field and Windmill Hill in 
Braintree (and other lands), to enter upon the same at her age of one and 
twenty years, with remainder to daughter Mary, next to daughter Dorothy. 
Bequests to Mary and Dorothy. My eldest son, John, hath behaved him- 
self very disobediently towards me and my wife, his mother, and I see little 
hope of amendment. My mill called Stisted mill, in Stisted. Although 
my sou Thomas hath heretofore behaved himself undutifully to me and my 
wife, his mother, yet I hope better of him hereafter. My wife Elizabeth. 
My messuage and farm called Hatches in Braintree. My manor or mes- 
suage called Jenkins to my wife, for her life, and after her decease to my 
son Thomas. Sir William Maxey, knight, my worthy friend. My cousin 
James Heron Esq. My mother In law Mrs. Mary Clarke. My sisters 
Mary Lingwood and Dorothy Filioll. My cousin and god daughter Susan 
Lingwood. Mrs. Catherine Mawditt. My wife to be sole executrix. I do 
earnestly entreat Sir William Maxey, knight, and my cousin Heron to be 
supervisors. 

Amon" the witnesses were Eulke Wodhull and W. Lvnjjwood. 

Skynner, 114. 

Thomas Tkotter of London, merchant, 30 November 1631, sealed and 
published 1 March 1631, proved 12 March 1631. Debts and funeral 
charges satisfied and paid my personal estate to be divided into two equal 
parts, one half being in my proper power, by the eminent and laudable 
custom of City of London, and the other half belonging to my children. I 
have already advanced and preferred in marriage my two eldest daughters, 
Anne and Elizabeth. My two youngest daughters unadvanced, Susanne 
and Thomasin Trotter. My eldest daughters (named) Anne Grove and 
Elizabeth Amos. My grandchildren Thomas and Anne Grove. My grand- 
child Isacke Amos. The Company of Salters of London whereof I am a 
member. I do forgive and release unto my uncle Nicholas Skynner and 
my cousin Martyn (Skynner) and to Thomas Skynner, his so nail such 
sum and sums of money as they owe unto me by specialty or otherwise. 
My cousin Daniel Skynner and my cousin Richard Wiseman. My sister 
Lyngwood, my cousin Susan Spooner and my cousin Laurence Arthure's 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1115 

wife, my cousin Robert Whaple's wife and my cousin Myles Newton's wife. 
To Nicholas Woodward of Bookings. The pastor and curate of St. Dun- 
stan in the East where I dwell. Mr. Nathaniel Shute to preach a sermon 
for the instructing of the people that shall assemble at my funeral, which I 
hope and desire the parson of St. Dunstan will give leave unto. My two 
youngest daughters, Susan and Thomasine Trotter and my friend Joseph 
Brand to be executors and my brother William Lyngwood, my son in law 
Thomas Amos and my friends Myles Newton and Lawrence Arthur to be 
supervisors. I have in my life time settled and assured, by several deeds, 
certain lands and an annuity out of a house in Braintree and Booking, 
Essex, to the uses of the several poor in those parishes. Then follows a 
note of such parishes as are to have fifty pounds distributed amongst their 
poor. Eight parishes in Colchester, the three parishes in Sudbury (where 
John Lord and Robert Whitinges were among those to oversee the distri- 
bution), Braintree (under the oversight of Mr. John Hawkins, W m Ling- 
wood, John Mary an, John Debnam, Adrian Mott), Booking (John Keightlye, 
Lawrence Arthur, John Ames (?), Isaack Ansell, Matthew Whipple), 

Coxall (Coggeshall), Witham (Jeremy Garoad, William Skynner, 

Nycholls), ilalsted and certain parishes in London and four parishes in 
South wark. Audley, 31. 

Mary Clarke of Locking, Essex, widow, 4 September 1630, proved 
1 June 1G33. My body to be buried in the Chancel of Bradwell. The 
poor of Bradwell, Booking and Stisted. My loving brother Sir William 
Maxey, knight, my son in law John Nodes, gen 1 . My daughter Nodes. 
My daughter Dorothy Wilsmore. I give to my sou William Clarke four 
pounds and to his two sons twenty shillings apiece. To my grandchild 
Elizabeth Wilson twenty shillings. To my grandchild and god daughter 
Mary Wilson twelve pounds, my silver spoon and my wedding ring. To 
my grandchild Dorothy Wilson thirty shillings and my little ring. To my 
grandchild John Wilson twenty shillings and I forgive him five pounds 
which he oweth me. To my grandchild Thomas Wilson three pounds. 
To my cousin Mr. Bryan Tuke forty shillings. To William Lingwood 
gen*, and Mary his wife, my god daughter, twenty shillings apiece. Mr. 
Normingtou of Bradwell to preach at my burial. Four of Sir William 
Maxey 's men to carry my body to church to be buried. My grandchild 
Mary Wilson to be executrix and William Lyngwood supervisor. 

Russell, 58. 

Dorothy Wilson of Booking, Essex, singlewoman (nuncupative), 6 
October 1636. She gave all to her brother Thomas and his wife. Com- 
mission issued, 15 October 1636, to Thomas Wilson and Jane his wife, the 
legataries, &c, to administer &c. Pile, 105. 

William Read of Booking, Essex, yeoman, 20 March 1646, proved 
23 April 1649. To Daniel Read, one of my brother Francis Read's sons, 
my tenement and freehold lands in Panfield, late purchased of the widow 
Coggeshall, he to pay his brother Francis Read twenty pounds and twenty 
pounds unto William Stoakes. To my brother Thomas Read, for life, my 
two tenements called Levitt's, in Locking, and after his decease to his son 
William. To Elizabeth Wilson, my kinswoman, wife of John Wilson, 
my tenement called Arnold's, for life, and next to her son William Wilson, 
with remainder to the rest of her children. My godson William Stokes. 
My godson James Freeman. The rest of the children of James Free- 



1116 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

man, viz*. Henry, John and Elizabeth Freeman. My godson William 
Miller, son of William Miller of High lloding. Martha Princett daugh 
ter of John Princett. Agnes Clarke, the wife of Robert Clarke of Fel- 
sted, and Agnes Clarke her daughter. My brother Thomas Reade to be 
sole executor and my kinsman Daniel Read to be overseer. 

Fairfax, 45. 

[A pedigree of this family of Wilson is given in the Visitations of Essex 
(Harl. Soci Pub., Vol. 13, p. 525). These wills and a lot of other wills relating 
to East Anglian families which I have been gathering for years I am getting 
into print partly, perhaps chiefly, for my own convenience, since they are all 
more or less connected with families who, I am sure, had each of them one or 
more representatives in New England : when once in print they can be much 
more easily referred to than if they were to remain, as hitherto, only in manu- 
script. William Lyngwood who married into this family of Wilson was somehow 
related or connected with numerous New Englanders, as appears from his letter 
of 20 March 1651 to his " Cosen Clarke," to be found in Vol. 2 of Land Records 
in the office of the Secretary of State, Hartford, Connecticut, and published in 
full in The Goodwins of East Anglia, 1890. No one acquainted with the records 
of the early settlers of Massachusetts Bay and Connecticut will read these 
East Anglian wills which I shall furnish without being struck, as I have been, 
with their significance even where positive clews are not given. 

Henry F. Waters.] 

Elizabeth Ci.opton late of Boxford, Suffolk, widow (nuncupative) 
25 October 1603, proved 18 February 1G03. The poor of Boxford. 
Master Sandes the preacher. John Potter in whose house she lodged. 
Mistress Brande her cousin. The widow Bra£. The widow Brande. The 
widow Gierke. All the residue (her debts being paid and legacies dis- 
charged) she willed should be divided between John Whiting, Henry Whit- 
ing, Elizabeth Tarver, her grandchildren, and Thomas Gates, her great 
grandchild. 

Wit : Anne Brande, John Potter and divers others. 

Commission issued (at above date) to John and Henry Whiting as next 
akin, to administer according to the tenor of the will. Harte, J 6. 

Samuel Armitage citizen and mercer of London, 23 September 1631, 
proved 15 October 1631. Wife Joane Armitage to be executrix. My 
brother in law John Seaman, my sister Sara, his wife, and every one of 
their children. My brother in law Matthew Langley, my sister Mary, his 
wife, and every one of their children. My brother in law James Boulton, 
my sister Anne, his wife, and every one of their children. My brother 
in law John Key, my sister Dorothy, his wife, and every one of their chil- 
dren. My sister Jane Armitage. My uncle Mr. Samuel Armitage. My 
friend Mr. Arthur Lee. I do give unto my loving aunt Mrs. Hester Long- 
ley and Mrs. Susan Williamot ten shillings apiece. My cousin Elizabeth 
Chambers. My cousin Mr. Samuel Slater, Mr. Dr. Burges and Mr. Shad- 
rach Simpson, ministers of the word of God. Katherine and Ann Simp- 
son daughters of the said Mr. Shadrach Simpson. My friend Mr. Edward 
Taylor, citizen and girdler of London. Mr. John Basset, Mr. Edmoud 
Clerke and Mr. John Felton. My loving uncle Mr. Samuel Armitage and 
my loving friend Mr. Arthur Lee to be overseers. St. John, 105. 

John Whiting of Hadley, Suffolk, Mercer, 2 April 1637, proved 15 
November 1637. To Rose my loving wife all those my lands and tene- 
ments in Naughton (Newton?) and Neging, in the occupation of Robert 
Marshall (and others) for and during her life, upon condition that she shall 






GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1117 

sea! a good perfect release unto ray sons John and Henry of all her thirds 
or dower of the rest of ray lands and houses &c. And after the decease of 
Rose my wife I give the said lands and tenements, both free and copy, in 
Newton and Neging unto John Whiting my son. I give him my lands in 
Layow with a mill thereunto belonging, called Coe mill. 1 give him my 
house wherein I dwell in Hadly and the piece of grouud near Tapsall 
bridge. I give and bequeath unto Henry Whiteing my son my house and 
land in Bramford. both free and copy, upon condition that he pay the rest 
of the money which is behind and unpaid by John Beadswell out of the 
land at Wenam which I purchased in his name for him and gave him at 
Wenom, as by John Berde's will appeareth. I give unto Henry my son 
seven hundred pounds of lawful money, i.e. five hundred at the age of five 
and twenty years and the other two hundred within one year after his 
apprenticeship come out. I give unto Rose my wife fifty pounds. To 
Mary Coper my daughter forty pounds. To Henry my son my part of a 
ship called the Roebucke. I give to Henry my copyhold house at Carsy. 
1 will that he shall pay unto his mother ten pounds a year during her widow- 
hood. I give unto Robert Payne my son in law my house and land in 
Newton, free and copy, called the Saracen's Head, with the appurteuances, 
to him during his life and after his death to John Payne, -my grandchild, 
and his heirs forever; and for want of such heirs to return to my heirs 
again ; but upon condition the said Robert Paine do assure to his two sons 
that he had by my daughter, John and Robert Payne, the sum of thirty 
pounds apiece 'more as he stand bound to do upon marriage and that 
he do seal a release to my son John Whiting of all former promises. I 
give to Thomas Whiting my grandchild twenty pounds of current money to 
be laid out in plate for him. I give to Hanna Proctor my grandchild 
twenty nobles and to John Payne my grandchild forty pounds and to 
Robert Payne my grandchild twenty nobles and to George Coper my 
grandchild twenty nobles; and all these my grandchildren to be paid when 
they shall come to the age of twenty one years. I give to Thomas Gattes 
the younger, my godson, forty shillings at one and twenty. To my cousin 
Thomas Gattes a black cloak. To Mary Bowes, Alles Upsher, my old 
servant forty shillings. The poor of Hadley and of Boxford. My son 
John to be residuary legatee and sole executor. And I do nominate and 
entreat my two loving friends and cousins Mr. Robert Stansby, parson of 
AVestrop, and Mr. John Browing, parson of Semer, to be supervisors. 
Witnesses Richard Tilson, Thomas Gattes. Goare, 150. 

John Whiteing of ITadleigh, Suffolk, mercer, 16 January 1643, proved 
30 January 1644. To wife Judith all my household stuff and fifty pounds 
in money upon condition that she shall give a full release of the thirds of 
my lauds to my two supervisors to the use of my children. I give her my 
house at Hadleigh wherein I dwell and all my lands and my mill in Lang- 
ham and Raydon to have and enjoy only the time she shall continue my 
widow. I have discharged my wife's former estate of those legacies which 
it was engaged for. My desire is my two sons Thomas and John Whiteing 
should be brought up with their mother so long as she remain my widow ; 
but if she happen to marry my mind is that my son Thomas should be 
brought up by his grandmother Whiteing, or placed with one to bring up 
by her appointment, and my son John, ray desire is, that his grandmother 
Harrison should bring up or place. I give to Thomas my son all those 
lands and tenements, copy and free, in Nawten Nedging now in possession 



1118 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

of my mother Whiteing for term of her life (and after her decease be- 
queathed to myself hy my father's last will). To Thomas my house at 
Hadleigh (all these at twenty two) and all my interest iu the house called 
the Saruson's Head or else a hundred pounds which I lent my brother 
Payne of New England upon it, my son to have it at twenty two. To 
John my son all my lands and mill in Langham and Raydon (at twenty 
two). Eight hundred pounds to Thomas at four and twenty and five hun- 
dred pounds to John (at same age). To my loving mother Whiteing twenty 
pounds. To my mother ten pounds. Poor of Hadleigh. Wife Judeth to 
be sole executrix and my brother Henry Whiteing and my cousin Thomas 
Gates to be supervisors. Mr. Richardson and Richard Tilson of Hadleigh. 
Wit. William Richardson and Nath. Gale. Rivers, 31. 

[Brother Payne is Robert Paine, a younger brother of William, one of the 
foremost business men in the Bay colony. Both were citizens of Ipswich, where 
Robert was ruling elder in the church, and feoffee of the Grammar school. They 
were sons of William Paine, of Nowton, in Suffolk. The late Henry W. Paine, 
LL.D., the eminent Boston lawyer, derived descent from this family. 

Geo. A. Gordon.] 

John Prockter citizen and weaver of London, 11 November 1G48, 
proved 5 March 1G48. If Elizabeth, my dear and loving wife, shall within 
fourteen days next after my decease release and discharge to Henry Prock- 
ter citizen and weaver of London (father of me the said John Prockter) all 
that estate and jointure made unto my said wife by my said father, in and 
by a certain Indenture bearing date 20 December 1645, made between the 
said Henry Prockter on the one party and Edmund Staunton of Kingstone 
upon Thames, Surrey, Doctor in Divinity, on the other party, then I do 
give and bequeath to the said Elizabeth all my goods &c. in my house in 
Cheapeside, London, and the one half of all my goods &c. whatsoever. The 
other moiety to be divided into three parts, of which one third to my son 
John another third to my son Henry and the other third I give as follow- 
eth ; that is to say to my mother Jone Prockter three pounds (to buy her a 
ring) to my three sisters Sarah, Mary and Hannah Prockter each of them 
forty shillings (for rings) to my aunt Mary Pigeon five pounds, to my uncle 
Thomas Prockter five pounds and the residue of this third part of the 
moiety of my estate I give to my said son Henry. To wife Elizabeth 
the twenty pounds now in the hands of her uncle Robert Staunton Esq. and 
given to her by her late grandfather deceased. Fairfax, 29. 

Henry Prockter, gen 1 , of Kensington, Middlesex, 27 September 1G50, 
proved 17 October 1G50. My daughter iu law Elizabeth the wife of my 
late son John Prockter. Four houses in Coleman Street, Loudon. My 
wife Joane. My daughter Hannah Prockter. Seven houses in or near 
Coleman Street. The house I now live in, in Kensiugton. My daughter 
Sarah Prockter. My grandchild Henry Prockter. My sister Mary Pigeon. 
My lease of ground in Wapping, parish of Stepney. My sister's son Thomas 
Piggeon. Seven acres in Kensington I lately bought of George Harrison. 
My brother Thomas Prockter. Francis Prockter my present servant. My 
cousin Elizabeth Barnes and her four children. My grandchild John Prock- 
ter. My sister Frances Willson. Ten pounds to the parish of Kensington 
towards the building of a free school if begun within eighteen months after 
my decease. Capt. John Stone, Mr. William Mountague, Mr. John Up- 
cher and William Viner to be overseers. Wife Joane executrix. Dauiih- 
ter Mary Rackster. 

John Stone one of the witnesses. Pembroke, 153 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1119 

Sarah Proctor, daughter of Henry Proctor late of Kensington, Mid- 
dlesex, gentleman, 17 January 1653, declared and published 14 August 
1654, proved 25 October 1654. To my mother Johauua Proctor fifty 
pounds for a legacy and the ten pounds which I paid towards the building 
of two new chambers in the house at Kensington and five pounds for 
mourning. To my sister Hannah Tompson forty pounds and my chest of 
drawers and one gold ring and live pounds for mourning. John Proctor 
and Henry Proctor. My uncle Thomas Proctor and his nine children. 
My aunt Mary Pigeon. Thomas Pigeon. My cousin Elizabeth Barnes. 
My cousin Elizabeth Birdseye. My uncle Henry Whiting. My uncle 
Samuel Slator. John Upcher and bis wife and two children John and 
Samuel Upcher. Thomas Hodges minister of Kensington. Patience Chap- 
man and her two daughters Hannah and Grace. I give unto Margaret 
Cheevers widow ten pounds. To the poor of the church which my uncle 
Slator is pastor of ten pounds. My brother Fr. Tompson. My brother 
Jeremy Proctor to be executor and Francis Tompson and John Upcher 
overseers. 

Wit. John Upcher, Peaceabl Power. Alchin, 9. 

Johanna Proctor of Loudon, Widow, 23 April 1658, proved 3 April 
1661. My grandchild Henry Procter at one and twenty. The children 
of my daughter in law Hannah Thompson. Samuel and Francis the two 
sons of my son in law Francis Thompson and of my said daughter in law 
Hannah Thompson, his wife, at their ages of one and twenty years. My 
sister Pigeon and my cousin Thomas Pigeon. My brother Thomas Proc- 
ter and my cousin Frances his daughter. My sister Pigeon's daughter's 
five children which she now hath. My grandchild John Procter. The 
four daughters of Mrs. Patience Chapman widow, deceased. Mrs. Isabella 
Simpson, widow. Mrs. Martha Davis, widow, and her four daughters. 
Mr. Manning and his wife. My brother Slater minister at Katherine's 
near the Tower. Mr. Kentish also minister there. Mr. Philip Nye the 
elder and Mr. John Loder. I give unto Mrs. Chevers and her daughter 
Hannah twenty pounds. Mrs. Gabell. Mrs. Knight, widow. Mr. Rich- 
ard Legate. The poor of Kensington, Middlesex, for the buying of coals 
to be distributed amongst the poor there. Mrs. Hodges wife of Mr. 
Hodges, minister of Kensington. Mrs. Steele the wife of Mr. Lawrance 
Steele of Kensington. My cousin Richardson. My brother Whitinge. 
My sister Lawrance. Mrs. Birdsey. Mrs. Sweet, late of Kensington, 
widow, and her daughter Hannah Sweet. Mr. Ragnor (Raynor?) minister 
of Egham, Surrey. The son of Mrs. Archer, widow. I give unto Captain 
John Stone forty pounds and to Mrs. Mary Stone his wife my best diamond 
ring and my bible with silver clasps. I give unto Mrs. Mary Stone the 
daughter of the said Captain Stone my ring with a great stone in it and my 
little cabinet. I give unto my son in law Mr. Jeremiah Backster forty 
pounds, viz* twenty pounds to be paid him by my son Francis Thompson 
and Mr. John Upcher out of the rents &c. of my houses in Wapping and 
twenty pounds out of my other estate. My grandchildren Charles and 
Elizabeth Zinzon. To Mrs. Slater living in Clutched Fryers, London, the 
wife of the brother of my said brother Slater, five pounds. To the poor 
of the chinch whereof the said Mr. Nye is teacher and the said Mr. Loder 
pastor, whereof I am a member, and not to the poor of the parish where 
they preach, twenty pounds. The poor of St. Ollave's Southwark. The 
poor of St. Katherine's near the lower and the poor of the particular 



1120 GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

church or congregation whereof my said brother Slater is pastor. Mr. 
George Cooper a scholar of the University of Oxford. The poor of St. 
Stephen's Colman Street. My body to be buried in Bartholomew's near 
the Exchange, London, or at Kensington. I do make and ordain the said 
Captain John Stone sole executor and my said son in law Jeremiah Bax- 
ter, Mr. Francis Thompson and the said Mr. John Upcher overseers. 

May, 60. 

Henry Whiting of Ipswich, Suffolk, gen 1 , 22 March 1685, with a codi- 
cil bearing date 13 March 1686, proved 11 May 1687. To my daughter 
Mrs. Mary Blomfield three hundred pounds, to be secured for her sole and 
separate use and dispose. To my grandson Henry Blomfield one hundred 
pounds. To my son Peyton Ventris Esq. and to my daughter Margaret 
his wife my manors of Waylands and of Ipswich Atwards ah St. Peters 
and all that messuage, with the garden, orchard and appurtenances, now iu 
the occupation of the said Peyton Ventris, and all other manors, messuages, 
lands &c. that I lately purchased and were formerly the estate of Edward 
Mann Esq. deceased. I give to the said Peyton Ventris my messuage and 
lands in Wenhain Parva, Suffolk, now in the occupation of John Gentry. 
Provision made for Henry Parsons and my daughter Christian his wife and 
the daughter of the said Henry which he now hath by the said Christian. 
My three daughters Mary, Margaret and Judith. I give to Judith my 
messuage, lands, &c, both freehold and copyhold, in Brornford, Suffolk. I 
give to my sister in law Mrs. Lawrence ten pounds. I give to Mrs. Thomp- 
son the wife of Francis Thompson, merchant, ten pounds. I give to George 
Cooper, clerk, ten pounds and to my cousin Robert Paine ten pounds and 
to the son of my nephew Thomas Whiting deceased ten pounds, to buy 
each of my aforesaid cousins pieces of plate in remembrance of me. I give 
to Mr. Raymer (or Raynier) minister of St. Lawrence Parish three pounds 
and to the poor of the parish five pounds. My cousin Lawrence Stisted. 
I give my house wherein I dwell at Ipswich and my shipping, plate, house- 
hold stuff, moneys and the rest and residue of my estate to be equally divided 
among my three daughters (as above). I do require all my daughters and 
their respective husbands and their heirs to convey and release all their 
right in the houses and tenements in Coggeshall, Fssex, to such persons as 
shall be interested in the same under a sale I formerly made of them. I 
make and appoint my son Peyton Vendris executor. 

Among the witnesses were George Raymond and Mathew Harrison. 

Foot, 70. 

Nicholas Stanton of Ipswich, Suffolk, clerk, 9 November 1648, 
proved 14 February 1649. I will and bequeath to my executors all that 
land &c. which I lately purchased of Henry Stanton of Fritton, lying in 
the same town in the County of Norfolk, containing about thirty acres, to 
be by them sold for the payment of my debts and legacies, within one year 
after my decease, in the church porch of Stratton Mihills (Michaels) in the 
Co. of Norfolk, to such of those persons that live and have their abode in 
the said County, viz' to my kinsman William Sabbourne twenty pounds, 
part of it a debt due from my father to him and part of it promised by my 
father to him as a gift and legacy from him, to my sister Margaret Stanton 
fifty pounds, being that portion of money which my father intended for her 
if his estate would reach it, to Mary my wife twenty pounds which I had 
of her, which she intended for the use and behoof of George Cooper her 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 1121 

son. I give to the poor of Margaret's parish, Ipswich, ten pouuds, five 
pounds of it to be la.ii 1 out in bibles for distribution and five pounds in 
money. The po